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The best use of social media that we’ve seen this year

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Which solicitors, barristers and students have been wowing their peers?

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Law is a notoriously conservative and confidential profession. But in the social media age, an increasing number of firms and chambers have bucked the ‘closed book’ approach by sharing images, videos and messages online.

Though the past year has seen a number of lawyers jump on the bandwagon and set up their own profiles, there have been some standout social media moments. Here, in no particular order, we profile ten of the best, with the winner to be announced at the Legal Cheek Awards on 16 March.

Life in a Law Firm

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Run entirely by trainees at City giant RPC, @LifeinaLawFirm gives its followers an unashamedly honest account of what it’s really like to be a trainee solicitor. Tweets are sent without having to be approved by supervisors, giving the account an authentic and honest feel. It’s very refreshing for a law firm to take the initiative to cut through the graduate recruitment brochure veneer.

Emoticon Case Law

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Combining precedent and emoticons seems an unlikely match, yet there’s just something so right about @Emoticoncaselaw. With everything from R v Brown to Factortame, alongside more recent Brexit legal challenge coverage, this Twitter account is sure to fulfill your case law loving needs.

Hogan Lovells’ collaboration with Aspiring Solicitors

Global law firm Hogan Lovells hooked up with diversity initiative Aspiring Solicitors in December to share the story of Rachel: a proud lesbian lawyer and first generation graduate who stormed to City success thanks to AS’s help. Training contract interviews are extremely daunting, so a video to help ease the fear gets a thumbs up from Legal Cheek.

The Cambridge Bubble

This nifty Instagram account, run by Cambridge law student Hephzibah, documents what it’s really like to study at one of the most elite universities in the world. During an interview with Legal Cheek, Hephzibah explained she “wanted to dispel the myth that Cambridge is just about working 24/7”. With over 7,500 followers and counting, her message seems to be getting through.

Client stories by Fletchers

Medical negligence law firm Fletchers no doubt has some interesting clients. Late last year, the firm shared some incredibly touching client stories with its Twitter following. Featured cases about Sam, who lost his leg after a motorbike accident, and Janice, whose family, friends and pets have helped her recovery after a brain injury, can be accessed here and here.

Joshua Rozenberg’s Facebook page

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Sharing his legal affairs wisdom with the masses this year is top journalist Joshua Rozenberg QC. Revealing the latest news and gossip on, for example, the Brexit legal challenge, terrorism laws and Liz Truss, his Facebook profile is a must for law students interested in current affairs.

The Legal Diaries

Now blogging about the training contract application process has become a staple of law student websites and career resources, perhaps it was simply a matter of time before YouTubers latched onto the trend. Leading the way is Coleen Mensa, an incoming trainee whose law-themed vlogs have proved an invaluable resource for TC seekers. You can read Legal Cheek’s interview with Mensa here.

Tunde Okewale and Urban Lawyers

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Doughty Street barrister Tunde Okewale is the most followed lawyer on Instagram. Now an MBE, Okewale continues to use his social media savvy to boost Urban Lawyers, a social mobility charity founded and run by the barrister himself. Urban Lawyers also has a popular Instagram account, which you can check out here.

Pupillage Interviews Uncovered

β€˜Pupillage Interviews Uncovered’ shows four successfull pupillage hunters — Shanthi Sivakumaran, who has a pupillage at Lamb Building, Rebecca Keating, a future pupil at Pump Court, 1 King’s Bench Walk pupil-to-be Max Turnell, and Devereux future pupil Colm Kelly — being grilled by James Counsel, head of pupillage at Outer Temple, and Ed Connell, the chair of 5 St Andrews Hill’s pupillage committee, in interview-style conditions. The project, put together by the University of Law (ULaw), was one of the most popular features in our Careers section during 2016.

Katherine Baker’s YouTube channel

Durham law student Katherine Baker has been vlogging since 2013, and her popular YouTube channel has now amassed nearly 30,000 subscribers. Clearly a very skilled video editor, Baker vlogs on everything from what law students should carry in their bags to advice for students being bullied.

The winner of the Legal Cheek ‘Best Use of Social Media’ gong will be selected by an independent judging panel and announced at the Legal Cheek Awards on the evening of Thursday 16 March. You can view the full collection of shortlists published so far here.

11 Comments

Lawyer

Gossip lawyers
Tweet lawyers
Handbag lawyers
Instagram lawyers
Are there modules on this at Universities now?

The stuff you learn on LC.
I wait with bated breath for the “Legal Cheek Awards”
πŸ™‚

(1)(1)

LOL

Author – “by legal cheek”

Don’t be modest katie! *kissyfaceemoji*

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Anonymous

Funny how many of these are from sponsor firms. Has anyone actually heard of “litigation giant” Fletchers other than on the pages of LC?

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Anonymous

Nope.

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Anonymous

Didn’t they win the golden turd?

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Anonymous

Nah that was the top City firm and one of LC’s puff sponsors, King Wood Mallesons.

Shame about what happened to them lol.

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Anonymous

it is less than 4 weeks into the year…slugs

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Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

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Jk

When asked the best bit of advocacy…

Surely, you have to offer Keegan’s speech to ferguson 1996. In newc v manu…. the most motivational self sustaining piece of advocacy ever… until the case was won by demonstration of talent.

The best piece of advocacy for highlighting over eagerness and arrogance.

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Ciaran Goggins

Used to have a good one until it was banned.

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Anonymous

What no Hardwicke tweeps nom’d?

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