Analysis

Is it ‘judgment’ or ‘judgement’?

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21

Row breaks out as two former Lord Chancellors keep the ‘e’

feat

The legal profession has been rocked by what many view as an unpardonable misspelling by two highly esteemed lawyers.

Writing this morning in the Daily Mail, former Lord Chancellors Baron Irvine of Lairg and Baron Mackay of Clashfern used ‘judgement’ with an ‘e’ to describe the Brexit, er, judgment.

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During a week in which many have found their whole world view called into question by political events, there are fears that this could be the last straw for some. Indeed, 11KBW silk Sean Jones QC seemed to be struggling to come to terms with what had happened, as he tweeted:

Having been told by top journalist and Legal Cheek contributor Joshua Rozenberg that “both spellings are widely used”, Jones responded with a tale from personal experience:

Derry once expressed himself with characteristic firmness on the issue when I drafted some submissions for him.

But Rozenberg was standing his ground:

Happily, as the debate continued to rage, barrister and judge James Turner QC was able to establish a consensus, which he illustrated with a helpful example.

But just when you thought that some certainty had arrived into an increasingly hard to understand world, Rozenberg — whose honorary QC status combined with his Twitter blue tick arguably places him above Turner in rank — chipped back in with the final word:

Sorry lawyers, it looks like the press might have won this latest power struggle. But then again, does anyone listen to the mainstream media anymore?

21 Comments

Anonymous

Since the Daily Mail’s “house style” on most legal issues is “hysterical and largely incorrect conjecture written by halfwits who don’t have a clue”, this letter would be inconsistent with the house style no matter how they spell judgment/judgement

(64)(3)

Anonymous

What a witty comment.

(11)(3)

Interloper

Bollocks they did.

The bulbs at the Daily Heil typed the letters up for printing and the spell checker added that.

Elementary my dear Whatthef… Nothing to see here. Please disperse.

(17)(0)

Anonymous

“Enjoy the ment” – Jason Genova

(0)(0)

Anonymous

” Rozenberg — whose honorary QC status combined with his Twitter blue tick arguably places him above Turner in rank” – How does an honorary QC with a Twitter blue tick beat a normal QC and Judge in rank? I know Rozenberg writes for this website and is a well respected legal commentator but that is a bit much. Next you will be telling us he outranks the Lord Chief Justice.

(18)(2)

Anonymous

I outrank, outfight and outfart the Lord Chief Justice.

(6)(0)

Anonymous

I think it’s Legal Cheek’s notoriously riotous sense of humour striking again.

(6)(1)

Anonymous

Wow, you really don’t understand sarcasm, do you?

(2)(2)

Lord Harley of Counsel (fee charging McKenzie Friend)

It’s “judgment”, obviously.

(4)(3)

Ciaran Goggins

What if one is judging jugs?

(0)(0)

Doc Litevsky

We have had a dedicated psychiatric team here for 6 months. We despair.

(0)(0)

Judging the judge-ers

“I still spell it ‘judgement’.”

“After all this time?”

“Always.”

… Said Dumbledore and Snape NEVER.

(2)(1)

Anonymous

A legal judgment is a “judgment”. A moral or ethical one is a “judgement”. Simple.

(12)(1)

Anonymous

Easy question be easy.

Remember that a lot of articles are ghostwritten following a telephone interview.

(2)(2)

Anonymous

It was a letter not an article.

Interloper may be right about the spelling adopted by the Mail when the letter was subbed.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

I wonder if LC will ever cover something more interesting, like the implosion of King & Wood Mallesons

(2)(0)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

What about “readership, who”,
Surely “which” & amend the following words ?

(0)(0)

James Turner QC

Sorry folks, but I should make it clear that I’m not in fact a judge (not even a part-time one), so I don’t know where that part of the description of me came from.

(2)(1)

Comments are closed.