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The GDL is for ‘spineless’ losers, says Bristol Uni law student

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Graduate Diploma in Law is for those with a half-hearted interest in legal profession, claims LLBer, amid decline in popularity of conversion route

loser

A Bristol University law student has lambasted the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) course as a waste of time and the refuge of those lacking in the capacity for original thought.

The first-year LLB student — whose name has been anonymised — recently launched a fiery broadside against the law conversion course — on which around 4,000 students enrol annually — which appeared on The Tab website.

According to the article, the law student’s cousin — who is set to start a GDL course later this year at an unnamed institution — triggered her thoughts. And that relation might now be wishing that she had kept her rather demoralising opinions to herself, rather than broadcasting them on a renowned student website.

The gist of the argument is that only students that are not true to their hearts will sign up for the GDL. In other words, they don’t have the gumption and courage to stick with a first-degree subject they enjoy and pursue a career in that field.

In the law student’s world, there are only two reasons students opt for the GDL — and neither of them is commendable.

Reason one: you’re putting off going into the big, bad world and forgot that a masters would probably be more enjoyable.

The second reason?

You made an unspoken pact with your parents you’d do it if they’d let you study a fun arts degree first.

Indeed reason two attracts significant vitriol from the writer, who is is identified only as the secretary to Bristol University’s journalism society.

If that sounds like you,” she writes, “you are completely spineless. Live your life for yourself, not your parents; you’re over 20 and should be able to make your own decisions.

Whether you agree with her not, the anti-GDL sentiment chimes with recent stats that show student interest in the course bombing since the financial crisis. According to statistics from the Central Applications Board, the body administering the online applications system for the GDL in England and Wales, there were 5,980 applications made to do a law conversion course in 2008-09, but by last year that figure had plunged to just 3,690.

GDL-apps

Most of the law student’s short diatribe is not in fact directed at the GDL itself, but at the force behind its decline in popularity: the narrowing prospects of comfortable employment in the modern legal profession.

She rehashes figures highlighting the disparity between the number of law degree and GDL graduates, Legal Practice Course students and law firm training contracts and bar pupillages.

The law student is a little bit wobbly on the distinction between being admitted to the roll of solicitors and actually being able to practise. And she also cites an average starting salary for law graduates of less than £20,000, without pointing out that trainees in the City earn more than double that wage.

But, hey, she’s a first-year student, so perhaps she’ll be cut some slack on the detail of her argument.

The main point ultimately is this message to anyone considering the GDL:

Do yourself a favour and find something more original to do. The world’s got enough lawyers already.

104 Comments

Cantab law grad

The GDL students have the last laugh – do a History degree, get a first, do the GDL, get a pupillage.

(126)(8)

Anonymous

Well said. And the proliferation of law students means that it is jolly hard to do so well in compared with other subjects.

(11)(7)

Anonymous

Yep. And frankly most pupillage committees prefer a person with a first in Greats and the GDL to a person with a first in law from Bristol – even though Classics at Oxford is easier to get into than law at Bristol (in terms of applicants to place), and a lower proportion of law students get firsts. I say this as a GDL-er with pupillage.

(26)(8)

Pantman

I must be thick, or it’s just the time of day or something – what is “a first in Greats”!?

Whatever it is, it seems that chambers actually prefer law graduates to those with GDLs:

http://www.indx.co.uk/pupilbase/?mode=stats&rtype=bptcgdl#bptcgdl-gdl

(13)(7)

Anonymous

exactly

(3)(1)

Anonymous

Greats = Classics.

(5)(1)

Anonymous

Should have gone to Oxford….

(6)(1)

Anonymous

No, your statistic shows that there are slightly more juniors with law degrees than with the GDL. But that would only show that chambers prefer applicants with law degrees if we knew that law and non-law people applied in equal proportion. If you look at the tenants 10 years’ call and below for the top 25 chambers, there are a hell of a lot more Oxbridge Classics people than Bristol/UCL/KCL law people. Maybe that’s because there are more Oxbridge people applying – but I doubt that some bias does not also come into play.

