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University of Law strikes training deal with RPC

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International outfit finds new law school to develop its future legal talent

The University of Law (ULaw) has sealed a deal with RPC that will see it become the exclusive legal education provider for the firm’s future trainees.

The international outfit — best known for its high-end insurance work — will now send its new recruits to ULaw’s Moorgate campus to complete both their Legal Practice Course (LPC) and, if necessary, their Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL).

Until recently, the firm sent its 15 or so trainees a year to BPP Law School. Commenting on today’s move, RPC’s partner and training principle, Simon Hart, said:

We are very enthusiastic about the prospects for our new partnership with ULaw. As RPC continues to respond to the rapidly changing legal market, as well as the forthcoming radical reforms to legal education, we were looking for a partner in the education sector who reflected our own desire to be progressive and forward thinking. With ULaw, we believe we have found that partner.

Moreover, ULaw has also revealed it is in the process of creating a brand new insurance module for the firm’s newbie lawyers, following the introduction of the Insurance Act 2015. The legislation — which came into force last year — is said to be the biggest overhaul of insurance rules and regulations in the past 100 years.

Professor Andrea Nollent, CEO and vice-chancellor at ULaw added:

We are confident that our existing legal education programmes combined with the development of a new insurance law elective will play a pivotal part in training the future workforce of RPC and provide them with the skills needed to succeed in a highly competitive market.

Legal Cheek’s Most List shows that RPC trainees start on a salary of £37,000, rising to £40,000 in year two. The first batch of new recruits will start at ULaw this September.

ULaw already has tie-ups with the likes of Linklaters, DLA Piper, CMS, Ashurst and Berwin Leighton Paisner. Meanwhile BPP has similar deals with Clifford Chance, Holman Fenwick Willan and Mayer Brown.

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24 Comments

Anonymous

Sounds like a great arrangement for both parties. Insurance is at the heart of what RPC do and I am sure this will lay the strong foundations for many a great careers for the youngsters joining the firm.

(8)(3)

Anonymous

Is insurance work profitable?

(2)(1)

Anonymous

Insurance clients are big financial institutions that can afford all their legal costs, and hate paying out on policies so engage lawyers to fight as many claims as possible. Yes, it’s profitable.

(6)(1)

Anonymous

Not the most profitable compared to some other work in the city, but it is interesting, good quality work for clients that will keep coming back with a steady stream of work. It seems that RPC are happy to do good work for good clients, for it to be a pleasant place for the lawyers who work there with steady career prospects and reasonable hours, and without the desire to try and drive PEP up to 7 figures or grow too fast.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

It’s high volume stuff isn’t it? Not as high margin as PE, Lev Fin etc

(0)(1)

Anonymous

Higher value claims work (£80-100m+) can go on for years and be big earners for firms like RPC who specialise in insurance. The smaller value stuff will inevitably be settled quickly as costs become an issue (why pay millions in legal fees fighting something worth under £10m), but there is value to insurers throwing a bit of money at these to settle for a more reasonable sum – those will top up the money that come in on bigger claims. Coverage advices also provide a steady income stream. Generally the bigger, higher value and more complex stuff will be done by London teams, and the higher volume, lower value work will be done by Bristol.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

You forget that insurance disputes or coverage advice is not the only lucrative part of having a insurance client. My last firm has been retained for decades by a top 50 insurance company, and they generate nearly £1 million a year worth of work (and we were probably one of the smallest/least instructed firms on their panel). Most of that was due to being instructed for property purchases and other investments. Again, these are big financial institutions that, like pensions, use policy holder premiums as capital for investments. That way if they do have to pay out on big settlements they can use the interest they made on their investments to pad their bonuses. So yes, the corporate/finance work can be both high volume and high value due to their available capital.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

I wonder how much they charge the retained law firms per trainee head versus how much they charge the individual students who are required to self fund. ULaw and BPP are cookie cutter institutions providing what should be a mostly standardised course, so the only competitive advantage to the firms switching between the two all the time has to be cost.

(2)(0)

Time NicebutDim

Not sure I agree – Do you not think its a bit crap that as law students we all emerge with pretty much a similar qualification? I understand that the undergrad is the real proving ground, so it is probably not fair to compare our system to the Americans to any great extent. However, ‘getting a GDL/LPC from Ulaw/BPP’ doesn’t quite have the same ring to going to law school at Havard/Columbia/etc…

(2)(4)

Anonymous

Might not have the same ring to it, but then it also don’t cost ~$180-250k in tuition fees fam.

(4)(0)

Donald Trump Jnr

Additionally, with attending Harvard/Columbia, the real turd biter is being in the US.
There is some truth in the joke…
“Why was Jesus not born in the US??… Because God had difficulty finding 3 wise men and a virgin…”

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Typically about 60-75% of what they charge an individual.

Depends on the size of the trainee cohort and how long the agreement is for though.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Also Ulaw/BPP “add value” by tailoring the LPC to the firm.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Claim to add value….

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Is this article part of the deal that LC offered RPC to obtain the meagre amount of funds supplied to Alex’s back pocket? Otherwise I can’t think who would care where some mid-ranking non descript firm chooses to send its future trainees.

(2)(3)

Anonymous

There is a reason Alex trousers his £80k per year (Alex – please confirm this and the salaries of all other Legal Cheek staff).

I disagree about your RPC comments. RPC are pretty big in the insurance world and for that reason I take interest.

(1)(3)

Anonymous

Thanks RPC marketing team!

(0)(0)

Anonymous

I am an insurance lawyer, not a member of the RPC marketing team.

(1)(2)

Anonymous

Sure you are 😉

(0)(2)

Anonymous

I actually am.

(2)(1)

Anonymous

Yup. Definitely. 😉

(1)(2)

Anonymous

RPC are a great from but surprised they are using ULaw. ULaw don’t have good Insurance Law designers, infact their new LPC model is dull as ditch water. We don’t use ULaw in my law firm (Magic Circle) because their new LPC became paper based and all the great multi media went.

(2)(2)

Anonymous

Insurance work at RPC is necessary work done at a good firm. But you have to laugh at sols:

“Mum, I know what I want to be when I grow up – a lawyer.”

“I’m so proud! You’ll be like you’re in Silk, or maybe in that film Denial, ooh that was class.”

“No Mum, I want to write nit-picking letters to companies who try to claim on insurance policies because they say their new warehouse’s foundations are 2 inches too shallow or their shipment of concentrated orange juice arrived a week late.”

“Oh.”

(2)(3)

Anonymous

Yawn.

(0)(0)

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