Advice

I got a 2:2 in my law degree because I suffered from depression, can I still get a training contract?

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I hope my degree result isn’t an insurmountable hurdle

depress

In the latest instalment in our Career Conundrums series, one law graduate wonders whether her 2:2 will spell the end of her solicitor dreams.

areer

I’m a recent law graduate from a redbrick university. Due to the severe depression I suffered in second year, and the resulting physical health problems of said depression in third year, I only managed to obtain a 2:2. However, my academic achievements prior to university were consistently high. In my first year, I believed there was nothing worse in life than getting a 2:2, but my depression has given me more life perspective and thankfully I wasn’t as gutted about my result as I thought I would be. That said, I’m aware that with around 70% of graduates obtaining 2:1s, I’m not exactly in the best position to embark on a legal career. I wanted to ask for advice on realistic routes into the legal profession given my circumstances, to be specific, whether it would be possible for me to secure a training contract after doing the LPC. Would a 2:2 prove an impassable barrier? And should I declare the mitigating circumstances which affected my academic performance?

If you have a career conundrum, email us with it to careers@legalcheek.com.

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109 Comments

Anonymous

Fake question.

(19)(19)

Anonymous

Dumb answer

(16)(5)

Anonymous

I wrote this so no, not really.

(9)(5)

Anonymous

Well that proves it then. Case closed!

(0)(2)

Anonymous

I’m stalking this thread because I need the advice, what’s your reason? Apart from being jobless

(2)(1)

Anonymous

First things first, I hope you’re feeling better nowadays and you should still be happy with the effort you put in to obtain that grade with all the factors effecting it.
Secondly, there may be some difficulty in you obtaining a training contract with your grade, however as you have been mainly a high achiever then you may be able to explain your poor performance through the mitigating box.
Thirdly, you can still achieve a training contract at a prestigious city law firm as long as you put the effort in and sell yourself.
I believe that no matter what you have a chance you just have to push yourself.

(54)(3)

Anonymous

Thank you. I’m feeling miles better than I was last year, and ready to put in the extra effort; I much prefer an uphill climb than being bed-bound 🙂

(19)(3)

Nigel Farage's 2nd chin

Nobody suffers depression in law. Anonymous must be correct.

(9)(36)

Mark Anderson

It may affect your chances if you are competing now for a training contract with a prestigious firm. But there are other routes to success and in a few years your degree will become irrelevant. Make sure you do something that contributes to your lifetime CV.

My 2:2 became irrelevant within a couple of years. A fellow law student who got a 2:2 has just been appointed as a High Court judge.

(57)(1)

Stallonar

Cool story brah, made me apply to become a judge.

(17)(13)

Interloper

I hope to f you got politely rejected… 😐

(7)(0)

Toby

Cum here often son?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Says more about judges than it does about 2:2s.

(1)(2)

Anonymous

Thank you for you comment Mark, I appreciate that I will probably have to take a different route to those who got 2:1’s but I don’t mind!

(8)(1)

Interloper

Best of luck. Sound like you deserve a break – I’m sure one will come 🙂

(4)(0)

Anonymous

To be fair I have seen some firms say on their FAQs that they are willing to take mitigating circumstances into account, and I would honestly say that in situations like this, what uni you went to makes quite a substantial difference, 2.2 from an ex-poly would be over-ambitious to say the least however 2.2 from a russell group or to be fair a fairly well respected uni in general wouldn’t have the same ‘stigma’ per se.

(11)(9)

Anonymous

What do “to be fair” and/or “per se” add to your response?

(13)(21)

Anonymous

What does your comment add to the discussion (other than highlighting that you are a d*ck)

(65)(2)

Anonymous

The fact that you have to pick on something so irrelevant shows that you have no valuable point to add to the discussion so therefore act like a pedantic moron desperately trying to involve yourself in the conversation by making what you falsely believe to be a sophisticated response.