(6)(1)

MC trainee

Everyone knows that getting a first in law is many times harder than to get a first in history or English. So it does make sense, as, as far as I know, law firms don’t discriminate too much between traditional degree subjects, to get that high 2:1 or first in English then go on to apply for TCs.

It’s a shame, because a law degree can be a really interesting pursuit. Outside options such as PIL, commercial law and company law, IT law, etc can be really useful as well as interesting.

However, due to the difficulty of getting a TC nowadays, it makes sense to go for a degree where it is easier to get higher module grades. The biggest downside is the cost of doing the GDL if you don’t secure a TC during uni.

(15)(15)

Anonymous

well said as a Law lecturer you are quite right you will have a fair higher chance of a first/ high 2:1 in a soft subject rather than law of my cohort this year we awarded on three Firsts and those students were outstanding…

(8)(14)

Anonymous

*Far iphone…

(3)(0)

Anonymous

Law is a soft subject

(28)(24)

Anonymous

No, MC trainee, everyone doesn’t know that. Because it’s complete and utter bollocks. As is the rest of your ‘analysis’ of the benefits of studying something other than law.

The reason that firms don’t much care if you have an LLB or a GDL is because a good degree in a core subject from a good university is some assurance of an intelligent and educated person, the sort that a law firm wants to train in law and procedure that they won’t have been taught at any previous academic level. Humanities graduates are probably a lot safer to put in front of clients early on as well: they might actually have some social skills and self-awareness already.

For what it’s worth I entered the law via an LLB.

(13)(2)

MC Trainee

I’m not sure what you appear to be angry about. It is a fact that far fewer firsts in law are given out than in other subjects. This is true at Cambridge, Oxford, LSE, UCL and Durham.

Compare maths and law at Cam – Between 2000 and 2014 an average of 17 per cent of law students scored a first, compared with an average of 32 per cent of mathematics students.

Economics – 29% get firsts.

History – 31% get firsts.

English – 29%.

Law…? 17-18%I’m not sure what you appear to be angry about. It is a fact that far fewer firsts in law are given out than in other subjects. This is true at Cambridge, Oxford, LSE, UCL and Durham.

Compare maths and law at Cam – Between 2000 and 2014 an average of 17 per cent of law students scored a first, compared with an average of 32 per cent of mathematics students.

Economics – 29% get firsts at Cam.
History – 31% get firsts.
English – 28%.

Clearly a much lower percentage of law students get firsts and unless you assume that the average law student is less intelligent that the average history, English or economics student, the stats at all unis show that it is harder to get a first in law than to get a first in other subjects.

I don’t see what is so objectionable about the other things I said either. Those subjects have been useful to me as a trainee, to varying degrees. That’s my opinion, but one that has developed through practice.

(1)(3)

MC Trainee

I’m not sure what you appear to be angry about. It is a fact that far fewer firsts in law are given out than in other subjects. This is true at Cambridge, Oxford, LSE, UCL and Durham.

Compare maths and law at Cam – Between 2000 and 2014 an average of 17 per cent of law students scored a first, compared with an average of 32 per cent of mathematics students.

Economics – 29% get firsts.

History – 31% get firsts.

English – 29%.

Law…? 17-18%I’m not sure what you appear to be angry about. It is a fact that far fewer firsts in law are given out than in other subjects. This is true at Cambridge, Oxford, LSE, UCL and Durham.

Compare maths and law at Cam – Between 2000 and 2014 an average of 17 per cent of law students scored a first, compared with an average of 32 per cent of mathematics students.

Economics – 29% get firsts.

History – 31% get firsts.

English – 28%.

Clearly a much lower percentage of law students get first and unless you assume that the average law student is less intelligent that the average history, English or economics student, the stats at all unis show that it is harder to get a first in law than to get a first in other subjects.

