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Research: Oxford graduates top law school earnings power table, pocketing £61,500

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Government data reveals vast pay gap among LLB holders

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New research has revealed that University of Oxford law graduates are earning an average salary of £61,500, firing them to the top of the law school earnings table.

The government statistics show that those who studied at Oxford take home, on average, £61,500 five years post-graduation. Hot on their tails are law graduates from the University of Cambridge, who earn a median salary of £54,500 — a full £7,000 less than their Oxbridge rivals.

Rounding off the podium positions is the London School of Economics, from which law grads pocket around £47,500 at the same point in their careers.

But there are a few surprises in the department of education research. The stats — which focus on students who graduated between 2008 and 2009 — suggest that law students who studied at the Open University (£30,000) go on to earn more than those who studied at the University of Leeds (£27,000) and the University of Liverpool (£24,500), both of which are Russell Group members.

Sitting at the foot of the table is the University of Bradford. The data shows that five years post-graduation Bradford’s alumni take home a median salary of just £17,500. Emphasising the vast earnings gap among law graduates, that equates to a whopping £44,000 less than their Oxford counterparts.

Sitting just above Bradford is the University of Bedfordshire (£18,000), the University of Derby (£18,500), and the University of Wolverhampton (£19,500).

The results in full

UNIVERSITY AVERAGE LAW GRAD PAY FIVE YEARS AFTER GRADUATING
Oxford £61,500
Cambridge £54,500
LSE £47,500
UCL £47,000
Warwick £41,500
Durham £40,500
Nottingham £38,000
Bristol £37,500
King’s College London £37,000
Manchester £35,500
Exeter £34,500
Sussex £34,000
Southampton £33,000
Queen Mary £31,500
Birmingham £30,500
Newcastle £30,500
Surrey £30,500
Birkbeck £30,000
UEA £30,000
Open University £30,000
Oxford Brookes £30,000
Reading £29,500
Brunel £28,000
Sheffield £28,000
Kent £27,500
City £27,000
Leeds £27,000
Leicester £26,500
Essex £26,000
Canterbury Christchurch £25,500
Gloucestershire £25,500
Northumbria £25,500
Portsmouth £25,000
Westminster £25,000
Bournemouth £24,500
Liverpool £24,500
West London £24,500
Greenwich £24,000
Kingston £24,000
Lancaster £24,000
UWE £24,000
Anglia Ruskin £23,500
Keele £23,500
Nottingham Trent £23,500
Hull £23,000
Sheffield Hallam £22,500
Hertfordshire £22,000
Central Lancashire £21,500
Coventry £21,500
Liverpool John Moores £21,500
Manchester Met £21,500
Plymouth £21,500
Chester £21,000
East London £21,000
Leeds Beckett £21,000
London South Bank £21,000
Northampton £21,000
Southampton Solent £21,000
Staffordshire £21,000
Sunderland £21,000
Teeside £20,500
De Monfort £20,000
Huddersfield £20,000
Lincoln £20,000
London Met £20,000
Middlesex £20,000
Birmingham City £19,500
Buckinghamshire £19,500
Edge Hill £19,500
Wolverhampton £19,500
Derby £18,500
Bedfordshire £18,000
Bradford £17,500

36 Comments

Anonymous

Although this is somewhat interesting, the data samples sizes for some universities are pretty questionable, and it doesn’t take into account those working outside of the UK, nor those who are self-employed.

From the same report, the data on the percentages of alumni who are not employed brings up some far more unexpected results, although again the data and way they are measuring employment is again a little dubious.

(5)(1)

Anonymous

I think consideration needs to also be given to students at the Open University, who are more likely to be in employment in any event.

There should also be consideration of the fact that outside of Oxbridge, it is more common for students to be part time or distance learning.

Wasn’t there a piece published not too long ago that suggested that the average salary amongst a LSE LLB Grad would be upwards of £100K 12 months after graduation? I think this is a more realistic study, but still not wholly effective.

(1)(2)

Bumblebee

I don’t regard the Open University’s position as a surprise. Open University students tend to be older and already have a career at the time they embark upon their course. Also, more OU students self-fund than at other universities.