(15)(2)

Anonymous

To the original commenter, thank you for the heads up. I’ll use this as a way to decide which firms to apply to 🙂

(6)(0)

Anonymous

Probably not

(3)(4)

N

Same thing happened with me. I applied to do a LLM which set me in good stead – I did really well in that and then I went on to work in a personal injury law firm, then moved down to London to work as a Paralegal in probate. I then studied the LPC part time whilst working full-time as a Paralegal. It was hard work but it paid off . I have two great qualifications under my belt (as well as my 2:2) and I have had a lot of training contract interviews. So if you work hard for a couple of extra years more to bulk up your CV, you should do well in realising your dream. x

(26)(2)

Anonymous

But do you have a training contract?

(14)(2)

Anonymous

Thank you for the encouragement! I hope the interviews went well 🙂

(5)(1)

Anonymous

Have you now recovered? I would wait until you’ve fully recovered, then do a Master’s and ace that.

(8)(0)

Anonymous

Yeah I’m at about 80-90% now. I was thinking of doing a masters but I read comments from a few people who said that doing a masters to “make up” for your undergrad degree isn’t wise. Nonetheless I think I’ll wait a year or two so that I can be sure. Thank you 🙂

(4)(0)

Anonymous

Yes, I would agree with that usually – as in some people think they can get a 2.2 (no mitigation) and that adding a Master’s will undo that when it won’t. Your situation is different because you won’t just be adding a Master’s, you’ll be doing well in one and thereby (1) showing that you have fully recovered and (2) showing that it was your illness that caused you to get a 2.2.

(11)(0)

Anonymous

Would it not be quite difficult to get into a good university for a masters with a 2.2?

(3)(1)

Anonymous

See what you can do with your mitigation! Good luck to you

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Those are good points. I was thinking of doing a masters in international law as the international law based modules were the ones I enjoyed most during my undergrad. Thank you everyone 🙂

(3)(0)

Anonymous

I had a 2:2 and a pass at LPC … I still had a training contract and qualified as a solicitor.

(24)(4)

Anonymous

Irwin Mitchell doesn’t count.

(29)(2)

Anonymous

Are you white and middle class?

(15)(2)

Anonymous

And a man?

(11)(2)

Anonymous

Is that you Katie?

(6)(2)

Anonymous

Cases like this are the this is the reason all my instructions are terribly prepared and miss crucial points. (Obviously it’s different if there were genuine mitigating circumstances; but if there’s no way those grades should enable such career progression.)

(2)(6)

Anonymous

*are the reason

Whoops.

(3)(3)

Anonymous

Maybe you’re just a crap barrister which is why you get instructed by crap sols.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

No. Your briefs are probably prepared by pataweasels. Not solicitors with a 2.2

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Hogan Lovells partner?

(1)(0)

Somebody

Let’s just say, you face a bigger up hill climb. Short answer, yes. It is not impossible to get a TC with a 2:2 however, it’s best to work the ladder. Get yourself into a firm in a low position job, something like helpline etc. Work your way up, in no time you can be a paralegal and then after sometime, the more practical experience you have in the field, the more diminishing the 2:2 is. The one thing recruiters look for more than academics, is practical legal experience. I do know someone who has obtained a 2:2 and yet they’re an insolvency paralegal… It will take time and work but if you truly want to be a solicitor, persistence pays off! Good luck, and don’t f*ck it up!

(15)(2)

Anonymous

Thanks for the advice, I don’t fancy messing up again any time soon 😀

(4)(1)

Anonymous

Although my background is Bar-oriented (LLB, LLM and BPTC, now hunting for pupillage) I can relate to the person who asked the question – At the tail end of my final year of undergraduate studies, a string of misfortune sent me spiraling into an intense depression. I emerged from it after about a year and a half, but it hamstrung my Masters studies.

A 2:2 is certainly going to make things harder for you. However, I wouldn’t go as far as suggesting it imposes an impassable barrier between you and a legal career. I had a friend who had a 2:2 from an ex-poly (with no other academic achievements), but because of a few interesting items on his CV (volunteering as a translator at Court, for one) he was offered a pupillage interview at a prestigious chancery set. Grades do matter, but candidates can pick up the slack elsewhere.

