News

Trio of magic circle training contract offers for LSE student who grew up on council estate

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Panashe Jinga has turned down Linklaters and Allen & Overy to train at Freshfields

A London School of Economics (LSE) student who admits he didn’t have the smoothest start in life has revealed he has three magic circle training contract offers.

Panashe Jinga, who will be moving into the final year of his LLB this autumn, unveiled the news on LinkedIn, writing:

After receiving offers from Allen & Overy, Freshfields and Linklaters, I have decided to commence my training contract with Freshfields.

It’s a position any City law chaser would dream of, but it wasn’t always plain sailing for Jinga.

He told his 500+ LinkedIn connections that: “Growing up in a single parent household, in a ‘council estate’, and attending a school whilst it was put into special measures, it would have been easy for me to follow the wrong path.”

A screenshot of Panashe Jinga’s LinkedIn post

Jinga began studying in 2008 at Lawnswood High School in Leeds, which was placed into special measures in 2009 after being given a Grade 4 (Inadequate) by Ofsted for its overall effectiveness. It was taken out of special measures in 2011.

The law student credits much of his success to the “huge amount of support” he’s received, name checking RARE recruitment and the Stephen Lawrence Scholarship. The former is a pro-diversity legal recruitment initiative; the latter is a programme designed to address corporate law’s underrepresentation of black men from low income households.

But a quick scan of Jinga’s profile shows why he’s deserving of the training contract offer trio. Aside from achieving a solid 2:1 in his Russell Group degree so far, Jinga has also done work experience placements at (hold your breath!): Squire Patton Boggs, Clifford Chance, Macfarlanes, Hogan Lovells, Freshfields, Allen & Overy, Herbert Smith Freehills, Linklaters, Goldman Sachs, and more.

This isn’t the first time a City law hopeful has wowed us with their training contract stock.

Last year, we reported that a philosophy, politics and economics (PPE) student from the University of York, who hadn’t even studied law yet, had received offers from Clifford Chance, Freshfields and Slaughter and May. Selena Pope said she was “humbled” by the offers, and that she’d accepted a place at Freshfields. She will commence her solicitor training in 2018.

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190 Comments

Anonymous

Very little I loathe more in the world than blowing one’s own trumpet. Great achievement, but just unnecessary to brag.

(117)(46)

Mr autofellatio

I like blowing me own trumpet

(15)(5)

Anonymous

You wish you could see it under your muffin top

(1)(0)

Friend of Panashe

This comment would not have been made if you actually met the kind-hearted and gem of an individual that Panashe is. Incredibly easy to make such remarks behind a computer screen.

(32)(23)

Anonymous

Irrelevant whether you’ve met him or not. Posting something like this shows a remarkable lack of self awareness. Most people would be aware that such a post would not go down well with a majority of people.

(11)(19)

Friend of Panashe

“Remarkable lack of self awareness” is a bit harsh. I think contextualising this is also important. I am not sure if you are a frequent user of it, but LinkedIn as a platform is home to several posts that are quite similar to Panashe’s. Such success stories can be inspiring for many too.

(19)(7)

Anonymous

success stories can be inspiring if they are also humble. explicitly stating which TC offers he got, turning them down just reeks of (for a lack of a better phrase) ‘lack of self awareness’ or just plain seeking external public validation for his achievements.

(7)(5)

Anonymous

It would only not go down well with those bitter individuals who cannot be pleased for the achievements of others.
Says more about those individuals than it says about this talented young fella

(9)(6)

Anonymous

I can be incredibly happy for someone, but this culture of announcing everything over social media just to pick up virtual likes just screams of a lack of self-awareness. It stems from self-consciousness, that you somehow have to seek exterior validation from other’s internet appreciation, rather than be self-validated by your own achievements.

Lad’s done brilliantly, but just get on with it and stop begging for other people’s approval.