I don’t see what is so objectionable about the other things I said either. Those subjects have been useful to me as a trainee, to varying degrees. That’s my opinion, but one that has developed through practice.

(1)(5)

FOARP

Those percentages are pretty unbelievable and confirm pretty much everything I and my fellow physics/astrophysics students felt about arts/humanities students when I was in university (i.e., they have it far too damned easy). Out of the ~50 people who started my course only ~25 finished, and of those only one received a first. What on Earth is the meaning of a first if 1-in-3 receive one?

(1)(3)

Anonymous

I have both a History degree and a Law degree. I studied at the Russell group university for both of them.

Take it from me – getting a first in my law degree was in no way more difficult than the history degree. You’re kidding yourself if you truly believe that a law degree is significantly more taxing.

I’m sorry it’s an awkward truth, but it is still nonetheless true.

(23)(4)

Anonymous

Really? I found my GDL way harder than my (Cambridge) History degree! And my GDL marks were lower than any of my degree marks (though not shockingly bad or anything). I think law is harder at least in that it involves a lot more memorisation. Obviously it also depends on what you’re naturally good at. But it is true that law seems to give out fewer firsts.

(9)(7)

Anonymous

A first year law student bored during the summer decides to attack a course that provides a similar qualification to her own in a shorter time frame? Stop the presses this is a fresh story!

Much like many other first-year students Mowll’s is puffed up by an undeserved ego after having spent a year away from home and being ‘independent’ for the first time in her life. It’s common sport amongst undergrads to pick at other degrees for whatever reason. Someone just gave her a platform to do this on a national level.

(89)(3)

Anonymous

Poor writer pens article full of bitterness and drivel. Stop the presses!

(39)(4)

Boh Dear

By quicker you mean taking four years (and the obvious extra fees) vs three years for an LLB?…

(11)(1)

Anonymous

I meant the actual year itself as opposed to a 3 year undergrad, that appears to be something so many LLBers take issue with

(4)(0)

Anonymous

What a load of rubbish. I always knew I would end up at the bar, and wish I had taken the opportunity to do something else at University whilst I had the chance. Probably would have done better too!

(21)(3)

A. Barrister

I had the same feelings, and so I did PPE followed by a GDL. This way I can chat-shit in 4 subjects. I paid top-up fees (though being from a poor background I also got some grants) and the GDL via a loan – it was worth it nevertheless.

(29)(2)

Ap

Immature and just plain wrong. A law degree won’t make you a decent solicitor (a bit of extra law might help those wanting to become barristers). Common sense will though, and she appears to be seriously lacking in that department. In a few years she will look back at that article and cringe.

(64)(2)

Dan Longman

How narrow-minded this young girl appears to be. Considering she has no real experience of her own degree yet, or dare I presume, of grown-up life, her arrogance is staggering.

(47)(4)

Tordenskjold

I might have to come back in 3 years and see how she is getting on securing a TC. With her way with words she may be at JAFLAS soon enough.

(23)(0)

Steve Williams

Perhaps we should all bow down to Ms.Mowlls obvious wealth of knowledge and experience. Or perhaps remind her that some of us have actually been out there and experienced other facets of life – like manual labour and a wider breadth of education.

(28)(0)

Shirley

I’ve got a llb and I’ve been out there. She is 100% correct. Utter pisstake.

(2)(19)

Kuzka's Mother

Wow, I really wish someone had told me this before I’d done my undergrad, GDL, LPC, training contract and now 2 years qualified. I’d never have gone down this path! Thank you for enlightening us!

(32)(1)

Anonymous

I might just quit my training contract now and go back to do the LLB before reapplying.

(33)(0)

Bemused

People always seem to say do a degree you enjoy first then do law as if the only reason people did law was for the careers and never anything else. Does no one actually consider, when they are telling these people not to do undergrad law but to to history and a GDL instead, that some people actually *like* studying law?

