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Student used ‘fraudulent’ first class Oxford Brookes law degree to get onto Queen Mary LLM

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Brookes confirms wannabe barrister failed to ‘complete her studies’

An investigation has been launched after it emerged that a Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) masters student has been relying on fraudulent documents.

Hani Hussein, who landed a place on QMUL’s criminal justice LLM back in September, appears to have told course providers that she is the holder of a first class LLB from Oxford Brookes.

A photograph (below) purporting to be of Hussein’s Oxford Brookes degree certificate has been doing the rounds on Twitter.

A spokesperson for Oxford Brookes told Legal Cheek:

The University is aware that a former student, who did not complete her studies at Oxford Brookes, has used fraudulent documents in an application to another institution. During her time at Oxford Brookes, the student had not completed the requirements for a degree and was therefore, not awarded the qualification.

Hussein’s Twitter, which has since been deleted, contained a number of claims. In her bio section it stated that she was a “1st Class Law Graduate”, “BPTC Graduate”, “LLM Criminal Justice Student at Queen Mary University” and “Future Pupil Barrister”. On Facebook Hussein also states that she studied the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) at The University of Law.

Queen Mary University of London has issued this official comment on the matter:

QMUL is aware of allegations concerning a potentially fraudulent application to study at the university. We take all allegations of application fraud extremely seriously and have robust procedures in place to investigate each case. We are unable to comment on individual investigations.

A spokesperson from the University of Law said:

We are aware and can confirm that the matter has been referred to the Bar Standards Board for full investigation.

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214 Comments

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(9)(21)

Anonymous

Anonymous – shut up m8

(5)(6)

Anonymous

Mate, that is below the belt. You cant go round judging people on their names or religion. Sort ya self out!

(64)(9)

Pepe Uber Alles

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(5)(7)

Anonymous

Christians are just as likely to do bad things as Muslims. Look around you, you ignorant fool.

(68)(56)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(13)(15)

Anonymous

Idiot. Terrorists aren’t Muslims.

(19)(33)

Anonymous

No True Scotsman fallacy.

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

Asif

HOW DARE YOU CRITICISE THE RELIGION OF PEACE!!!

Tanyel

You are so, so ignorant.

Anon

The majority of “terrorists” are rich white men.. or can you not see that yet?

think before you judge

They are not Muslims. They are Muslims by NAME. There is a difference.
Has it ever occurred to you that things may be a lot deeper than you think? This is just the tip of the iceberg. They CLAIM to be Muslims to attach a negative stigma to Islam. Because they want to stain religion with their filth and terror. Who funds them? Who are they?

Anonymous

I know, how can people not realise this?

When these people blow themselves up, in obedience to certain teachings of the Koran, they are clearly not doing so because they are in any way religious, but because they just want to help the alt-right besmirch Islam. Idiots!

Anonymous

I remember when a load of white Christians blew half of England up and another load went into several American schools and shot their class mates to pieces though.

(34)(8)

Anonymous

Exactly, and you hear about such incidents every day. Plus they quote the Bible while they’re doing it.

Anonymous

Do they? Examples please.

Anonymous

Sarcasm alert

Felix McElhone

Catholics… White *Catholics*

Anonymous

Catholics are Christians last time I checked

Felix McElhone

*whoosh* (:

Anonymous

At no point did Jesus call for anyone to be killed.

Except for those who harm children, who should have a millstone placed around their neck and be thrown into the sea.

Which would be fair enough IMHO.

Anonymous

Was Lord Harley a Muslim too? You ignored fuckwit

(7)(4)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(4)

Anonymous

Meanwhile, whatever happened to that Coyne character who set fire to the £20 note in front of a homeless person?

Has his tattered corpse been located yet?

(2)(0)

Anonymous

She also completed the BPTC and was Called last year. My understanding was also that she had pupillage, due to commence this year. Obviously, she may well have been lying about all this.

(26)(0)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(43)(0)

Anonymous

No way! I followed her on Twitter and had quite a few exchanges with her over the years. If this is all true, it’s a spectacular example of the elaborate fairytales people can spin on social media.

(38)(1)

Shoe-less Joe

Ditto.

This is hilarious

(3)(0)

The Rt Hon Lard Harley of Council

The Heir to Harley arises!!!

My spawn shall reap my revenge!!!!!

Mwhahahahaha!!!!

Montag

Her behaviour is entirely indicative of narcissism.

Sense of entitlement, grandiosity, repeated lying, inability to accept accountability for actions, arrogant and haughty behaviour, lacking empathy, does not recognise boundaries, magical thinking.

Social media is a huge facilitator for such disordered individuals – in terms of acquiring victims and propagating their deluded thinking.
Have a look here narcsite.com and see how much of this behaviour you recognise in people you know. They are everywhere

(16)(0)

Mary J

Yes fully agree. It seemed her entire basis for wanting to be a barrister was her view that this was impressive to others. If that is your entire motivation then lying is just as good as achieving.