(21)(3)

Anonymous

precisely this. I mean if it was genuinely meant as an inspiration, he could totally have left out the explicit mentions to the 3 MC offers he got. his choice of words and mentioning of his ‘achievements’ just reeks of showing off. I applaud him for getting there, but seriously, tone it down on the chest thumping

(5)(5)

Anonymous

And there we have a distinct lack of intelligence. You call us “bitter individuals”? What are you, some Daily Mail poster? How can anybody in 2017 be publicised as some great success story claiming racial disadvantage (black! boo hoo!) , housing disadvantage (council house! boo hoo!) and parental disadvantage (single parent! boo hoo!), when in fact they’ve benefitted from greater privilege than most candidates who competed for this TC on the open market and on an EQUAL PLAYING FIELD.

(6)(6)

Spencer place

Good luck to him not many people get this opportunity

(3)(2)

Anonymous

“not many people get this opportunity”

Er.. that’s the positive-discriminatory problem that most of us are absolutely disgusted about.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

Not sure you speak for ‘most of us’. Some serious bitterness on this thread. White middle class people aren’t lacking from opportunities from a quick survey of the trainees at the MC firm I work at.

Anonymous

9:52 – what opportunity did a white middle class person have for getting a TC, that Panashe didn’t, precisely?

Anonymous

It’s such a patronising article. Legal Cheek wake up – black man gets job isn’t news! And I’m black!

(10)(2)

Anonymous

This is patronising – just because he’s black – shame on you Legal Cheek

(7)(1)

Anonymous

This is condescending and patronising and an all time low by Legal Cheek. Black man gets a job in the City is NOT news! I’m black and I’m fuming at this article. Please stick to your usual content about pouting people on Instagram

(9)(1)

Anonymous

These three anonymous comments are definitely the same person – lossssssssssssssseeeeerrrrrrrrrr

(4)(2)

Anonymous

The 3 comments above are almost certainly the same person – waaaaster

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Le trois – c’est la meme. Idioooot

(1)(0)

Anonymous

The 3 comments written above this are in all probability the same writer. Stoooooooopid

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Based on an algorithm, it is clear that the 3 comments written above were actually just one person emphasising one point, three times. Fooooool

(1)(0)

Camilla

STOP BITTER U CUNT

(1)(1)

BAME

I’m gonna live foreverrrrrrrr

(7)(3)

Council estate City associate

I’m from a council estate, first in my family to go to University (etc), where’s my article?

(69)(9)

Hood Rat

If you create a website that substantially documents your rise including quotes from family and friends, photos, and video content, I am sure you will get some air time in the legal press.

(21)(1)

Anonymous

Legal cheek’s journalism is stuck in the 70s – black man gets job isn’t news!!

(8)(1)

Anonymous

I’m black and these articles do more harm than good. In this day and age this shouldn’t be highlighted as news. It’s so condescending – let’s give the black chap a clap for working in a suit. Please rethink in the future Legal Cheek – I know you have to get clicks – but this is desperate.

(10)(2)

Anonymous

Totally agree – but sadly not surprised by Legal Cheek. The writers fail to engage their brains and just churn out anything they see on social media for clicks. This is very patronising.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

I agree. I hope you are also enraged that there’s also a recruitment company whose focus is based on only supporting ethnic minorities, and not white candidates, that there are companies who go to this recruiter specifically to get CVs of such minorities in a ring-fenced manner, and that this recruiter has a Rising Star celebration – only of black people!

It’s hard to believe that in 2017 this happens, that any company would use such a recruiter, or is even legal.

(2)(2)

Anonymous

Privileged council estate resident; unlike the under-privileged lot who have to pay our own rents set at higher levels, unsubsidized by the taxpayer.

(23)(10)

Anonymous

Council estates were built for the underprivileged to aim towards a more level playing field and equality for people. The fact you didn’t need this means you are not underprivileged. Jealous of other people’s genuine hard work and dedication?

(9)(4)

Anonymous

Did his single parent get to buy the council house provided to them by you and me, at a below-market value and pocket a huge profit from it, unlike the rest of us under-privileged non-council tenants who never get that chance and have to buy property at full price?

(13)(13)

Anonymous

Get the violins out…..
Bitter towards people living in areas of poverty and deprivation? What a pitiful individual you are.

(7)(4)

Anonymous

Yes, Notting Hill is such an area of poverty and deprivation isn’t it…?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Congratulations Panashe!! Well done!

