Reshuffle: Ex-City lawyer who claimed foodbank users have ‘cash flow problems’ returns to the MoJ

Dominic Raab MP made a Justice Minister, as fellow commercial solicitor made Work and Pensions Secretary

A former City lawyer who claimed many foodbank users are not “languishing in poverty” but merely have “cash flow problems” is the Ministry of Justice’s (MoJ) new Minister of State.

Dominic Raab, a Conservative MP for Esher and Walton since 2010, returns to the MoJ having spent a year as its Minister for Human Rights in 2015. Raab replaces former Fenners Chambers barrister Sir Oliver Heald QC as Minister of State, and will work directly under the new Justice Secretary David Lidington.

Raab, who studied law at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, hit headlines last month when he appeared on Victoria Derbyshire’s BBC election debate programme. Referencing data produced by the Trussell Trust — a charity that operates over 400 foodbanks across the United Kingdom — Raab said:

What they [Trussell Trust] tend to find is the typical user of a foodbank is not someone that’s languishing in poverty, it’s someone who has a cash flow problem episodically.

His comments were widely criticised. Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron, for example, called them “stupid and deeply offensive”.

Having completed his masters at Jesus College, Cambridge, Raab went on to become a lawyer at magic circle outfit Linklaters, specialising in project finance, international litigation and competition law. Keen to make the move into politics, he ditched his legal career and joined the Foreign Office in 2000.

So how are lawyers feeling about Raab’s latest move? We think these tweets speak for themselves:

Raab isn’t the only lawyer to land a new role as part of Theresa May’s ministerial reshuffle. David Gauke, MP for South West Hertfordshire and now Work and Pensions Secretary, spent six years in the financial services group at City outfit Macfarlanes.

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18 Comments

Anonymous

Looks like the private school > Oxbridge > City law firm > politics > high paid freelance consultancy train > golden retirement is still running regular trips through British society.

(19)(3)
Anonymous

He was quoting the Trussel Trust. As I understood it that Is the view of food bank providers. I don’t think he, or anyone else, was suggesting closing them. Cash flow problems can be a very serious issue. Is it outrageous to say the truth in leftie land?

(20)(9)
Corbyn. Sympathiser

Why do you think people in Tory Britain, on zero hours contracts with dwindling wages just as inflation is up to its highest level in four years, might have ‘cashflow problems’?

(10)(8)
Corbyn will fix it

It couldn’t possibly because of all their Tory-voting parent’s borrowing. Yet, to look after their own kids, those parents will happily screw over the kids of others by offering them poor wages with zero hours contracts. It is a dog eat dog world and the Tories are pitting everybody off against each other in the rat race. We need somebody like Corbyn to step in and provide a solution for the many and not the few.

(7)(10)
See

I can’t tell if they is a joke or serious.

The state of our country really does depress me some times.

(3)(1)
Corbyn. Sympathiser

This does not answer my question, nor is it an insightful comment.

(1)(0)
Simon B

From the Trussell Trust website:

“Trussell Trust data also reveals that benefit delays and changes remain the biggest cause of referral to a foodbank, accounting for 43 percent of all referrals (26 percent benefit delay; 17 percent benefit change), a slight rise on last year’s 42 percent. Low income has also risen as a referral cause from 23 percent to 26 percent.”

(7)(1)
Simon B

Raab’s comment:

“What they [Trussell Trust] tend to find is the typical user of a foodbank is not someone that’s languishing in poverty, it’s someone who has a cash flow problem episodically.”

Remarkably dissimilar to the Trussell Trust comment.

(7)(3)
Smart and liberal fella

What a nasty specimen. I would love to verbally shred him at a dinner party table.

(6)(6)
Anonymous

A careerist, pure and simple. He wrote a book lambasting the Labour government for its “Assault on Liberty” and then spent nearly ten years arguing in favour of legal aid cuts, the scrapping of the HRA and, now, even tougher terror laws than the ones he was criticising Labour for. He can piss right off.

(8)(0)
Corbyn. Sympathiser

I don’t think it’s a coincidence that his name is an anagram for what many north of the border say about him: “rancid, ma boi”.

(2)(0)
Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(1)

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