It sounds as if you’re picking yourself back up and feeling a little better – use that energy to engage in other work which will make your CV stand out. If there’s one thing I’ve learned in what is now the fourth year I’ve dedicated to reaching the Bar, it’s that persistence is absolutely key to success.

Stay strong, it’s a tough road.

(14)(0)

Anonymous

Redbrick University? Never heard of it

(5)(9)

lpc student.

you are all so mean on legal cheek comments, no manners, nothing . you got 2:1’s but no manners ,kidness or respect, being shitty bad persons. sadly no 2:1 can buy you manners folks.

(29)(5)

Anonymous

And whatever you paid for education did not buy you good grammar.

(10)(9)

Anonymous

unbelievable how rude someone can be .

(9)(1)

Toby

Apply ointment to the burn.

(3)(2)

MD

I think it’s going to be very difficult without personal connections at perhaps smaller regional firms. Too many people get 1st class degrees and 2:1s… that’s usually the first hurdle to overcome.

(4)(3)

Anonymous

With training contracts agreed two or more years in advance by many firms, secure the contract before signing-up to do the LPC. Getting a place on an LPC is not the challenge; getting the training contract is. In my own experience, with a 2:2, getting an interview at the training firm was the key. It’s not all about academic results (though that may stop you getting through the ‘sift’ of applications at many firms) it’s also about your attitude, presentation, ability to work with the team, people, clients, etc. This is, above all else, a people business. The 2:2 never held me back – on the contrary, 25 years later, I now own the firm.

(20)(1)

Anonymous

Alan, is that you?

(2)(0)

Anonymous

I have a friend who got a 2:2 and she worked as a paralegal for a couple of years at a medium sized firm before going on to get a training contract at a big firm! Don’t be disheartened!

(11)(0)

Em

Work as a paralegal. It’s invaluable. I got a 2:2 then paralegalled for a year before applying for TCs. With some dedication, a lot of effort when applying (very selectively) and plenty of evidence of my hard work as a paralegal, I managed to obtain one.

As a paralegal, really get stuck in instead of just coasting. The more you absorb in terms of the inner-workings of a law firm, processes etc, the more commercial awareness you will inevitably have. This really helps to set you apart from other applicants as you have genuine insight to offer, instead of just platitudes and empty statements about why you’re so brilliant and deserving.

Be realistic, not idealistic though.

It is possible, so keep at it. It’s easy to become demoralised. If you want it badly enough, you can probably make it happen!

Good luck!

(11)(1)

Anonymous

I am a City law firm recruiter and I recommend explaining what skills and strategies you have developed as a result of your depression. Firms will be worried that you won’t be able to cope with working under pressure, but you may well have developed more coping strategies than someone who has not suffered from a mental illness. Highlight how you are now in a better place to manage stress, that you know how to organise your work and you are able to take better care of yourself having gone through depression.

At interview, you should not be asked about your depression, but if you raise it, the interviewer may want to ask what you have learned about yourself, what skills you have, etc. They can ask questions to determine whether a candidate has the ability to do the job, but they should be questions linked to trainee competencies and they should ask them of all candidates. This may well include questions about your resilience and ability to work under pressure, but don’t be defensive – tackle the issue head on.

(19)(0)

Anonymous

Thank you for clarifying this. I can’t deny I was uneasy about making it known to law firms that I had depression as I am fully aware of the stigma that is attached, but I will think about ways to approach and answer the questions that you raised. Thanks again 🙂

(1)(0)

Anon

Some very good advice here but also some very twatty comments by some v immature people!! I graduated with a 2:2, gained work experience during uni with law firms and voluntary organisations and have just qualified as a solicitor. Network as much as you can while you are doing ur LPC and don’t rule out small firms.

(17)(0)

Jade

The CPS now accepts graduates with a 2:2 for the training contract scheme.

(6)(2)

Bitter N. Twisted

Give your degree back. Do an apprenticeship instead, you wouldn’t believe the cranks we’ve got at our place in our first intake…but they’all be debt free cranks. FFS.

(3)(4)

Bitter N. Twisted

*they’ll (sic) before the pedants strike…

(0)(3)

Pedant striking

“Sic” is used incorrectly – it is used when making a quote with a mistake in it, not for corrections.