(38)(5)

Anonymous

Looking at the other comments here – I don’t think Panashe will be too chuffed that Legal Cheek wrote this silly piece!

(2)(0)

Positive Soul

Well done and ignore all the haters.

(20)(25)

Jason

I’m sure he will fit in just fine…….

(22)(5)

Anonymous

I am sure he will. What was your point anyway?

(13)(6)

Anonymous

Cuck.

(5)(6)

Anonymous

Duck.

(2)(1)

Anonymous

Muck.

(0)(2)

Anonymous

Schmuck

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Truck.

(0)(0)

FF Associate

So glad to have a super star in our ranks. Looking forward to breaking this one.

(55)(2)

Anonymous

… classy.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Looking forward to seeing if he’ll be retained afterwards (diversity hires LOL)

(22)(28)

Anonymous

What makes you think this is a diversity hire?

(13)(12)

Anonymous

LOL he studies at LSE… you get accepted on merit, so clearly he’s smart enough to train at FF! So pull a next one!

(20)(2)

Anonymous

This sort of shit seriously pisses me off. I’m the only black trainee in one of the largest intakes in the city but somehow I often get cunts saying that I had an advantage because of my race. I wouldn’t qualify for any of the disadvantaged backgrounds schemes because both parents went to university and I went to a private school.

I went through the same application process and had to pass the same aptitude tests as every other candidate. The firm didn’t even know my race until I arrived at interview. Yet I still have people questioning my competence because black trainee must mean diversity hire. Fuck off.

(68)(8)

Anonymous

Hear hear.

(12)(0)

Anonymous

Quite right, you should be seriously pissed off. Because of these racially-based positive discrimination actions, everyone will always look at you in that way and be suspicious.

(11)(11)

The pissed off trainee

That’s not even how it worked when I was applying though. Most firms I applied to had a positive discrimination scheme through “rare recruitment”. This only looked at household income and parental education. The section of the form which asked for race explicitly stated it was only for statistical monitoring and would not be made available to the firm during the application process.

Most of the race based diversity schemes have nothing to do with the direct application process and do little more than offer you a place at an open day talk.

(9)(2)

Anonymous

how do you deal with those cunts?

(3)(0)

Jason

Salty cookie cutter.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

And why the fuck do you assume a diversity hire must equal subordinate competence?

Diversity is about representation AND competence.

(11)(6)

Dragonfly

What a naive comment. If you take two variables into account, you’re clearly going to get different results than if you only take one variable into account.

(10)(4)

Anonymous

Agree with this point – I’m also a black lawyer and articles like this by Katie King / Legal Cheek are irresponsible click-baiting journalism. I will be avoiding LC from now on.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

I do hope you will avoid RARE and all its privileged queue-jumping candidates, as the true click-baiting is the PR release that RARE would have prepared with the cooperation of Jinga which they sent out to media, hoping they’d report on this and the self-congratulations and look-at-me-look-at-me of Paneshe Jinga himself.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Agree – Legal Cheek shouldn’t be writing these articles.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

So you mean to say all my white privilege and family wealth accounts for nothing?! I’m going to the Ombudsman.

(8)(13)

Anonymous

😀

(0)(0)

Anonymous

ah the recruitment programme……..offered to all races and creeds equally of course……….ah the scholarship……..offered to all races and creeds equally of course……….ah the diversity hire…..offered to etc etc

(20)(15)

Anonymous

bu’ bu’ white privilege

(12)(6)

Anonymous

This comment section will one day give me a brain cancer, honestly. Why can’t we just be happy for the folk?

(36)(9)

Trumpenkrieg

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(3)(2)

Anonymous

The one from last year is worse – I don’t understand how having 3 offers is press-coverage worthy. Embarrassing.

(16)(5)

Anonymous

I did a double take on this…Lawnswood – special measures- and a council estate in inverted commas. To my surprise, it is true Lawnswood , as Wikipedia says, is one of the most expensive areas in Leeds for property but its 1972 school did go into special measures . The sixth forn was always good. Leeds uni has accommodation there as it is only 4 miles from the centre. If the Council estate is Moor Grange the inverted commas could be because it is known as a model council estate , rather than a sink estate, and Wikipedia says most of the properties are privately owned. I think the idea therefore that the chap could easily have strayed from the straight and narrow may have been a play for scholarship glory but the inverted commas give me hope that he may turn out more like Martin Luther King than Barack Obama. Wouldn’t that be a refreshing change !