If anything, I think it’s surprising that the Open University is so low in the ranking.

(3)(1)

Anonymous

I’m Open Uni student doing Law.and in my final year.
I earn double this at the moment. Why am I putting myself through this shit?

(1)(3)

Anonymous

‘Oxbridge’ rivals…?

(2)(1)

Oxoniensis

Well, they’re both part of Oxbridge, so yes – they are Oxbridge rivals.

(1)(1)

LLB waterloo

Good to see that my uni BPP isn’t even on the table. I assume that’s due that to the average BPP grad using BPP as a way to circumvate the home office while spending whole acacemic years with 0 tutorial prep and participation. Not even handing in a blank document on a hand it in and failing all exams but still being allowed to disrupt others who actually try and stay on the course for no other reason than to be a cash cow for BPP greedy shareholders

(4)(3)

Anonymous

Pretty sure BPP only received university status in 2010 and so wouldn’t have 5 year post graduates to collect data on.

(7)(0)

Anonymous

I understand that there are people at bpp who don’t prep for some classes etc, and are quiet in class.

What I don’t understand is how this negatively harms anyone else in the class who has prepped up to the eyeballs and participates 100% of the time???? The only person the slacker in the class is harming is themselves. They effectively exclude themselves from thee class and it’s like they are not even there.

Also, classes are designed to run on regardless and cater to / focus on the prep and exercises for those who have actually prepped, so no time is wasted explaining basic concepts.

I don’t understand why people get a bee in their bonnet over ppl who are (a) totally unprepared (b) are prepped but just quiet /not a legal prima donna (c) look foreign and are quiet, but have done work. – I don’t understand the anger directed at these categories of people as it harms no one but people who are in the (a) category.

(1)(1)

Anonymous

I don’t think it is an orthodox opinion to say that people who do not prepare for something have no effect on those that do.

Are you a Parliamentary candidate in a seat with a small minority looking to get a bounce from slackers and so praising them to get votes ?

This sort of point is one I associate with MPs in that predicament. Anyone disagree ?

(0)(2)

Anonymous

I think that people not participating does harm the other people in the group, if for no other reason than the lost opportunity. I enjoyed group sessions at uni because people argued the point and everyone has a slightly different perspective on matters.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

People who don’t prepare don’t contribute in group tasks. Seminars are a chance to share ideas. If three of you are working through an in-SGS activity and you’re the only one that is prepared…

(1)(0)

Anonymous

I am a BPP grad and wholly sympathise with your point. The level of unpreparedness and tbh sheer thickness was annoying, but I got a first by ignoring my peers and doing my own thing. Keep you head down and survive what is just a means to an end.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

It is a shame that we have not been treated to the wider UK universities…It would have been interesting to see Belfast, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, Cardiff, Swansea, Aberystwyth and others up there as well.

(9)(0)

Anonymous

Including Scottish unis wouldn’t be comparing like with like though, given the whole separate legal system business (although a couple of Scottish unis offer a joint honours Scots/English law LLB), and that the Scottish legal market is very different.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Most Trainees I know who went to Cambridge did non- law degrees , more common than those from Oxford .

(4)(0)

Anonymous

The table in the article should be a bonus for Faiz Siddiqui ‘s legal team against Oxford University. He should do a Freedom of Information request to the Government to ask for the underlying data for the Oxford stat, so that he can see what the top end were earning…

Go on Faiz, son !

(1)(1)

Anonymous

Oxford more likely to do commercial work and therefore pay more, not rocket science !

(0)(1)

Anonymous

Lol. The SOAS emiratis would put this table on its head

(3)(1)

Bumblebee

Respectfully, I don’t think you quite understand what a median average means.

(0)(2)

Anonymous

Respectfully, go fuck yourself

(4)(0)

BS Detector

“Hot on their tails are law graduates from the University of Cambridge, who earn a median salary of £54,500 — a full £7,000 less than their ***Oxbridge rivals***”

So Cambridge is not part of Oxbridge?