(8)(0)

Anonymous

Well done on sticking with the degree.

I’m from the other branch of the profession, but it would surprise me if there is not some mechanism for taking this into account at most firms. That said, there is a difference between theory and practice here, and there will no doubt be firms which state they take mitigating circumstances into account but in reality do anything but. I’d suggest that a good starting point would be to speak to HR reps wherever possible at training contract fairs and, if not there, by way of an email. Be up front about what happened and ask what the firm’s attitude would be. The tone and content of the response should tell you a lot.

(6)(0)

Anonymous

Get some good paralegal experience and go from there. Don’t be disheartened. It won’t be easy to get a training contract; I think it is a challenging process for most people, even those with great grades.

I got a 2:2 not because of mitigating circumstances, but because I was rather lazy and immature at the time and simply didn’t work hard enough (this deservedly resulted in rather a lot of anguish when going through the TC application process later on).

I spent a couple of years as a paralegal, added some good entries to my CV, and am now in my second seat at a City firm.

Best of luck.

(14)(0)

Anonymous

Thank you for your encouragement 🙂 Will definitely remember this going forward

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Winston Churchill suffered from depression but he didn’t give up.

“KBO!” as he would say.

Don’t give up.

🙂

(5)(1)

A barrister

Have not read the other comments. But I have two thoughts.

– I’d think hard before telling firms that you got a 2.2 because of depression. MH problems are stigmatised sadly. Law is largely not a friendly, liberal profession. Mentioning depression might count against you more than the bad grade I’m afraid. Is there a way you can honestly present your under-performance as mitigated by something else – a triggering event, a physical health problem (I am obviously not suggesting lying, just emphasising something other than the MH aspect if this is possible while still being honest).

– friend of mine got a 2.2 in law from a redbrick university. She did a masters in an area she liked and wanted to specialise in and got a high 2.1 in that, spent a couple of years teaching English abroad and learning a foreign language, spent another couple of years paralegalling and also doing a few unpaid work experience spots and generally networking and impressing. Then she got a TC at the firm she paralegalled at – a large-ish regional firm that is extremely well-respected in its area of specialism (the subject of her masters).

I think my friend’s approach was good. She built up her CV both academically and personally, didn’t obsess about the 2.2 and TC (you can’t put your life on hold) but also kept it in mind as an ultimate goal.

(5)(1)

Anonymous

Hi, I appreciate your comments greatly, so thank you. I did have a triggering event in second year which I could mention, as I agree with you that MH problems are stigmatised which is why I asked whether it would be worth declaring it. I did actually get a 2:1 overall in third year, just not a good enough 2:1 to makeup up for my dismal second year results. I plan on doing as your friend and take my time to build up my CV academically and personally 🙂

(2)(0)

Anonymous

makeup for*

(0)(0)

Chancery tenant

It isn’t about “not declaring” it, I think it is more to do with how you explain it and relate it to your performance. Obviously there are sensible ways to let firms know about mitigating circumstances. It is unwise, however, to simply say that depression caused you to get a 2:2, because it can look tactless. Explain that you had health problems and give a detailed explanation of *why* this meant you did not do as well. How well were you expecting to do? How did you do in 1st year? Did you get any really excellent grades when you were well?

I think if you did get good grades in 1st year (e.g. 68+) then I would be more open to looking into the mitigating circumstances. If your grade profile is basically the same (a smattering of 58s and 62s all through the three years) then it might not come across as genuine.

The point is that the Firm still has to have some point of reference. You sometimes see people who say “oh well X happened” and actually their performance is the same through the whole degree.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

I know how bad depression is- I was lucky to get a 2:1 despite heavy depression my entire degree (I pretty much deferred every single exam which really helped, but it was a complete nightmare).
Then came the LPC, and the depression finally overpowered me and I just passed every module which is kind of like getting a 2:2.
I spoke to several recruiters who told me to put it in the mitigating circumstances box, and although I was invited to several interviews, I’m yet to get a TC or Vac scheme. I don’t mean to discourage you, but I think the reality is, whilst on paper law firms make themselves out to be very open-minded, in reality some of the Partners have stereotypes over mental illness. All the feedback I got was vague, and thats the conclusion I have come to.
I know I’m not really giving any advice – maybe because I’m kind of in the same boat. I’m just going to carry on, still put the depression in the mitigating circumstances box and hope I meet some interviewers who don’t have such prejudices towards mental health.