(6)(4)

Libeturd Leftie

OK, I’ll bite, disregarding most of your self indulgent diatribe, what is the material difference between Barack Obama and Martin Luther King, please enlighten us oh wise one.

(4)(1)

Anonymous

Christianity contained elements of a creed which celebrated human psychology at its highest. Corporate America, human psychology at its lowest. MLK was a product of the former creed, influenced by Gandhi. BO the latter and he never courted the former. Corporate America will never deliver “all of God’s children joining hands and singing ‘free at last, free at last thank god almighty we are free at last’ . MLK and probably JFK and RK could have if they had had a proper run.

(0)(0)

Libeturd Leftie

What are you on about… honestly. On second thought never mind.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

“But a quick scan of Jinga’s profile shows why he’s deserving of the training contract offer trio.”

Ah, no no and no. A quick scan of the involvement of RARE and the Stephen Lawrence scholarship, which recruits based on race, means by its very nature that he has not in fact deserved the offers, he has applied within a select group of privileged queue-jumpers and has won his place within that group only.

Had he deserved it in a truly meritocratic manner, he would have applied on the open market and earned his place as would everyone else.

Good. So now we all know how he got there. Could we have a profile of the non-RARE and non racially-advantaged scholarship winner who lost their deserving place because of him?

(32)(30)

Anonymous

RARE does NOT recruit based on race. Also, those who qualify under RARE do apply on the open market – the only difference is that the tool would highlight that their achievements (or lack thereof) were made in spite of their potentially underprivileged/privileged backgrounds.

If someone who graduated with 3 As at A-Level from a rubbish sixth form in Peckham was up against a privately-educated person with the same grades, the tool would highlight the circumstances in which their respective grades were achieved.

(35)(14)

Anonymous

ha ha – take a look at the website, not based on race my foot! Candidates are put forward by a racially-discriminating organisation and “disadvantage” is automatically presumed down to race. A white person who went through hell would be classed as “tradition” and would not receive any of the support that the privileged elite of Rare do. Nobody should hire through Rare, it’s disgusting.

(18)(17)

Anonymous

This simply isn’t true – to qualify, your application would need to accrue a certain amount of points. Ethnic background is just one of the things that would contribute to one’s tally. Others include caring for a vulnerable person, coming to the country as an asylum seeker, being part of the first generation in your household to pursue higher education, spending more than three months in local authority care, being eligible for free school meals, etc. Underprivileged white people have benefited from RARE recruitment (and other diversity initiatives).

(17)(8)

Anonymous

How many points does being black get you? Or indian? Or white?
How many points do you get for having a chaotic home life in isolated suburbia with two warring parents struggling to pay the mortgage/rent and no support whatsoever?
How many points do you get for having a loving single parent home in a strong community, in a home handed to your parent on a plate, paying below market rent, with every welfare project of help, assistance and money directed at you and benefitting from positive discrimination?

(6)(6)

Anonymous

You could be white and poor and still apply lmao get your facts checked out

(12)(7)

Anonymous

I’m a RARE candidate and I’m a white working class first generation female sooooo

(23)(6)

Anonymous

Are you good looking? Good looking females can get by on looks to a certain extent.

(6)(14)

Anonymous

If your “get by” refers to getting on the programme it was probably because I worked my arse off and got first class marks in the first year of uni despite being first gen and from a crap state school and passed the interview process. If you mean “get by” in life well then I’m fairly sure getting first class marks across the board in second year, doing 4 vacation schemes (2 at MC firms), having extra curriculars, having other work experience (legal and non legal) as well as commercial awareness and being a decent person who can hold an intelligent and personable conversation contributed more to me attaining a TC at a MC firm than the standard of my physical appearance.

(14)(4)

Anonymous

Told

(3)(1)

Anonymous

Working class and you did two mc vac schemes well done , if a genuine post.

Anonymous

I’m genuinely curious – what disadvantage do you have?

