Morning round-up: Friday 17 February

The morning’s top legal affairs news stories

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Brexit judge Lord Neuberger’s verdict on basement plan near his mews home: it cannot Remain [Evening Standard]

Tutor warns Cambridge students not to wear their gowns in town amid fears of a backlash over the Tory law student who burnt a £20 note in front of a homeless man [Mail Online]

Who is Phil Shiner? Iraq War tank-chaser lawyer guilty of misconduct after involvement in Battle of Danny Boy case [The Sun]

Trump to sign new immigration policy after multiple court defeats of travel ban [The Guardian]

Calls grow for Bolton Council to show proof of Asons £300,000 grant spending [This is Lancashire]

Should robots be given their own legal status as ‘electronic persons’? EU ministers want to enforce laws on machines to guarantee safety [Mail Online]

Making A Murderer prisoner Brendan Dassey’s freedom hangs in balance as appeal court sits [Mirror]

Man sues Uber for revealing his affair to his wife [Above The Law]

Apply to attend: How to become a serious injury lawyer — live in Manchester [Legal Cheek Hub]

“From Lord Hailsham to Truss in twenty years. It’s embarrassing.” [Legal Cheek comments]

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2 Comments

Not Amused

I don’t think the Standard article is appropriate. I am not necessarily blaming the Neubergers, they didn’t write it. But they do seem to have talked to the press and Lady N is an experienced person when it comes to the media – indeed Lord N is our most published judge.

As a barrister I cannot use the fact I am a barrister to intimidate a prospective opponent in litigation. I cannot or should not disclose what I am if doing so might put undue pressure on someone I am arguing with. It seems to me that a similar rule should apply to the President of the Supreme Court: who is somewhat more intimidating than I am.

(2)(2)
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