(23)(3)

Trufax Fairfax

I’m amazed how many people are biting – just ignore the drivel comments.

(1)(1)

Anonymous

I think the key lesson here is that it’s a really bad idea to make sweeping judgments about a matter of which you are so clearly completely ignorant.

(26)(0)

Russel Brand

It works for me.

(19)(1)

Katie Hopkins

Joke’s on you, I’ve made a career out of it.

(19)(0)

Russell Brand

I do indeedeth do jokes AND made a career out of it. Somehow.

(13)(1)

Katie Hopkins

Shall we mate?

(7)(3)

Russell Brand

I thinketh not, you saucy mare. I’m a lothario not a lunatic.

(10)(1)

A. Nonny-Mouse

LLB tears still salty?

(7)(1)

Anonymous

How does she know a law degree is “harder” than any other subject? She has barely studied the law at this point, as a 1st year LLB. When she starts applying for TCs, HR are going to have fun googling her name and finding this little gem.

(22)(0)

Anonymous

It won’t be HR but it will be the partners interviewing her who will do this.

(9)(0)

VTESI

This is why I feel SO sorry for this idiotic girl…. I mean her comments were idiotic, posting them online even more stupid, worst still she’ll pay for it in the future. But perhaps getting an online putdown will make her a better person in the future…

(10)(0)

Anonymous

Very few people take the LLB or GDL without a very clear idea of where they are going. The competition is immense and therefore it’s not something you can wing. Her article reeks of someone who feels doing a law degree is enough to give her some sort of prestige regardless of the fact she’s only a first year. A degree isn’t enough these days to secure a TC and I suggest she’s just scared of the competition.

(14)(1)

Anonymous

Further to my comment,
http://thetab.com/uk/bristol/2015/07/13/youve-decided-soul-crushing-law-conversion/

Disgraceful. First result when googling her name. Good luck in the future Ms LLB

(12)(1)

Judge Fudge

She’s the Katie Hopkins of “legal journalism”

(13)(0)

Anonymous

And reason no. 3: career-changing, mature student with family and full time job. Snap!

(19)(0)

Mr Whemmick

So a first year law student has a pop at folks who don’t choose the correct first degree….?

Despite her being a wannabe journo…!

And this wonderful article will indeed be the first thing that any prospective employer reads about the lass in the future.

I really don’t think Ms Mowll is actually that bright.

(16)(0)

Anonymous

Feel very sorry for her if she has interviews in the future with firms or chambers and the people sat opposite her studied non-law subjects. This will come back to haunt her.

(17)(1)

ey you what?

This post has been removed because it breaches Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(2)(2)

Anonymous

I’m a barrister. I studied law at Oxford and really enjoyed it. However, I wish I’d studied Geography (or similar). I’d have achieved a better grade and had more free time. I could also have done the senior status law degree to milk an extra two years as a student.

(10)(2)

Anonymous

I wonder how many of her coursemates will agree with her views, not many I feel. I always felt my fellow law students to be quite a mixed and “well-rounded” bunch. The remainder of her LLB could be unpleasant due to this.

Really this is a demonstration of the danger airing views online via any platform.

Good job these comments are anonymous.

(7)(0)

VTESI

True – although I always have a policy of assuming that everything I write could be read without disdain by someone who knows me. Best way to go, I’d say.

(1)(1)

Tuggo

This post has been removed because it breaches Legal Cheek’s comment policy.

(1)(1)

Rufus

I did a law degree. I hated it. I wish I’d done classics or philosophy. It very nearly prevented me from going to the Bar (where I am now a perfectly happy lawyer).

(7)(0)

Sabrina

I think this poor girl needs to realise that a career in practice is absolutely not equated with the contents on an undergrad law degree. Law is a fantastic subject to study at undergrad, as are many other subjects. Anyway, you’ll spend the first few months in practice running around like a headless chicken regardless of what undergrad you choose to study.