This post has been moderated because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

Anonymous

also faking pupillage despite naming a set (pretty bold IMO!)

(34)(1)

A Bystander.

Which set did she claim to have got pupillage with?

(3)(0)

Anonymous

Red Lion Chambers

(11)(0)

Anonymous

Red lion

(5)(1)

Anonymous

I thought that was a pub?

jeez

Are you really linking her public Facebook?

(8)(4)

Pepe the Trumpenfrog

Deal with it you betacuck.

(5)(10)

Rzbg

Oh wow! This woman got like 2000 likes on Twitter when she said she passed the Bar. I’ve just checked though and she has deleted it. Oh very dear.

(12)(1)

Anonymous

How did she manage to get onto an LLM without academic references?

(44)(0)

Anonymous

And the BPTC. What’s scary is that she was very nearly Called to the Bar.

(24)(0)

Anonymous

if you’re going to fake a degree, why on earth would you fake it from Oxford Brookes?

(179)(5)

Anonymous

haha

(4)(0)

Anon

Obviously because it was the closest most accurate thing which could be verified that she went as she did attend that institution, just never finished.

(24)(0)

Anonymous

Because when you attend Oxford Brookes you tend to have a lower level of intellect and you wouldn’t think about these things.

(44)(25)

Felix McElhone

ra!

(4)(1)

NG Jinson

It’s obvious that Brooke’s is getting known of late forit’s good reputation on law studies .

(0)(4)

Anonymous

QMUL: “We have robust procedures in place to investigate”- yeah but obviously not in your admissions process.

(76)(2)

Anonymous

Bad publicity for the University of Law IF she did actually study her BPTC there. But then again, with such money-sucking institutions, it wouldn’t surprise me if they didn’t even bother to check the authenticity of her transcripts…

(42)(4)

Anonymous

I was in her BPTC cohort – she did actually study there, and claimed to have gotten an “Outstanding”.

(40)(2)

Anonymous

Would the result not have been published in the Times?

(5)(3)

Anonymous

It’s funny how many people in my year claimed to have sailed through but were never Called.

(5)(1)

Anonymous

Firstly, yeah she’s a fraud.

But a secondary point, people who post on social media about getting good grades are the worst kind of people. They really need to get over themselves.

(26)(1)

Anonymous

Quite sad the lengths ppl will go to just to appear ‘successful’. This is also a wake up call for the Legal industry. More and and more ppl from ‘non traditional backgrounds’ are faking credentials just to get in, which prompts the question: is the legal industry fairly accessible all who want to pursuit a career in law?

(29)(42)

Practising Barrister

I’m not sure that’s the question that arises here. She did do A levels and go to uni after all, and does not appear to be the sharpest tool in the box. Are you saying the legal industry should be accessible to all those who don’t come out with a good degree, as otherwise they will be forced to fake one?

(37)(1)

Anonymous

Goes to show that life is a bubble

(1)(0)

Practising Barrister

Plus, are you saying the Bar should be accessible to all those who want a career in it, regardless of aptitude?

(26)(0)

Anonymous

I disagree with her dishonesty and from what I have gathered she has lied about many other things. But I do understand and have read a few Legal Cheek stories of ppl from non traditional backgrounds lying on their CV just to get an interview. I think it’s quite sad that ppl go through such lengths because many chambers and law firms only recruit from a certain pool of people. There are many ppl with brilliant skills but hold 2:2 degrees or went to non Russell Group universities and have had to give up their dreams of a legal career. Lets face it, the legal industry is seriously lacking in diversity!

(17)(38)

Anonymous

Silly comment. I have a first from a Russell Group university and got an outstanding on the BPTC. I was raised in a council house by a family on benefits.

(64)(3)

Scouser of Counsel

No excuse for it at all.

I was a “diversity case” but still managed to get to the Bar without cheating.

Anonymous

Also a diversity case here, now in-house counsel for one of the UK’s leading brands.

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

Just Anonymous

The world does not owe you anything. Chambers and firms do not owe you anything. You are not entitled to your dreams just because you want them.

That might sound harsh, but it’s reality. And the sooner pupillage/training contract seekers realise that, the better. If you want these places, you have to earn them. Prove to chambers/firms that you deserve them. If there are objective deficiencies in your CV, then remedy them. By which I mean, prove to recruiters you are the best candidate despite those deficiencies.

You are responsible for your own life and your own achievements, and whining about how nobody recognises your greatness because you got the wrong grade/went to the wrong university, will get you nowhere.

(70)(1)

Anonymous

Quite right. Also, once you’re as far down the track as this person purportedly was, it seems flimsy to me to say that somehow her background was holding her back. What was holding her back was that she wasn’t / isn’t academically proficient enough to pursue the particular career she fancies. Too many people, on this website and in the world at large, appear to have forgotten that not everyone can have what they want all the time.

