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Video: Students wow Lady Hale with BPTC rap to Coolio’s ‘Gangsta’s Paradise’

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The deputy Supreme Court president said she ‘enjoyed’ it

Two students had their Cumberland Lodge audience in stitches this weekend with a rap about the trials and tribulations of studying the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC).

The aspiring barristers performed the rap, a rendition of Coolio’s ‘Gangsta’s Paradise’, at a Gray’s Inn qualifying session on Saturday night (video in full below).

Caught on camera, singer and aspiring barrister Will Bebb can be heard chanting: “Life for me is an application, from pupillage, tenancy then maybe QC, but who am I kidding? Nobody even wants me”.

The Birmingham University LLB graduate and Cardiff University BPTC student later tells his chuckling audience: “Now tell me why are we, so blind to see? We should have just done, the LPC!”. His friend and fellow BPTC-er Joe Morgan can be seen playing the guitar.

It’s a brave move getting on stage and rapping in front of a room full of people, made braver still by the fact deputy Supreme Court president Lady Hale was sat in the audience. As treasurer of Gray’s Inn, the sole female justice tries to attend all of its qualifying events. We have word from the Supreme Court that Hale watched the rap, and said she “enjoyed” it.

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20 Comments

Anonymous

I’m pleased he explained what song he was trying to spoof…

(6)(7)

Anonymous

That’s so cringe.

(16)(16)

Anonymous

Twenty years ago japes like that would have stayed in the room and the attendees’ memories (maybe). Now that footage will be with him forever. It’s a sad development but youngsters really should have it drummed into them that they won’t want this shit dredged up when they’re applying for silk or becoming high court judges.

(11)(21)

Legally Grey

NA, is that you? It sounds like you…

(5)(1)

Not Amused

How odd. I don’t think it sounds like me. I’m saddened you think I would say “shit” so gratuitously.

Nor do I ascribe to this repressive “never do anything, never say anything” mantra which infects some lawyers. I am here to encourage young people to question and dissent. To argue. To refuse to accept mainstream ideas or to be pushed in to simply believing something because others do. I am here to try to get them to challenge authority and question judges.

I don’t rush to say rude things about young people, indeed, I actively try not to. The only people I am ever rude to occupy positions of power and influence. Nor would I try to scare children that japes like this would harm your career. Indeed I find people who do to be reprehensible, petty and cruel (and most importantly – dishonest).

(18)(7)

Anonymous

It wasn’t dishonest. You are entitled to disagree with my view as much as you like but you have no basis for describing it as dishonest. It was a point sincerely made.

(0)(3)

Not Amused

Sincerity of belief cannot make an untruth true.

If you know, or ought to know, that something is untrue and you wilfully disseminate it then that is dishonest.

I also question the motive – which I find distasteful.

(6)(7)

Anonymous

I think you need to look up what sincere means. If something is sincere then by definition it is not dishonest. You can doubt the truth of what I’ve said but you have no ground to question my belief in its truth (i.e. my sincerity). From reading your contributions to this site I had assumed you were a lawyer, but you can’t be because otherwise you wouldn’t accuse others of dishonesty without grounds. If you did that in court you wouldn’t last five minutes.

(0)(0)

Legally Grey

Yeah, fair enough. I didn’t give it much thought TBH. Just picked up on the theme of nostalgia and banging on about the yoof of today…

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Don’t be such a kill joy. He would have no reason to later regret this, it’s just light hearted fun. The profession suffers a great deal more from stuffy old opinions about ‘youngsters’ than it does from a video camera.

(32)(2)

Anonymous

I bet both the previous commenters are under 23.

(3)(2)

Anonymous

Lady Hale “was sat in the audience”. Such eloquent use of language, Katie.

(16)(4)

AllHailHale

Absolutely brilliant! The seal of approval from the highest ever female judge in history is likely to carry more weight than any comments down here!

(19)(7)

Anonymous

What was she going to say? That was amusing/a bit cringe but a poor display of judgment? Whatever she really thought she’s going to be nice because that’s what people in her position do.

(5)(9)

Legally Grey

She’s not polite and nice for the sake of it, believe me. Any praise from her will have had to have been earned.

(15)(6)

Anonymous

Having been sitting near Lady Hale at that event, she was definitely clapping along and enjoying it

(13)(1)

Concerned

Could have sworn these BPTC weekends were held under Chatham House Rules…

(5)(6)

Anonymous

Having attended the event I can confirm the following:

a) there was no mention of any kind of recording embargo or ‘Chatham House Rules’ explained to students at any point during the weekend.

b) Lady Hale later followed with an equally brilliant rendition of a song – she did not say she enjoyed it to please anyone.

c) There was not a single person in the room that thought this was inappropriate or not with the keeping of the evening.

It was a great night, a great weekend and this is a great demonstration of how well Gray’s integrate students and Benchers alike.

(18)(4)

Anonymous

Having also attended this event, it was indeed stated at the beginning of the evening that everything was to be kept strictly within those four walls! Sad to see the trust between members being undermined for a cheap thrill in the media

(5)(5)

Anonymous

Lads got top bants.

(5)(0)

Comments are closed.