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Brexit: Freshfields tops Ireland’s lawyer transfer list

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A record-breaking 1,347 new solicitors will be added to the Irish roll by the end of the year

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Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer has had more lawyers than any other City firm register in the Republic of Ireland in the wake of the Leave vote.

According to the Law Society of Ireland, the magic circle giant — which recently revealed its London offices will be moving into a brand new skyscraper — has seen 117 of its top legal minds added to the Irish roll.

But the Anglo-German outfit isn’t alone. Eversheds has had 86 of its lawyers transfer, followed by Slaughter and May with 40, and then Hogan Lovells with 34.

Described as a “tsunami of new solicitors”, the Irish Law Society revealed 1,347 new names will be added to the roll by the end of the year, a whopping 275% increase compared to 2015. And with an administration fee of €300 (£250) per lawyer, this is one tsunami the society’s bigwigs are presumably happy to see.

Ken Murphy, the society’s director general, suggested somewhat unsurprisingly that the recent influx of solicitors wishing to cross-qualify was a direct result of “Brexit-driven transfer decisions”. Continuing, he said:

This they have been perfectly entitled to do since the mutual-recognition regime between the two jurisdictions was first put in place since 1991. The single word that dominates all assessments of the potential impact of Brexit is ‘uncertainty’. So far, the Law Society of Ireland has no knowledge that any of the England-based firms intend to open an office in this jurisdiction.

Earlier this summer, and prior to the referendum vote, several City outfits were already taking steps to register their EU and competition lawyers in Ireland over fears the United Kingdom would no longer be an EU-registered country. Following a surprising win for the Leave side, precautionary measures appear to be quickly developing into solid plans of action.

City law firm Brexit transfer list (number of lawyers)

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15 Comments

Anonymous

I wouldn’t be surprised if City firms start looking into opening in Dublin once Art 50 is triggered etc. At the very least, it’s a much cheaper market than London so why not base a few EU-focused lawyers now that they are cross-qualified.

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Anonymous

Rumour has it commercial property is in very short-supply and, as one would expect, is attracting quite a premium.

I would expect to see a range of commercial developments popping up in the very near future.

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Swansea Llb

Hey guys llb student here. Can I get that TC with freshfields?????

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Anonymous

FUCK OFF.

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Swansea Llb

Least you could do is answer me you fucking cretin

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Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

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Swansea Llb

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

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Not Amused

DOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM!!

Woooooo! Doooom!

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Pantman

The unintended consequences of Brexit dogma: those that are able take part in a new brain drain, facilitating their ability to transfer their skills into the largest market in the region. The less well skilled are unable to do the same, so are fucked by their own stupidity and the dogma of English nationalists who led them up the garden path (the only people taking control are the new range of politicians popping-up).

This is undemocratic and inequitable.

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Not Amused

Oh dear god. Who knew that the 21st Century would see, with the death of religion, that a poorly run and inefficient trade agreement that got slightly carried away on it’s own rhetoric would become the new shining cause for those in need?

To paraphrase the Bard “we all have cause to wail the dimming of Juncker’s shinning star”

There are just a tiny tiny number of weirdly obsessive EU supporters. I sort of feel sorry for you. If the EU had reformed I might have voted Remain. But it didn’t. It never will. It’s not gonna. It’s doomed.

No amount of weirdo obsessive confirmation bias will help when the whole thing goes tits up. And Ireland will have to come out anyway – you will have read the 5 President’s Plan I am *sure*.

… honestly … grumble grumble … patronised by people far less intelligent than me … anyone would think I was appearing in the Family Division ….

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Pantman

It’s the nature of governance that it is poorly run – look what the Conservatives have failed to achieve since 2010.

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Not Amused

No. There is poorly run. Then there is suicidally run:

1) plan to harmonise corporate tax rates;
2) plans for a financial transaction tax;
3) wilful refusal to implement a single market in services;
4) failure to recapitalise Eurozone banks post 2008;
5) failure to tackle member state corruption;
6) failure to tackle EU corruption;
7) the Euro

I could go on but any *one* of these 7 would destroy the EU on their own.

Did it never occur to you to ask why Juncker drinks?

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Pantman

Did it never occur to you to ask why Juncker drinks?

And you only partake in hallucinogens?

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Anonymous

Easy sign off procedure.

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