It’s quite irritating.

Pandora the Explorer

Absolutely agree regarding cheating — utterly immoral and contrary to the lofty ideals of the profession. There is no place for such stupid behaviour in any profession. Work hard and act with integrity, always.

But I cannot understand the Oxbridge fetish nor the refusal of most Chambers to even consider those who may be less able to demonstrate academic brilliance in the alien environment of an exam hall.

I accept barristers should be able to show academic rigor, and a flair for understanding / delivering legal arguments succinctly. However, I do not think an exam allows students to showcaae these skills nor do I see why the ability of the individual to do these things must hinge on exams.

Anonymous

Your post shows a distinct lack of understanding of a career at the Bar IMO.

Oxbridge ‘fetish’ – because they want the brightest and best. This is not to say that if you don’t go to Oxbridge you are not the brightest, but most at Oxbridge WILL be the brightest by virtue of having beaten off all the competition to get in, got the grades to then take up their offer, and then go through an Oxbridge education.

‘Alien environment of an exam hall’ sorry what? I dunno what school you went to, but at my high school we had exams in the exam hall every single year from year 7 until year 13. The exam hall was not an alien environment. How do you propose we make excuses for barristers who perform badly then in the ‘alien environment of a courtroom’ this argument simply does not wash.

If you are bad at sitting exams that’s unfortunate for you. But I personally think being a barrister and performing well in court is very much like an exam – it’s a constant test of being able to adapt, think on your feet, be extremely well versed in your subject content and be able to apply it at the drop of a hat. To answer questions you may not have been expecting and have not prepared for. Imagine trying to say to a client ‘sorry I lost your case, the environment was just alien to me’ it isn’t good enough. If you aren’t the kind of person who performs well in a pressured environment where you MUST think on your feet then sadly you would be better off considering another career. Not every career path you are interested in will be the one best suited to you and as someone has said above, you can’t always get what you want.

Cecil Flowerdew

I always poo myself when I enter an exam hall.

Can I get a special dispensation?

Anonymous

Ridiculous comment!

This post has been moderated because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

Anonymous

What’s a ‘non traditional background’?

(5)(1)

Anonymous

Apparently she was awarded a scholarship for her masters! A scholarship that could have been awarded to someone who actually deserved it..

(39)(1)

Anonymous

Crikey. Is that criminal offence level bad?

(17)(1)

Anonymous

Yes

(4)(0)

Marcos

Fraud by false representation. Transaction of utmost good faith? Thoughts anyone ?

(14)(1)

Practising Barrister

I was absolutely astonished when this broke. I followed her on Twitter mostly as outrage porn – namely, I found her level of smugness surprising and embarrassing. Her pinned tweet listed her “achievements” and at least twice a week she would do a tweet patting herself on the back about them (“I can’t BELIEVE I’m here with a FIRST CLASS DEGREE and a PUPILLAGE, FOLLOW YOUR DREAMS!”), and seas of adoring barrister wannabes would congratulate her. It was in hindsight peculiar but I never suspected a thing (albeit I could not find the Young Barrister of the Year Award she had allegedly been awarded by the Association of Women Lawyers before even commencing pupillage…I thought perhaps she was talking that up but not fabricating everything).

I also found her tweets vapid and more typical of hopeless wannabes – constant inspirational quotes. I thought my gut that this vapidness was odd was just prejudice or a lack of knowledge of the youf on my part.

Just bizarre.

(89)(1)

Anonymous

she faked that award too, it’s not even a thing AWB give out let alone to a person not even practising yet.

(13)(0)

Practising Barrister

I had gathered…!

(5)(1)

Anonymous

I thought this too, she was a bit too proud of herself, always taking pics in legal libraries…

(7)(0)

Anonymous

It’s reassuring that you’ve had these thoughts on vapid social media deliveries. It pains me.

(3)(0)

Santini

Also indicative of how most people do not recognise a narcissist because most people have a level of trust and honesty which causes them to accept what is being said or even if they see a red flag, they tend to explain it away in some fashion. This allows the narcissist to keep doing what they do and if on the rare occasion they are challenged, they lash out, isolate and ridicule their challenger (often aided by a brainwashed gang of hangers-on) and preserve the illusion that has been woven. The problem is she will have no insight into her behaviour and will regard any suggestion of wrong-doing, the need for change or correction as a massive criticism to her ego.

This post has been moderated because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

A few people on this thread have been talking about narcissism, and descriptions of her behaviour sound like they very roughly fit that bill. To me it sounds like she might suffer from real mental illness (N.B. my understanding of narcissism is that it’s a personality disorder, not a mental illness. Apologies if incorrect) and need help!!

