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Berwin Leighton Paisner keeps 13 out of 20 qualifying trainees

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International law firm froze pay earlier this summer citing “political and financial uncertainty” created by Brexit

blp

Berwin Leighton Paisner (BLP) has revealed a disappointing autumn retention figure, hanging on to just 13 trainees from a cohort of 20.

The firm, which is best-known for high-end real estate work, confirmed that 20 wannabe lawyers started the training contract process, but only 18 saw it through to the end. Sixteen were eventually offered full-time associate positions, of which 13 accepted, equating to a final 2016 autumn retention figure of just 65%.

BLP — which offers around 45 training contracts each year through two intakes — has 12 offices in eight different countries, and currently pays its newly qualified (NQ) lawyers £66,000.

Eleven of the firm’s new recruits will be based in the firm’s London office. Finance, real estate and corporate will receive three each, while one will be heading into litigation and corporate risk. The final London-based NQ will be based within BLP’s tax team. Two new associates have qualified abroad, with one heading to the firm’s Abu Dhabi office and the other based out in Hong Kong.

Commenting on today’s result Anthony Lennox BLP’s training principal, said:

Qualifying is a huge milestone for lawyers and we’re pleased to welcome the 13 NQs who have joined our Firm. The quality of individuals coming through is outstanding and these new lawyers will boost our five main practice teams with two also moving internationally. Hong Kong trainees will now be a regular addition to our firmwide trainee intake and from September 2017 we will also have a Myanmar trainee on our programme.

Today’s news marks a drop from the firm’s spring performance. Again from a trainee cohort of 20, the international firm kept 70% or 14 of its NQs.

Earlier this summer BLP revealed it has pressed pause on pay increases for its London-based lawyers.

Pointing the finger firmly at Brexit, citing “political and financial uncertainty”, BLP’s managing partner Lisa Mayhew fired off an email to staff telling them that after “much thought and consideration” the firm had opted to “defer” salary reviews for a period of four months.

14 Comments

Anonymous

As a TC applicant right now can someone please explain why retention numbers are like this?! Are trainees going into the TC cocky/arrogant and cant handle the heat and therefore run out of the kitchen or is the TC just difficult and only for the best of the best?

Why did those 2 not complete?! That’s just shocking! 13/20!? WOW

(2)(4)

Baloo

Maybe they want to qualify as a solicitor elsewhere or they find the two years at that particular firm is not for them or they did not reach standards the firm is looking for. Remember it’s just a “training contract” and since it’s quite competitive, maybe they just wanted to secure a TC at a reputable firm but aspire to actually be an associate at another firm.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

Yeah, but it’s not very common to move during your TC – people usually just qualify at the firm they start their TC with and then move on qualification or within the first year or so.

And while it is competitive, once you are actually a trainee, you will, almost invariably, qualify – I have never heard of anyone, bar serious misconduct or some administrative cock-up, not having their training signed off by their own firm so they can’t qualify. It would be crazy for a firm not to sign-off on someone since it would be the firm which should have spotted and rectified any issues before the end of the TC.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

At least three went to US firms…

(3)(0)

Anonymous

There are loads of reasons for why people leave.

You can’t really get a feel for what city lawyers do until you’re on the job. Vacation schemes are not an accurate reflection of a career in law (just research tasks, really) and some people don’t even do vacation schemes, yet sign up for a two year TC! As a result, so many people don’t really understand what they’re signing up for as a trainee and beyond. Some people end up HATING the job/environment.

Some people will leave for more money/to a firm which is more suited to their professional interests. Some people are just not cut out for it (in terms of the skills/motivations needed)

Also, some people are happy to take any TC that comes their way.. It doesn’t mean that they won’t jump ship at the first sight of a better offer.

(8)(0)

Anonymous

You use too many exclamation and question marks.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

You reall are a patronising prat if you need to his explained…

(0)(1)

Anonymous

I think I remember reading about the two that quit during the TC, one went off to be a teacher and the other to join a different firm.

(8)(0)

Anonymous

Different intakes to be fair

(0)(0)

Anonymous

“Eleven of the firm’s new recruits will be based in the firm’s finance practice in London. Real estate and corporate will receive three each, while one will be heading into litigation and corporate risk. The final London-based NQ will be based within BLP’s tax team. Two new associates have qualified abroad, with one heading to the firm’s Abu Dhabi office and the other based out in Hong Kong. ”

Erm…. 13 being retained… Not quite sure about TC’s maths…

And really retention is only 11/20 if you discount the two palmed off overseas…

(1)(4)

Anonymous

The best part of this is that BLP have still fudged the numbers. One of the 20 isn’t even from their London intake…

(2)(0)

Anonymous

All 19 of those that trained in London completed their training contract. 1 of the 20 is a trainee in Hong Kong.

6 qualified elsewhere.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Almost. 19 in London intake. None left during. 12 stayed on qualification.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Oh c’mon the figures are not that bad. 16 out of 18 people were offered a permanent associate position, we are looking at the 88,88% of trainees.

(0)(0)

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