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Simmons & Simmons puts 2016 retention woes behind it with solid 80% spring result

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9

Twelve trainees have accepted full-time associate roles

International law firm Simmons & Simmons appears to have put its 2016 woes behind it today, unveiling a solid spring retention score of 80%.

The firm, which offers around 35 training contracts annually in the UK via two intakes, revealed that 15 trainees are due to qualify this month. To break down the figures, 14 newbies applied for associate positions, with 12 receiving and subsequently accepting offers.

According to Legal Cheek’s Most List, Simmons’ newly-qualified (NQ) lawyers will pocket £68,000 a year and have an annual hours target of 1,435.

Today’s solid, but far from spectacular, result will no doubt come as a relief to the firm. Back in autumn 2016 Simmons retained just half of its trainees. From a slightly larger qualifying cohort of 24, the firm — which announced last summer it was to make a “very small number” of its London-based lawyers redundant — kept hold of just 12 NQs.

Commenting on today’s more positive result, Simmons’ graduate recruitment partner, Devarshi Saksena, said:

We are pleased with the March 2017 results and I’d like to congratulate everyone on their qualification. Trainee development is an important part of the strategy of the firm and we’re receiving great feedback on our new skills academy. I wish all our trainees the very best for the future.

Simmons — which scored As for training and peer support in the Legal Cheek Trainee and Junior Lawyer Survey — is now the ninth City firm to reveal its spring score. Kicking off another exciting retention season back in December, magic circle outfit Slaughter and May trumpeted a perfect 100% result, hanging on to all 25 of its NQs.

Other firms to have released their 2017 figures are Macfarlanes (100%), Mayer Brown (100%), Trowers & Hamlins (93%), Hogan Lovells (79%), Herbert Smith Freehills (77%), Clifford Chance (67%) and Berwin Leighton Paisner (55%).

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9 Comments

Anonymous

Given the hours, £68,000 is pretty bad. Unless, of course, the bank will agree to give one a mortgage against the salary and the prestige / TOPness of one’s firm.

(6)(2)

Anonymous

Ridiculous.

1435 target doesn’t seem too bad actually.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

This figure is slightly misleading given that 4 of the trainees who were retained were given 6 month fixed term contracts. You can do the math on that but it’s not a great result, and the woes are hardly behind them. Fully invite your team to check that this is correct but equally expect that the response will be something vague and along the lines of “no comment”.

(5)(0)

Anonymous

How do firms justify giving their trainees a 6-month FTC? Why would anyone accept that?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Simmons and simmons are so up themselves that they think they can do whatever they want to their employees

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Which is funny because there is hardly anything about that firm that’d justify such attitude.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

People need jobs. That’s why you take it. End of a training contract is effectively one big redundancy consultation for all qualifying trainees, without any redundancy pay at the end of it (as you haven’t been an employee for long enough to get any).

You might think as an outsider that trainees make fat stacks, but the reality is that rent and long hours make for high costs of living and not much opportunity to build up reserves for job seeking after the end of seat four.

(0)(0)

Cindy

Que bien Proceso, no todo en este pais es mierda. Si algun dia se exhibe como deberia de ser el redlutaso de esa eleccion sera gracias a este tipo de acciones.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Simmons & Simmons manipulate the figures every round – I am not sure why this is a surprise! I’d be more concerned about the number of associates and partners that they are haemorrhaging which are not part of their redundancy rounds!

(0)(0)

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