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Law Society president steps down amid misconduct claims

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David Greene, who denies claim he misled judge, will leave role later this month

David Greene

The president of the Law Society will step down later this month after the High Court ruled that he should appear before a disciplinary tribunal over allegations he deliberately misled a judge. David Greene denies the claim and says he fully expects to be cleared.

In a statement this morning, Greene said: “In the past few weeks, a long-running issue to do with a dispute with a former client has been sent back to the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT) in a lay complaint following a decision in the High Court which is itself subject to appeal. This case dates back a decade and has been repeatedly thrown out and I fully expect it to be rejected again.”

Greene continued: “However, the fact that this dispute has been referred back to the SDT during my presidential year will, I fear, become a distraction from my role representing the solicitor profession — at a time when it is facing a period of unprecedented challenge.”

Greene went on to confirm he will step down on 19 March rather than at the end of his term in October. He will be replaced by the current vice president, I. Stephanie Boyce.

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Legal Cheek reported earlier this year that Edwin Coe partner Greene stood accused of deliberately misleading a judge during a 2008 dispute with businessman David Davies over an unpaid bill. The High Court recently ruled Greene has a case to answer.

Greene added: “I’ve been involved in the Law Society for more than a decade in a number of different guises including chairing policy committees and the policy board. I look forward to further service to my profession in the coming years.”

“I wish my successor as president, I. Stephanie Boyce, who will fill the vacancy created and the rest of the organisation well for the future. It has been a deep privilege to represent my profession as an office holder over the past two and a half years.”

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