(6)(0)

Anonymous

No answer yet.

Anonymous

Still no answer. She’s gone very quiet suddenly…

Libeturd Leftie

#PREACH! Let the chu’ch say Amen!!

(0)(0)

Anonymous

You have commercial awareness? What does that even mean?

Anonymous

From Rare’s website just now:

“we specialise in helping ethnic minority candidates”

(11)(3)

Anonymous

They have 2 programmes: Discuss and Articles. One focuses on BAME, one does not.

(2)(7)

Anonymous

Direct me to the portion of their site which suggests that it exclusively caters to ethnic minority candidates.

(5)(8)

Anonymous

See the photos of applicants – all ethnic minorities
See the Rare Rising Stars programme – caters exclusively to black candidates only

(11)(1)

Anonymous

Looking at a small handful of photos published on their site is a hilariously bad way of gauging the ethnic make-up of their entire candidate cohort.

(2)(10)

Anonymous

What’s hilarious, is that Rare (and in all likelihood you) go on and on about representativeness, and role models, yet you can’t see any problem whatsoever in the lack of representation of white people anywhere on Rare’s site.

Look at their candidate profiles.. look at every damn image all over the site. You think this says nothing about their brand? For goodness’ sake.

(8)(3)

Anonymous

If you think this is unfair then take a look at the legal industry…

Anonymous

I find it very interesting that you chose to omit what immediately preceded that sentence…

Q: Is your service only for ethnic minority candidates?

“No. We help everybody.”

(5)(9)

Anonymous

Just like every country that has ‘Democratic People’s’ in its title must be default be democratic…..

(3)(1)

Anonymous

What brand of tin foil makes the best hats?

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Yo mamma’s

(1)(1)

Anonymous

I find it very interesting that you chose to omit what immediately succeeded that sentence…

Q: Is your service only for ethnic minority candidates?

“No. We help everybody… BUT WE SPECIALISE IN HELPING ETHNIC MINORITY CANDIDATES”.

I find it even more interesting that you chose to ignore EVERY SINGLE PHOTOGRAPH on EVERY SINGLE PAGE on the Rare website.

(6)(1)

CC Trainee

Oh, get a grip. You keep banging on about photographs on the website, does that mean that every firm website which only has white people represented exclusively employ white people? No. Your point is redundant, some programmes from Rare are aimed at ethnic minorities and others are opened to ALL races, the only requirement is that you must be working class.

(4)(6)

Anonymous

More from RARE’s website:

“Rare Rising Stars is an annual event which showcases the incredible achievements of the best black students in the UK.”

You can’t be a Rare Rising Star if you are white or asian. You are not a rising star in Rare’s eyes if you are white or asian. Which means you are inferior because of your race. Which means it is discrimination based on race, and it is a racist organisation and should be banned.

(12)(10)

Anonymous

You DO NOT have to be an ethnic minority to qualify as a RARE candidate. You can become a candidate if you are white. Their having individual events that focus on a particular demographic has little to no bearing on their primary focus (directing underprivileged candidates [of various ethnicities, genders and sexual orientations] to participating organisations).

(4)(7)

Anonymous

But a white or asian person does not have the same opportunity as a black person within RARE. Can’t you see the discrimination? Can’t you see the unbelievable irony?

RARE offers opportunities for people not based on merit, but purely on race. Purely on a perceived “disadvantage” according to some demographic norm that is identifiable through race, nothing to do with their individual merit as a human being.

It is the antithesis of what a decent society, wishing to address true disadvantage, should be doing.

(10)(1)

Anonymous

You’re being obtuse.

“But a white or asian person does not have the same opportunity as a black person within RARE.”

The event you highlighted is celebratory in nature – it does not mean that they will be recruiting exclusively from its attendees. In fact, I doubt it has any bearing on recruitment. The website explicitly states that you do not have to be an ethnic minority in order to qualify as a candidate.

“RARE offers opportunities for people not based on merit, but purely on race. ”

This is simply not true – ethnic background is only one portion of its recruitment framework. Others include caring for a vulnerable person, coming to the country as an asylum seeker, being part of the first generation in your household to pursue higher education, spending more than three months in local authority care, being eligible for free school meals, etc. An underprivileged white applicant that ticks these boxes would be put forward before a black applicant that doesn’t.