I do wish that the editor of this student newspaper had the sense to restrain her from making such a fool out of herself.

(15)(0)

Anonymous

It is the Tab though – they will be really happy it is getting this amount of discussion on another website. Its ability to fire people up (one way or another) is probably the only reason they published it, because lets face it, the article is pretty poor otherwise.

(9)(0)

Not Amused

Firstly I should say that this is not criticism of the majority.

But there is a thick vein of something distasteful running through these comments and I wouldn’t be the universal pain in the arse that I am if I failed to point that out. Threatening the girl is not on.

Education is about learning. Learning is about taking a position and arguing it. Ideally you would argue as best you can. Ideally the counter arguments are the best they can be. Ideally this argument is in detail. Now I would like to live in a country, indeed a world, where this process went on all the time 24/7. But facing reality, the least I can legitimately expect is that this process can freely occur while my nation’s youth are at university: like this kid.

She’s taken a position. I suspect it is more nuanced than some of you give her credit for. At the very least we must accept that lots of GDL-ers ‘fall in’ to the GDL because they didn’t have a plan. But I suspect the counter argument is that picking a law degree aged 17 is more luck than a genuine scheme. Regardless, the argument has merit, needs nuance and she should be free to discuss it.

I suspect a lot of the overreaction is the result of insecurity. Quite why GDL kids (and ex-kids) remain so bloody insecure about the GDL is a mystery to me – Sumption did it and so did many other (competent) law lords. But regardless of your insecurity or hurt feelings – it is just not acceptable to threaten a relatively young kid whose only crime is engaging in thought.

No pupillage panel or TC panel would ever discriminate against this girl. She’s thinking. We like thinking. She may be wrong – hey ho. Lots of CoA judges are wrong when the Supremes over turn them. Lots of Supremes are wrong when they think they’re right. What matters is not being right or wrong – it’s the freedom to think, speak and debate.

By all means engage with this girl. But how dare any of you seek to threaten or scare her by making spurious, wrong and cheap references to her future job prospects? Oh I know you can counter this and say, well NA aren’t you just a hypocrite? There are three answers to this:
1) yes, probably;
2) I’m usually rude to people I disagree with rather than threatening;
3) I’m generally rude to David Neuberger, John Thomas, Rupert Jackson et al and I think we can all assume they’ve got pretty broad shoulders.

So stop threatening a kid. Stop seeking to stifle debate. It’s ugly and unacceptable.

(29)(17)

Anonymous

Who’s stifling debate? We’re just commenting on what a plank she’ll look like when it comes to future TC applications. She exercises her right to free speech to be a nasty little person to GDL people, we exercise our right to point out what a complete fool she is.

(13)(5)

Anonymous

Good god you’re a bore. GDL and ex-GDL students aren’t being insecure about their qualification, they’re annoyed that someone with so little insight is insulting them and their hard work. How can you not understand that Not Amused? Why do you never use logic in your thought process?

(14)(4)

A. Nonny-Mouse

You’re asking a lot there.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

I can’t see anyone threatening her nor stifling the debate.

She opened herself up to scrutiny when she decided to write an article published in a student newspaper that is the equivalent of the Daily Star. If the article came from a more informed point of view and wasn’t so obnoxious, then we wouldn’t even be having this discussion. But the article was written by a sensationalist (and probably naive) author for a sensationalist media company. Unfortunately that means little common sense was applied in its creation or publication, which is why she may find some people question her at later stages in her potential career. It is not that she wrote the article or argued a point, it’s the fact she did so in such a terrible way.

(8)(0)

Not Amused

Comments about her future employability are cruel. They’re also designed to be cruel, the author invariably wishes to hurt and upset her. The fact that such comments are themselves both sensationalist and wrong has apparently not been considered.