(4)(2)

Anonymous

Possibly the saddest comment I’ve read all year, especially in that you have misread the sentence

(7)(1)

Anonymous

Am I the only one that sees these figures as really high? Ok I’ve struggled to find decent employment since graduating and have relocated which set me back. But I’m earning half the average salary considering the uni I went to, doesn’t make me feel very good about myself.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

I think a lot of the top universities’ results will mask the results of the public school class. This class need to earn £10,000 to £30,000 extra per child to perpetuate themselves, by the time they are around 40 with secondary school age kids.
Connections and jobs where there is commercial remuneration will abound here. The commercial bar and City firms, as you know.

I would think that the likes of Sheffield is going to be more indicative of a comprehensive school wage, where a sizeable number did not have the connections or the inclination or the pre existing bourgeois tendency to aim for and settle in the City of London. (Sheffield is a great City but I would be surprised if the boarding school fraternity populate the law school and have had an effect on their £28,000 showing.)

Did you feel oK before you saw the results ?

The race is not to the swift nor the battle to the strong, both go to the pure in heart 🙂

(6)(0)

Anonymous

Actually quite a realistic ranking table to help sixth-form students decide which universities to read law at, if they want a career in one of the top firms.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Salary rate should go by ability, not by name of university.

(1)(0)

Admiral Akbar

Good luck with that

(1)(0)

Anonymous

UK is more “racist” in the education; not all grades were very fairly graded. Quite retarded in the 21st century when 20 years ago in North America indeed every kid should be respected and every child is equal.

(0)(5)

Lucifer Morningstar Deen

LOL You fucking what m8?

I don’t even think i finished with a first class personally, there were white kids far superior to my skill getting lower grades from the indian teachers, how do you explain that special snowflake?

If anything the school system these days is racist to white people, specifically straight white ones you know because you left wing thundercocks think they’re the devil.

I’m black/arab and got everything handed to me easily, in uni & at firms, i even think i was a diversity hire, i made damn sure i filled in ”Disabled” & ”Gay” for those extra cheeky diversity hiring points.

(4)(2)

Anonymous

I have never seen such ridiculous thing happened in an education system. Because UK is a hub for higher education, those judiciary / politicians such as those from Singapore, malay, etc would try to influence the education system by networking into the university, and those students got better treatment.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

So while it is not offensive to British that these “foreign” students can go to oxford, Cambridge, etc. and scored 1st, other “foreign” students, not matter how good they are, can be barred from scoring a 1st because it is offensive.

(0)(0)

University of Bolton LLB

Why isn’t my university on the list?

(3)(1)

It's all relative

To be fair, in Liverpool you can live like a king for £24K, whereas in London you live like a tramp for £61K

(4)(2)

Adam

Being a king of Dogshitville is equivalent to living like a tramp in London.

(2)(4)

O.U Graduate.

What outcry have you uttered about my person, you oafish brute? I shall cordially remind you that I was the best scholar in my law class at the Open University and I have been involved in several frivolous tea parties and courtroom disputes, and I have over 300 boxes of Earl Gray. I am proficient in the Simian school of diplomacy and I am the top linguist in my book club. Know that you resemble nothing in my eyes save for yet another uncultured mind. I will hasten your undisputed expiritation of the world with grace and finesse. The thought that you can retreat after jesting of such matters over the internet is laughable. As of this moment, I am telephoning a mutual friend to negotiate a swift and sure rebuttal to your argument so I would implore you to prepare yourself for the upcoming verbal deluge. The deluge that will no doubt saturate your life with discomfort. You are well and truly wrong, my good sir. My abilities of travel are unmatched, and I can recite over 700 lines from Shakespeare, and that is just from Hamlet. The amount of knowledge that I have acrued is vast, and I shall use it to firmly state my authority on such matters, you rapscallion. Truly, I wished you had some semblance of knowledge on the matter you have brought up and it’s repercussions. Alas, you did not, and now you will suffer a fate most dire, you plebian. I shall defecate concentrated dislike upon you and you shall struggle to survive in it’s waters. Pistols at dawn, old boy.

In all seriousness, i earn more than £30k, odious alex m8.

(1)(0)

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