Interview

Does appearing on The X Factor help you get a training contract?

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Legal Cheek‘s Liz Wong meets Queen Mary law student and R&B singer Garry Caprani

garry

15,700 Twitter followers. An appearance on a hit talent show. Favourite subject: tort law. Garry Caprani is hardly your typical law student.

As most students scramble for legal work experience this summer, Caprani, who has just completed the second year of an undergraduate law degree at Queen Mary University of London, is on another adventure — to pursue a potential career as a recording music artist. He is doing this while acting as a new student brand manager for major City law firm Berwin Leighton Paisner. Over coffee in Haggerston, east London, earlier this week, he reflects:

“I’m trying out music this summer with events in Leicester Square and Liverpool, and I’ll be working on strategies as the new manager.”

Born in London and raised in Spain, Caprani is a mash-up of a rising star R&B heartthrob and a wannabe lawyer. Following his debut last summer on The X Factor — in which he reached the Boot Camp stage of the competition — he is caught between two worlds as he plots his career. One is music; the other is the classic solicitor route to a commercial firm. Caprani mentions an interest in general commercial, media and IP law, without losing focus on an alternative career in music, continuing:

“There’s a split in the middle, I’m a realist. The music industry is really difficult to get into, and I do see myself working in a law firm … but when I look back 20 years time, I just don’t want to have any regrets.”

Caprani is well known. Alongside his Twitter following, he has over 3,000 subscribers on his YouTube channel with updated music videos covering pop hits and originals, with a fan base via Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat. Most recently, during his year as vice president of the Queen Mary Law Society, he started a commercial awareness blog — The Commercial Cartel — with the hopes of gaining the same degree of attraction he has received from music fans. He explains:

“I want to build a successful website, and expand it this year by not just remaining with commercial issues, but politics, lifestyle and more involvement from other people.”

Ambitious and confident, Caprani is reluctant to give up on what he admits is the riskier path to pursue his dream as a music star. So why the added investment and stress in studying law in university?

“I enjoy the idea of law because it permeates across everything, all foundations are based on law. I think everyone should study law — it’s in absolutely everything we do. The fact that we’re here, we went for coffee; we’ve entered into a contract,” he responds.

The decision to combine a law degree with extra-curricular music aspirations stems from advice received from Caprani’s family. Both career options are an expression of his vocal strengths, debating and singing, as he explains:

“I always liked arguing with people so my mum said I should probably do something like law, and my sister always did music when she was younger and she was quite good, so I wanted to do the same. I started with karaoke, and then started winning singing competitions.”

Caprani gives calculated answers when discussing his legal future, and emphasises some commitment to commercial law. When asked about how music may help in an interview with a law firm he hesitates, and suggests that mentioning The X Factor is more an indirect tool to help him remain a prominent memory in the minds of firms’ graduate recruiters.

He is more effusive when talking about his approach to songwriting. He explains that his original song, entitled ‘Scar’, was an artistic response to a Twitter message he received from a follower on the subject of self-harm.

“The message was really deep and it’s quite a good song,” recalls Caprani.

He goes on to confess that he enjoys penning tracks about romance:

“I like writing about girls, it’s like a go-to thing. You write your best songs from personal experience. I write my best songs in the heat of the moment when something happens to me. I feel that emotion and respond quickly through music.”

Despite pressing career decisions, Caprani is relaxed about the future. Both law and music are equally competitive, he reckons, with the advantage that law may have a more objective selection process; decisions are based on grades and experience — rather than factors like popularity and likeability favoured by music bosses.

Certainly, Caprani continues, marketing oneself to a panel of law firm partners is more intimidating than facing producers because of the demanding intellectual agenda of the legal world. For now, though, Caprani’s options remain open. He beams:

“I am anxious about both, but confident at the same time.”

Watch Garry Caprani on YouTube

32 Comments

Not Amused

Best of luck to him – we need more interest in law amongst lay people and if he can increase that interest in any way then he is a good thing.

(18)(2)

Legal cheek you're better than this...

The commercial cartel was meant to be part of the law society but his selfishness was exposed by him setting out to do this by himself at the expense of everyone in the society of which he was vice-president for. This is not a law society initiative and was reflected by his failure to get elected as President this year. Hardly a role model at all especially for someone who wants to work in commercial law.

As for writing about girls this seems to be all he concerns his time with as opposed to his law degree.

Surely, firms should take people who are solely committed to a career in commercial law. Not those who are partially committed. This is a pitiful marketing option by him.

(26)(21)

Anonymous

Jealousy at its finest

(22)(6)

Anonymous

Omg how jealous is that person obs your law society this year has failed without the students from the two years previously.. Wonder who wrote that comment and this is not GC writing this
Well done Garry keep up the good work..

(16)(6)

Caprani babe, god please..