Thankfully my depression is gone for a year now but obviously dented my record. My advice would be: exercise a lot (helps with endorphins/chemicals), go out even if its just to get a single apple, make sure you keep up your appearance and take pride in it/yourself, keep busy (I got a low paying non-graduate job, but it kept me busy) and if you are still unwell, don’t attempt the LPC or any other course now or you might end up in my situation. Really wish you all the best!

(8)(0)

Anon.2

Basically in the same situation as you! Good advice/help to give someone else to prevent any triggering issues

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Hi, hope you’re feeling better. I was able to obtain a TC through a diversity scheme which took into account mymitigating circumstances in the past. I would also suggest an organisation called “Aspiring Solicitors” who will be able to offer some advice and assistance in getting over the threshold in some firms.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

Thank you, I’ll definitely check out Aspiring Solicitors. Wish you all the best 🙂

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Diversity rocks

(0)(0)

Anonymous

I have a hobby horse to let out here:

There is a programme on BBC I player called “the Doctor who gave up drugs”. It gives an excellent insight into how Drs diagnose and treat depression, and how to recover from it without them.

Personally I think depression is a new word for “grim reality” a lot of the time.

So, I would hope that you can address your grim reality.

If you are only 80 – 90 percent recovered, I would put a hold on things…it may be that the TC pressure is part of the 20%.

See if there is a graduate job that you can start…you have already run a race, see if you can get a prize as you are.

There is something to be said for someone who has made a comeback in life and is grounded. You would likely be trusted with more responsibility in the workplace. You may find a job more fun and you may build better relationships than at LPC and in the paralegal game.

If you are still not truly well, give yourself a break and think of the notion of “a blessing in disguise”.

A lot of people will be well meaning on here, including me. However, you are facing the world in 2016 – you need to check with employers, not us, about your TC. That detail aside, I would stick with first principles: Have you addressed the grim reality cause (if applicable), have you factored in the I Player point that GP Drs are counter productive a lot of the time, have you considered the blessing in disguise idea, can you get a prize for the combination of the 2.2 and surviving depression ?

(5)(0)

Anonymous

Thank you got your insightful reply, I will definitely check out the programme. I’ve managed to pass through the “grim reality”, just have to get to the bottom of the physical problems as a result of my depression, which I’m close to doing. I appreciate that you are cautious about being over optimistic about my chances, as this could work against me, and have considered it may also be a blessing in disguise. I’ll do as you suggested and check with employers 🙂

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Any recruiters/ lawyers here honestly tell us how firms etc feel about mental illness as a mitigating factor? When something like depression or anxiety appears on an application, does this lead the reader to think we are less able?

(2)(0)

Anonymous

I’m a barrister, married to another barrister. We have both sat on our different Chambers’ pupillage committees for the past few years.

We do theoretically take mitigating circumstances into account, but there are so many good applicants with firsts, that it doesn’t make much practical difference. And it’s far more likely to be applied to physical-only health problems, if at all.

I also think that there is a very wide-spread view at the Bar that you need to show you can “take the pressure” and “stand up for the job”. Depression will be considered by *many* (and that definitely doesn’t mean all barristers, but it does included a lot) as showing a lack of strength and resilience, making you unsuitable for the Bar. Many will equate “not doing as well as expected in your degree” with “failing your clients”.

So yes. Many barristers will think that someone with a history of anxiety or depression is a weak candidate. On the other side, if you don’t mention any careful, good reasons as to why you got a 2.2, there is no chance.