(6)(8)

Anonymous

That’s not cruelty it’s honesty. There’s more awareness than ever that our digital footprint can impact on our job prospects. For a Millenial to not recognise that shows a lack of foresight that is probably not desirable in any legal professional.

Are the comments particularly wrong? If you saw someone disparaging the importance of one of your qualifications which you had worked exceptionally hard for and paid through the nose would you want to hire them knowing that they sneer at people like you?

(11)(1)

Anonymous

cruel or otherwise. its true.

she will have to harvest a heap of goodwill after this dungheap she has just chucked onto her CV.

She may get into a novelty firm that thinks any publicity is good publicity.

(5)(0)

Anonymous

It isn’t about being cruel, it is about being honest. Trying to tell her everything will be OK is even more cruel if it is a pack of lies.

At least if she is reading this she can get a wake up call and find some ways to do some damage limitation.

(5)(0)

Anonymous

Disagreeing with someone =/= threatening.

Good god you’ve had a serious logic malfunction here.

(2)(1)

Anonymous

Doubtful whether there was any logic with which to malfunction in the first place.

(1)(0)

Bonjy

Poor lass. I’d recommend requesting the right to be forgotten when tc applications come round.

(9)(1)

Wolowizard

I agree with anonymous on this one. This is going to come back and haunt the author, in more ways than one. From reading her contribution to the student rag, it seems like a bit of self protectionism.

Word of advice, you spout off like this to a client or at Court, you’ll be in for a rather pleasant surprise in the way of the regulator. BTW – I represent registrants at professional disciplinary tribunals (mainly health) so when you do get your letter, give me a call.

(7)(2)

Sian

I would like to reiterate what a load of rubbish this article is. I am a GDL student who has wanted a career at the Bar since I was 11, I am willing to bet, that’s a lot longer than the LLB author of this piece. I chose to do my degree in History and Politics because I have a genuine academic interest in the subjects and wanted to pursue some originality and individuality in my studies. I am not usually the type to comment on this kind of site but, I am sick and tired of law students rubbishing other degrees and vice versa. The GDL was tough, I am the first to admit that, but that is not to say that my first degree wasn’t. Every course has it’s challenges, that is not unique to law students, much as they like to think it is. Whether studying Law at degree level, or as a GDL, it is a matter of personal choice, and to assign people to boxes based on this choice makes you a very narrow minded individual, that begs the question- are you even the right sort of person to be a lawyer? Rant over.

(12)(1)

Legal Beak

“A career at the bar since I was 11”

Christ, I wanted to be Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle. The only bar I knew was the one my dad went to 6 times a week.

(39)(0)

Anonymous

One for Comments of the Week.

(0)(0)

VTESI

Hey I’ve wanted to be a barrister since I was 8 – I win.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

I was so sad when Donatello died

(1)(0)

Anonymous

I was so sad when Donatello died

(0)(0)

Michelangelo

For the record, I am still a party dude.

(5)(0)

anonymiss

I wanted to be a solicitor from age 6. I blame Ally McBeal for everything.

(3)(0)

Harrison Ford

You gotta point there.

(0)(0)

Wolowizard

And I forgot to mention – I know a very competent and well grounded judge who did the GDL. They are doing rather well for themselves and have never looked back.

(5)(1)

MrShineHimDiamond

Thank god you remembered to mention it

(6)(1)

Anonymous

No problems. Thanks for mentioning that it was good that I mentioned it

(4)(0)

Anonymous

Idiotic comments. She should listen to Sumption’s views on the merits of doing a law degree. But what do I know? I’m only a modern languages graduate who practises at the Bar …

(4)(0)

Anonymous

STOP PRESS

First year uni student professes to know everything about anything.

Also, did you know that you can now buy sliced bread?

(17)(0)

A. Nonny-Mouse

Speechless. I’ve been making my own all this time.

