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Number of students studying undergraduate law degrees has risen by 28% since 2007

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LLBs are booming — and increasingly dominated by women

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The number of people taking up places to study law at higher education institutions has increased sharply over the last few years.

Figures from the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) show the amount of successful applicants to undergraduate law courses to have risen by 5,215 (28%) since 2007, and 600 (3%) since last year.

This means that there are over 5,000 more students enrolling on undergraduate law courses in 2015 than did so in 2007.

The new figures correspond with a 38% drop in applications for the postgraduate law conversion course, known as the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL). In 2008-09 there were 5,980 made for the GDL, but just 3,690 in 2014-15.

Interestingly, it’s women who are leading the way in the growth of law at undergraduate level. The difference in the number of men taking up law degrees compared to women reached its deepest divide in 2015.

Of the 23,825 students that accepted offers to study law last year, just over a third (34%) were male.

The UCAS stats reveal that the gender divide between law degree placeholders has steadily increased throughout the years, culminating in the biggest split ever in 2015.

In 2007, the successful applicants were 38% men and 62% women. Last year, 35% of accepted students were men and 65% women. Last year saw an even more polarised result, with the number of male freshers dipping below 35% for the first time.

The influx of female law students is part of an ongoing trend of women flourishing lower down in the ranks of the legal profession, but struggling to reach the top of the food chain.

With an increasing number of women going on to study law, it remains to be seen whether this will be reflected in the senior make-up of firms and chambers in years to come.

13 Comments

Anonymous

*Gasp*

So more women are studying law than men? With the result that women now outnumber men 2 to 1?

This is an outrage! Where’s the equality? Where’s the fairness? We should be demanding that universities set aside spaces exclusively for male students, to address this imbalance. We should be going into schools and actively targeting male pupils to bring them into the legal world.

*End sarcasm*

Or maybe men and women just make different choices because they have different priorities, and provided that no man who wishes to study law is disadvantaged because of his gender, then there actually isn’t a problem at all.

Of course, the same reasoning would also apply when it comes to the career choices men and women freely choose to make

(43)(5)

John Linklater spins in his tomb

It won’t change the fact that there’ll be plenty of unemployed female law graduates.

These bloated numbers of law students, female or not, are completely out of whack.

(17)(1)

Anonymous

This article was very, don’t be a sarcastic prick.

(0)(11)

Anonymous

You know damn well that SJWs like Proudman use such differences in the legal profession as proof of sexism and a justification of affirmative action.

You also know damn well that the same people would never use these same differences in the university industry as justification for affirmative action in men’s favour.

Pointing out this blatant hypocrisy and double standards is fully justified.

(26)(2)

Anonymous

No one has ever used the phrase ‘SJW’ unironically who wasn’t a keyboard bashing retard.

(0)(20)

Anonymous

This article was very neutral, no need for the hostility.

(1)(15)

Anonymous

Err, not really. See KK’s final two paragraphs:

“The influx of female law students is part of an ongoing trend of women flourishing lower down in the ranks of the legal profession, but struggling to reach the top of the food chain.

With an increasing number of women going on to study law, it remains to be seen whether this will be reflected in the senior make-up of firms and chambers in years to come.”

The implication is that a numerical imbalance against women at career level is a matter of concern, while a similar imbalance against men at university is fine. That is anything but neutral.

(24)(1)

Bored Anon

2007, number of people accepting places in uni over was around 413k, now it is 532k, increase of around 29%, so would actually say as a proportion people applying to law is down.

From last year to this year, is around 4% increase in people accepting places in uni.

So all in all I would say a 1% decrease in proportion of students overall choosing law degree over others.

But the female/male statistics are interesting and I havn’t been bothered to check if that corresponds with changes.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

Those stats are about as exciting as contact with Charlie Sheen’s ball yoghurt.

(6)(1)

Anonymous

Not everyone study’s law to practice law, the figures are nonsense

(1)(2)

Anonymous

Llllloooooooooolllll

“study’s” – am dying over here right now!!!!

(10)(0)

Anonymous

A heavily feminised profession leads to more part-time workers as many decide to have families. Working part-time may be ok for non-contentious legal work, but it may well impact adversely on cases where client commitment is vital, such as complex criminal ones.

(3)(4)

Anonymous

That’s because universities are popping up like car parks. Some of them give out firsts like smarties.

(4)(0)

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