(2)(7)

Anonymous

There are other schemes for different demographics. If you feel you are disadvantaged in some way, go and find what’s available for you instead of playing the victim.

(1)(3)

Anonymous

“There are other schemes for different demographics.”

OK, I’ll bite. Pray tell, what schemes exist for white demographics then?

I’ll give you two options: either “specialising in” white racial groups in the way Rare specialises in ethnic racial groups, or award schemes for white-only people in the way Rare’s Rising Stars are only open to black candidates?

(2)(0)

Anonymous

I just looked at the 2016 Rare Rising Star winner. A man who studied at a British school in Saudi Arabia and whose parents are both doctors. Who then had the money from his parents to spend a gap year travelling, and the funds given to him by his parents to buy a shop whilst on his travels.

Could you explain precisely how the son of two doctors, funded entirely by well off parents, who attended a British school in Saudi (consistently excellent levels of education) is “disadvantaged”, and why he should be lauded and celebrated above anyone else who is white or asian?

(13)(1)

Anonymous

You do know that he wasn’t the winner? He came in 10th place.

Either way, more grease to his elbow! Not too sure why you’re insinuating that the fellow is pretending to be “disadvantaged”. After all, if you actually read the Rare Rising Star website, it states that the competition “showcases the incredible achievements of the best black students.” There is no need to be “disadvantaged” to win, neither is disadvantage necessarily a criterion of achievement (although, any achievement in spite of disadvantage or adversity deserves a salute, and previous winners seem to have certainly beaten the odds against them).

Looks to me like his achievements will be celebrated, whether you like it or not. But you’re welcome to carry on whinging 🙂

(3)(5)

Trumpenkrieg

Can’t these people just run branches of Carphone Warehouse? The infiltration of diversity into the legal profession will sooner or later result in a totalitarian dictatorship.

(1)(5)

Anonymous

Yawn.

Your chatter is dead weight.

The profession does not want the likes of you. The profession does not need your incessant, obtuse and pitiful racism. It’s doubly pitiful if you’re a qualified lawyer.

Away with you, and don’t forget your white hood on your way out.

(2)(2)

Anonymous

This is wholly disingenuous: applicants through Rare do not apply on the open market. The client procures the services of Rare specifically to create a pool of applicants who are within the boundary of so-called “disadvantage” and racial profiling. They are not filtered on the greater pool but have their own privileged Rare pool. Their chances of being reviewed are greater and you can bet there is a quota within the client to recruit a proportion from Rare candidates (if there wasn’t, why bother then?). Once the client has selected some from the Rare pool only, then the applications get sent out to them, and Rare candidates who are in receipt of a whole load of support, advice and coaching that the “open market” applications do not receive are then appraised on an totally unequal playing field.

Any organisation who uses Rare and appears on their website should be treated with the disdain they deserve. Remember – if you are applying to them and you’re not a Rare candidate, you are instantly disadvantaged as you are put into a bigger meritocracy pool, whilst Rare candidates are protected and pushed.

(12)(9)

Anonymous

So if you do not do well in partner interviews, they will still take you?

(2)(3)

Anonymous

If the firm is trying to meet a quota, or is terrified of being accused of racism after the result of an entirely meritocratic process results in an absence of ethnic minorities in the successful candidate list, yes, they will.

(1)(1)

Anonymous

“A quick scan of the involvement of RARE and the Stephen Lawrence scholarship…”

No prizes for guessing why you don’t have a training contract.

(10)(8)

Anonymous

Well I just googled rare. Talented black and mixed black heritage for their uni start programme are given a phone number to call. Lots of Deloitte and a & o type sponsors. This contradicts 11.16 , so please come back and explain your persistence. Kind regards

(3)(4)

Anonymous

Read 11:43.

(2)(1)

Anonymous

The uni start programme does not mention under privileged white people though, does it ? Why not ?

(8)(6)

Anonymous

Not sure – but it appears as though this is exclusive to that stream. You certainly don’t have to be black/mixed to qualify as a candidate.