(5)(0)

Anonymous

This is incredibly narrow-minded… As an American living in London for the past four years, I never had a choice to do law as a first degree, and it made more sense both financially and personally to do the GDL in the UK. Sure, there’s the option of a Senior Status LLB, but I’m not getting any younger!

A considerable amount of people on the GDL are from similar backgrounds, or just simply chose a career switch later in life. Additionally, in light of the recession and the falling rates of people joining the GDL, one could argue that the people who are still taking the GDL are those people who are very much committed to a legal career, despite the decline in available pupillages, etc.

This person’s views are a clear sign of her age, immaturity and limited experience in “the real world”/outside university.

(6)(3)

Mr Warburton

Cheers for the plug!

(10)(0)

Anonymous

Annoying Law Student Demographic #1: LLB students who lambaste GDL students for lack of commitment to the subject. Annoying Law Student Demographic #2: GDL students who react as if someone had used a derogatory term towards their mother. Solicitor Pro-Tip: Once you get into practice, nobody gives a shit

(20)(0)

Lethargic Bystander

Kids say stupid things. Nothing to see here – move along.

(5)(0)

Mr Whemmick

Has Not Amused got so much time to waffle away on here in that pompous way of his because:

1. He ain’t got any fee-paying work to do; or

2. He’s just a crashing bore?

(2)(1)

Not Amused

I vote 2 with a little dash of ‘terms over’.

Are you here because rof is dying?

(7)(0)

Anonymous

Rof is always dying.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

It died years ago.

It is only running where it manages to get money out of their friends who just happen to be senior partners in return for “advertising”. Most marketing/HR teams have been trying to drop it for years.

(1)(0)

Mr Whemmick

Term always seems over for you…

(0)(0)

Anon

I almost choked on my coffee when I read NA’s comments and found I agreed with them for once. Well said.

I also marvel at those current pupils who know what the assorted members of their pupillage committee are thinking! I wish I had had such a degree of insight when I was a pupil…

(8)(0)

Anonymous

Reminds me of the teaching degree students who look down on the PGCE types with a degree in a different discipline – “they lack my dedication to teaching, blah blah, etc”

(5)(1)

Elvis Presley QC

Sophie Mowll is simply a dumb blonde! I have completed the GDL and would not hire her. She will become a failure and end up on Legal Cheek writing bitter comments about people succeeding in the legal field under the names of Not Amused, Bemused and so on.

(7)(6)

Not Unamused

NA probably fancies her…

(2)(2)

Jade

Mowll’s opinion simply shows her as very stupid. Most GDL student’s I’ve met found it not only financially wasteful but of no sense to start over another 3 or 4 years undergraduate course again in order to become a lawyer when they can do it less than half the time.
These are people that have already conquered their first degree and courageously move on to another level of study. A sensible person would rather have some respect and regard to these people instead of writing this abhorrent nonsense -especially as you are even yet to fully understand what a first degree entails not to mention passing out and graduating!

(4)(1)

Anonymous

Come on, she’s just a silly child.

(6)(0)

Anonymous

She’s right. I did a non-law degree and got a 1st with little work. I then did a law degree and got a 2.1. She isn’t saying that the LLB is a smarter route than the GDL if you want a legal job. She’s saying it’s a cop-out – and it is.

(4)(7)

Anonymous

You are just as dumb. The GDL is not cop-out. The best lawyers are those with experience in other areas. These comments lack maturity. Who does TWO first degrees? Get a job and stop wasting mummy and daddy’s money on endless degrees.

(8)(1)

Anonymous

I think the point is really that the ‘best lawyers’ are not determined by whether you do the GDL or LLB, in general.

(0)(1)

Me name

“Most law is only common sense with knobs on.” – Jonathan Sumption.

Law is not very hard and stop with all that “mine is better than yours” nonsense. If some of you are really barristers, getting into these childish arguments speaks a lot about your insecurity. Also, the quality of “comebacks” demonstrates very poor debating skills.

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