He is only studying law to have something to fall back on, he only really cares about music and thinks he is amazing but clearly no one wants him for a reason. The fact that he only made it to boot camp and they didn’t even show his audition says it all, and he turned down joining the boy band because he was “too good” for them.
He will never get a recording contract, he’s just not good enough. Someone has to be realistic.
Stop thinking you are amazing at everything, more people dislike for that exact reason.

(12)(18)

Anonymous

jealousy at its finest ladies and gentleman.

(6)(5)

Sir Viv

Haters gonna hate

(5)(4)

bar-steward

Not committed to the legal prof and certainly not a role model…

(12)(16)

Anonymous

Committed enough to be BLP BRAND MANAGER they must see something good in him #troll # jealous give the boy a break should add your names to any post you post I would have more respect for the comments about him
Or just being nasty

(15)(9)

Anonymous

GC is all about showing off. Its not jealousy when you work with and know how people operate. Its easy to sit from where you are and claim jealousy. To be honest, I don’t even like how his sound is..I think it sounds too drained..too forced and not at all something I want to hear on the charts. All of his songs sound similar, like stretched out. If law is his fall back and that fails, I really wish you well, cause clearly X factor knew what they were saying.

(8)(15)

Anonymous

But in this country we have a choice if you don’t like his music don’t like him don’t listen solved..don’t like him don’t read about him solved
Just don’t post negative posts very childish

(15)(2)

Anonymous

In this country we also have an entitlement to opinion. Just as people say ‘jealousy’, equally I can say you’re biased because you may be a close friend etc. It’s not childish when it’s fact that those who have actually worked with him can tell you how his work ethic is..what’s childish is when you instantly claim its jealousy and tell people not to post negative things. And once again I’m pretty sure I can do/read/express whatever I want. Garry honestly, you’re following your dreams and if you make it big one day kudos but you know, just as other musicians do, not everyone is gonna like your taste or style and they are entitled to SAY SO. In that field, sometimes listening to the negative feedback could help you. If you don’t like my comment, don’t read it/don’t respond. Simple.

(10)(12)

Anonymous

I don’t even know him
#jealous
Keep up the good work whatever you choose
Just hate #b***h

(11)(6)

Anonymous

The negative comments on here are laughable – firstly, why knock someone who is pursuing two things he quite clearly enjoys?

He’ll know himself he can’t be both a lawyer and a musician but there’s nothing wrong with working hard and keeping options open. Also, questioning his commitment is beyond futile – being VP and now a brand manager are extra-curricular roles that demonstrate discipline, nous and dedication.

As for his music, if you don’t like it, you don’t have to listen it – nobody is putting a gun to your head!

Food for thought – if knowing how to market yourself over FB, Twitter, Youtube etc isn’t being commercially aware (it clearly is), then I don’t know what is.

(11)(2)

Anonymous

WELL SAID

(8)(3)

Former QMLS member

Gary’s a friendly, cheerful chap – never got the opportunity to hang out and get to know him, but from what we spoke at events and the like he seemed spot on. Best of luck to him!

(8)(7)

Inspired!

Having other interests outside of law is bound to make him MORE appealing to law firms! It shows dedication, perseverance and commitment – to both law and his music! Law firms are looking for individuals who are willing to work hard and put the effort in – clearly shown by his ability to both get the grades and create a media presence for himself and his music.

The amount of experience, both legal and non-legal, that he will gain from this is exceptional, and, knowing him, he will use this experience wisely! Why would he turn down an offer to pursue his interests?!

Why wouldn’t law firms be attracted to such a diverse individual who has shown immense commitment and has put in the hard work? This doesn’t show ‘partial commitment’, it shows someone who is being realistic and is exploring different avenues that he could follow – good on him!

(8)(4)

Anonymous

Here here……good post

(5)(2)

Anonymous

Hear, hear.

(3)(2)

Anonymous

X-factor audition, article in legal cheek, former vice law president and still no vac scheme my heart goes out to Gary. #KeepTrying

(6)(9)

Anonymous

He didn’t apply for any

(10)(4)

Anonymous

correct
If you knew him you would know

(6)(3)

BKhan

#PeakTimes

(6)(0)

Sarah

Live and let live!

(3)(2)

Luke skywalker

Hey Garry stay strong bro. You’re a good kid you got potential. Don’t let anyone put you down.

(7)(0)

Anonymous

But that’s what we do on here…everyone get put down…no matter how good you are…don’t you know…Legal Cheek does wonders here because they are all failures!

(1)(0)

R2D2

Hey bro. Don’t let these haters get to you, they don’t know the rates you have at QM. Man like Garry Caprani ain’t no joke ✌️

(6)(0)

Anonymous

R&B singer…

(1)(0)

Anonymous

oi

(0)(0)

Anonymous

blhahhhhhh

(0)(0)

Anonymous

may as well write some rubbish to add to the comments above and the articles on here….

(0)(0)

Anonymous

now where’s my resit law book for my paralegal role at the CAB to match the intelligence of the commenters on here…

(0)(1)

Comments are closed.