It’s not hopeless. But I do think it means you aren’t looking at the straight-in route. You need to get either further academic qualifications (a good LLM would certainly help at my Crime-only set) or good, solid, demonstrable legal work experience, paralegal, for a law centre, etc.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

I solely own a small niche firm of 10 and we are growing rapidly. We’ve just recruited a trainee with a 2:2 and she’s turned out to be excellent. Conversly, I let someone go last year who had absolutely no aptitude. She had a 1st. Grades mean very little to me, it’s more about how well they do an interview and during the probation period. It’s a client facing role and if you’re good with clients, careful and creative and willing to work hard, you’re sure to have a successful career.

(8)(0)

Anonymous

Thank you for this. I have had client facing roles in the past and have been told by my previous employers and a customer service advisor that I performed well. I hope to work on this and use it to my advantage 🙂

(0)(0)

Anonymous

I got a 2.2, did the diploma in legal practice, got loads of voluntary experience, sent my cv to every smaller firm I could think of, got a traineeship with a large high street residential conveyancers, qualified & did notary public oath, got an NQ position with same firm, got active on LinkedIn, got headhunted for a large litigation firm. Just keep swimming! Best of luck professionally and with your mental health xxx

(5)(0)

Anonymous

Wow that’s great, well done to you! Thank you for the encouragement 🙂

(1)(0)

Of course you can

I got a 2.2 because I picked a degree that I had little interest in. Did the GDL. got loads of paid legal work experience over three years, secured a TC, and then began the lpc part time. There is no reason why you can’t make it if you want it badly enough.

(2)(0)

The Lyle

Please do not approach the profession unless you are certified sane by two psychiatrists.

There are two many loonies in the profession as is evinced here.

What firm will hire a loony?

Loonies also cannot tell the difference between an aggravation and a mitigation.
See the Anu Singh Case
Histories case
And the plethora of asylum cases put b forward by loony solicitors on the basis that their client is loony, when that is a specific ground to deport an alien under the Lunacy Act 18something as incorporated into the immigration rules.
Because a loony will be placed in a loony bin if deported is not persecution. It is protection of the UK from being swamped by foreign loonies and of the country of origin from having loonies at large. Cor Blimey! The things you have to explain.

(0)(6)

The Lyle

Pistorious.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

There are two issues here. How to get over the competition with a 2:2 , and how to convince wary employers that you will not be beset with Anxiety/Depression issues under pressure of work. Several posts have suggested the best solution ie get yourself into a legal firm in any paralegal position and prove yourself so that any firm recruiting will be able to see that neither is an issue.

(However while you do that do make sure that it really is what you want to do and that you are not just pursuing it because in some way it seems like giving up to move into something different. )

(2)(0)

Anonymous

(However while you do that do make sure that it really is what you want to do and that you are not just pursuing it because in some way it seems like giving up to move into something different. )

I’m not the OP, but I’m really struggling with this, personally.

Done some vacation schemes (MC/US), and really not sure if I’m that interested. However, I feel like I’ve pigeonholed myself into law, since I’ve graduated now. (without a TC)

(0)(0)

Anonymous

My dad got arrested two weeks before my exams in my second year and I too had depression. I walked out with a 2:1. Yeah it was emotional as fuck for the next 1.5 years of law school and I had shit loads of other stuff happening besides my dad going jail and I got on with it. You just get the fuck on with it.

(1)(6)

Anonymous

Theres depression and then there’s depression

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Keep your head up

(0)(0)

Tupac

I didn’t choose the thug life, the thug life chose me.

(3)(0)

Whoopdeedoo for you

Shame on you for your lack of empathy. Feeling shit because your dad’s in jail isn’t depression. Depression can drain all motivation, concentration, ability to retain information. That’s likely to affect anyone’s performance.

(7)(0)

Anonymous

Missed an opportunity to work with your dad’s lawyer…..

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Good for you

(2)(0)

The Lyle

I’m a loony and my dad is in jail .