(2)(6)

Anonymous

One explanation could be because the funding for upw is absent and there are no meaningful alumni.

(0)(0)

Philomenus

Even so-called “under-privileged” white people benefit from being white, so they can’t really be called “under-privileged”, and even a so-called privileged black person can still experience racism because of the colour of their skin.

End of.

Anonymous

Philomenus: I don’t think I have ever read such an idiotic, clueless and victim-obsessed comment ever. End of? People like you? We can but hope.

Anonymous

I didn’t apply through RARE recruitment or win a scholarship… In fact Aspiring Solicitors said they wouldn’t help me with applications because they knew I wouldn’t get an offer (due to my A Level grades and mitigating circumstances).

I made one application – now I’m off to FBD.

(3)(1)

Anonymous

Aspiring Solicitors are a bunch of asses

(10)(3)

Anonymous

Are you really so very ignorant of the fact that this society is not based on meritocracy at all, hence the need for this scholarship fund in the first place? Your comment supports structural racism. I guess money can’t buy decency, morals or true intelligence.

(0)(3)

Anonymous

If opportunities would be equal absent such schemes, why are trainees at City firms disproportionately white and middle class? I dread to think what your explanation is…

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Well done him and made the right choice in not choosing Anal & Ovaries.

(4)(5)

Anonymous

But as I’ve previously said, Fresh Fields was a very run of the mill comedy of its time…

(0)(0)

Anonymous

If the 1039 comment is true, that is a shame. There is no diversity away from middle class morals. I remember when a youth was chosen to go to Downside private school from a sink estate. The prize is that you raise someone from that background and give them the skill and confidence to go with their in built empathy when they find out how the rich live and thrive. They can make great changes for social justice then. They embody realistic hope. Ryan Bell was doing really well at downside and could have blazed a trail…they expelled him for underage drinking and he was heartbroken. You can Google it in the guardian. Social justice is different to the Freshfields ethnic minority scholarship of course. Sad face.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Ryan Bell was a knob. He clearly deserved his expulsion.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

I think it is more likely that the school realised it has created an antidote which nobody from downsides constituency wanted. Everybody involved with teaching would have realised that if Ryan had gone to oxford and been as good there, it would have turned the world upside down.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Question: why do candidates who hold multiple MC offers such as this young man and the young lady the previous year and peers that I know always seem to pick Freshfields?

(4)(1)

lawcity

I suppose it’s the oldest magic circle firm (and has a certain rep because of that), has a fairly flexible training contract, and is probably the strongest at M&A and disputes. Not much in it though.

(6)(1)

Anonymous

Pays more, better training.

(5)(2)

Anonymous

Why are there no white faces on the Rare website? What steps is the Stephen Lawrence organisation to address this under-representation of white and asian minorities on Rare’s website? I feel alienated and a victim.

(13)(11)

Anonymous

You’re a joke

(9)(10)

Anonymous

Check your privilege

(2)(7)

Anonymous

What privilege are you referring to exactly. Could you be more specific?

(2)(0)

Anonymous

The white one.

(0)(3)

Anonymous

“The white one”. That’s not very specific. What do you mean, precisely? What does this mean, exactly?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Yes.. didn’t think you’d be able to actually back up your ‘white privilege’ claptrap with any rational thought, evidence or even a basic explanation of what the hell you’re referring to.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Congratulations! Fantastic achievement. Ignore the haters, they’re probably bitter and on their fifth cycle of applications

(15)(7)

Anonymous

Wow. Alex and Co. really know how to set the Legal Cheek community off.

(4)(0)

Brian Scalabrini

Yeah I always wondered why they put articles like this up. Admittedly the kid could be more low key about this. But he has the grades to work at a top firm, yet all these people come out to just put him down and dismiss his achievements as being the result of affirmative action etc. I wonder if legal cheek actually get the consent of these people before they expose them like this publicly for clickbait.

(19)(0)

Anonymous

Many applicants have the grades to work at a top firm. In fact, it’s probably 100% of applicants (given the minimum requirement set for applying in the first place). But having the top grades has nothing to do with this article or the advantages this man has been given.