(4)(1)

Lord Harley

Pfft, I can fabricate not only qualifications but entire peerages.

(40)(0)

Legally grey

This is hilarious! Thank you LC for a great Friday read. However, the comments are even more revealing and entertaining than the article!

(21)(1)

Bumblebee

Hi 🙂

You must be new here…

(38)(1)

Comedian

Or perhaps they must BEE new here…

*giggle*

(8)(4)

Anonymous

If you’ve down-voted this, you really need to lighten up a little!

(0)(3)

Marty McFly

Hey lighten up, jerk!

RR

The concern is that there is actually no proof of any of this. It seems to me that the #ExposingLawyers Twitter page is a “hate campaign” setup to intimidate, victimise and demoralise this supposed impersonator. The page is clearly not setup by a “professional” in the field as anyone in the legal profession would just make a report to the SRA or BSB and let the real investigators deal with it, not setup a Twitter account and start doing their own investigations.

I am shocked that Legal Cheek have actually published this article and actually respected their publication until now.

(6)(68)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(26)(1)

Anonymous

so why have they not done anything? if they knew she was holding herself out on twitter with these qualifications – and offering legal advice – seems unethical on their part not to have publicised it earlier

(5)(2)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(13)(0)

Anonymous

Also, I know this is terribly unfashionable – but spare a thought for the woman in the article, Hani Hussein, it must be pretty shit to be paraded around as a fool……….. unlike Blacker, at this stage, there is nothing to suggest that she actually advised people……tragically, the only person she has hurt is herself….

This post has been moderated because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

Anonymous

Out of all the people I could possibly ‘spare a thought’ for, I don’t think someone who faked qualifications to obtain a scholarship for a course she had no right to attend is going to be too high on my list.

Just sayin’

This post has been moderated because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

Anonymous

There are, let’s face it, only so many thoughts that one can have. Logically the reserves of those going spare is also finite.

Lily the Liberal

Spare a thought for the eight murderers and rapists that are due to be executed in Arkansas in May. This must be a very stressful time for them.

Anonymous

They can’t really do anything about her giving legal advice, unless it was in an area reserved activity. As far as the above shows, although she has clearly lied, she didn’t actually say she was a barrister, just a future pupil.

(1)(3)

Anonymous

On Instagram she said she was a barrister, and posted a letter from a ‘client’ and has said she was in court and doing prison visits.

RR

I don’t see any official sources confirming anything as of yet! Just one person who setup a twitter page saying that these allegations have been confirmed!!

(0)(2)

Anonymous

Are the institutions releasing statements not enough for you?

(6)(0)

Practising Barrister

You can see in the article that they confirmed it with Oxford Brookes. They’ve obviously waited for confirmation before printing.

This woman was one of the most prominent “barristers” on Twitter. I wonder how many people she has advised on pupillage applications. Her main “home” was Twitter – once those who discovered the fraud were sure that they were correct it was right to put it there. Naturally if it is all lies on their part they should expect a defamation suit, but her swift departure from Twitter, her removal of her “qualifications” from Instagram and the state of her degree certificate suggest that it is not.

(20)(0)

Anonymous

Hi Hani!

(1)(1)

Anonymous

RR – rubbish. Perfectly standard to be revealed if your house of cards collapses spectacularly…

(18)(0)

Anonymous

How did she afford all of those expensive degrees? There are so many more questions

(3)(4)

Anonymous

I think you’ve missed the point… which is that she never actually had those degrees and got a scholarship for the LLM!

(13)(0)

Anonymous

No, you have. She got in to all of those institutions with a falsified cert, so she must have paid them.

(0)(6)

Anonymous

The reason she didn’t graduate from Oxford Brookes was unpaid fees and she got a scholarship for the masters…

(7)(0)

Anonymous

What about CoL? Professional loan?

Anonymous

So she got a first but had financial problems?

Anonymous

No. She believes she would have got a first. She believes many things apparently.

Anonymous

This is how delusion manifests. So hypnotised by her desire to be a barrister she committed fraud to get a step closer. Only to fall on her ass.

(8)(1)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(5)(1)

Anonymous

The x-rated version of McNuggets?

(2)(1)

A pupil

Anyone who’s chambers might be prosecuting this, let us all know. Would love to go along. I’ll make signs. See yaaaa

(13)(0)

Anonymous

Red Lion may have a few interested juniors who’d be happy to help

(27)(0)

Anonymous

How did QMUL come to find out she did not have a degree? How were they alerted? What was the tip-off?

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Those on her course at Oxford were aware she did not graduate and became suspicious. But the biggest tell-tale sign was those on her cohort on the BPTC knowing she did not pass, but seeing her online saying she a) had been called and b) advising clients.

Didn’t take long for it to catch up with her. She may have gotten away with it had it not been for her need to boast.

(19)(0)

Comments are closed.