(0)(1)

Anonymous

I had an ex who got a 2:2 because he was lazy. Rather sadly (but fortunately timing wise), his dad died towards the end of his degree so he used that as his mitigating circumstances for bad grades (even before then). And it worked. He also met up with a partner he knew at the firm he liked and charmed her. She went to HR and said he should be on the vac scheme where he was able to make enough of an impression to get a TC.
I guess another way in would be to paralegal if the TC route fails and prove yourself. I found (even training at a top firm), the odd trainee was lazy and if you get in with a partner who has a big mouth (generally the ones who are the great networkers) and will sing your praises, that can go some way with the TC route.
In short, though depression should have no stigma, if there is anything you could link it to family wise, I’d try to as it’s easier for ignorant people to understand. Otherwise, just go for it. If you really want it, you will make it happen 🙂

(3)(0)

Anonymous

If you have a 2:2 then make sure you have something else to offer to the average TC applicant you are competing against with a 1st or 2:1.

It can be an LLM, ridiculously high billing as a paralegal, a connected family member pulling in a favour, etc.

A sob story on it’s own won’t be enough.

(7)(0)

The Lyle

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(8)

Anonymous

Please kindly fuck off you unfunny and insensitive twat.

(3)(0)

Lyle of Myoclonic Counsel

I have encountered psychiatric cases hitherto unknown to medical science. CAD is my baby:- Compulsive Abuse Disorder, as is pervasive in this site, but I have also come across cases that befuddled the leading experts in the land, like the barrister wont to suffer hour long myoclonic convulsions throughout his whole body, which could happen at any time. He was the terror of the Industrial Tribunals and held the record for the longest IT case ever, which he won after 16 years I think. His client was awarded £5 or something. We got on well though, but he insisted on making no money, “on principal”. I never found out what this principal was.

(0)(2)

Lyle of Myoclonic Pedatiousness

Que Pedant attack and compulsive abuse

(0)(1)

Anonymous

Lord Lyle of Cupcake, u got zero bantz homie.

Suck ur mum

(1)(1)

Anonymous

I think it’s important to consider where you want to work. I did get a 2:1 but a very low one (61%) due to suffering endocarditis in my finals. I realised due To my health I was not suited to city life I couldn’t work in an environment that stressful and also my grades were not good enough for the city. I looked at local firms I found a local firm which I loved the look of. I was offered a training contract and I absolutely love it i am working in the commercial property department. Look for smaller firms not only will they not judge your grades but theY will be much more understanding of your illness

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Caterwauling Lyle of Ctuhulu Wingnut

@Anon @ 7.58pm. I usually don’t converse with anonymous people as they all seem to be the one person disembogueing meaningless gratuitously abusive mind burps, but you managed a whole coherent paragraph. I wonder could you further distinguish yourself by assigning a discernible moniker to your posts.

Endocarditis is not a mental illness, however if it is chronic, it will incapacitate you in your work and your employer may lawfully sack you.

Your chief asset is in your sanity, pleasantness and clear English. As long as your medical condition does not incapacitate you, I am sure you are an asset to your firm.

Loonies are an entirely different kettle of fish and can foster a life threatening and firm threatening atmosphere of terror and mayhem in the office , the home and among the public.

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Anonymous

Just to add to the comments about becoming a paralegal as a route to a training contract, which can be a really good idea in circumstances such as this – it may sound obvious but is often ignored: it is critical that those within the firm see you as a trainee/ solicitor in waiting, not someone who is just there for the short term before moving onto something else. This can manifest itself in all sorts of ways, but in particular how you dress. It is difficult because paralegals are not generally paid well. But if you look like a lawyer people will see you as a lawyer. Look like a bundler and people will give you bundling.

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Anonymous

I got a 2:1, my class mate got a 2:2, she is now doing better than I am! I would definitely declare your mitigating circumstances if I were you. I certainly wouldn’t do a masters just to try and make up for your grade. Personally, I’d apply for lots of vac schemes and work placements (citing mitigating circumstances in application forms and covering letters there, too) and hope that demonstrates to the employer that you’re dedicated.

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Screaming frenzy I

Being a loony is not a mitigation. No one will hire a loony. Get real dudes and dudettes

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Anonymous

Stfu idiot. Being depressed does not make one a “loony”.

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Anonymous

Not getting enough action in the bedroom?

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Lyle I f

Thank you Screaming Frenzy for your sanity.

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