His achievement is a result of affirmative action taken by two race-focused organisations, and his selection (including his nomination for an award which ONLY selects from black candidates) is based solely on race, since “council house” and “school in special measures” does not appear to be a tick box on the Rare points system.

(6)(11)

Brian Scalabrini

To some extent I appreciate you engaging in polite debate despite the fact you have made certain presumptions in order to support your position. I don’t really want to spend too much time on this here but I will say the following:

a) If he is good enough to do the job (as as many others which we both accept), then why is the vehicle via which he arrived at said job important. The only reason why you would challenge that is on the basis of unfairness, which leads me to my second point.

b) The system is patently unfair anyway and we have to question therefore whether introducing unfairness in favor of others is always wrong if the outcome appears fairer (if you understand my position). I am a solicitor and whilst the days of TCs for clients kids/family are gone in the City, what does happen is that individuals are given long internships and paralegal positions which turn into vacation schemes which can then turn into TC offers. People who go via this backdoor probably number about 15-20% of the trainees I have encountered, majority of whom have been white (not entirely but the demographics of the elite in this country are what they are) and of course privately educated. Also the overwhelming majority have been female but many people like to dwell on the privileged white male stereotype which is not entirely accurate. Just my opinion and this is not even considering the resources poured into these kids via coaching, tutoring and extra-curricular activities which gives them a massive head start.

(9)(1)

Libeturd Leftie

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

well he did sort of boast of his achievements on social media…welcome to the age of chest thumping feel good-ness

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Another pathetic patronising “story” by LC (Legal Crap)

(0)(0)

Anon

That’s what Linkedin is made for dummy

(0)(0)

Not Brianna

I used to work at LC as an intern, this is exactly what they aim to do.

Lemme describe how an average LC wind-up article gets created:

Everyone’s assembled downstairs in the smokey, dusty darkness of Alex’s mum’s house basement. Alex sits at the head of the table, staring emptily, then takes a long hit off his trusty crack pipe, coughing slightly. “Ey Tommo, waddaya reckon we write about for them pinheadz today?”

Tommy shakes his head, dim as he is, and takes a mighty swig from his beloved mixture of 50:50 paint thinner and glue, then sharts violently. Katie sits in the back, too busy with her giant black dildo to bother with a response.

“Oh I kno now, let’s wind all those nasty punters up with a good ol’ diversity article! The leftie cucks’ll love it, and the racists are gonna shit their pants!” Tommy suddenly bellows.

“Fook Tommo, dis is exactly what we’ve been looking for! Imma be able to buy some more crack rocks with all dem tasty clickz, yes! Let’s do this then!” Alex says, nodding furiously and stuffing a big hunk of crack in his pipe.

Tommy smiles: he’s done good today, Alex is pleased.

(3)(1)

Anonymous

this is better than the Frustrated Writer.

(0)(1)

Anonymous

It’s the usual Legal Cheek “journalism” – how many followers does this person have on social media? Do they like to brag even though they’ve achieved relatively little in the legal world so far (wow they’ve got a training contract – impressive to LC staff who failed to get training contracts, but not to the rest of us)? Can Legal Cheek look sincere about something which is actually not news in the city these days. Articles like this are patronising – this isn’t the 70s.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

Agree it is the usual patronising pathetic Legal Cheek article – problem is it backfires on the student judging by all the negative comments. Shame – part of me thinks Legal Cheek does it on purpose just to infuriate readers and drive traffic to their site.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

You know, if this guy had just applied like everyone else through the normal recruitment adverts, and maybe sent a FB message to his friends announcing his success, and Legal Cheek picked up on that, I’d have some sympathy for him.

But he didn’t. He’s chosen to apply through Rare – he’s chosen to shove his race into the hand of cards he was playing in his application and present his race to the firms as some kind of automatic woe-me disadvantage. He’s chosen to put himself forward to be celebrated above others in a competition only for black people.

Why would anyone do that? Look at me… look at me… Classic X Factor tripe.. don’t judge me on my ability, let me try to paint a tale of hardship (apparently for Panashe being black, having a single parent and being given a council house put him at a disadvantage when he was applying for a TC, quite how that works is an utter mystery), and then brag about it and get Rare to issue loads of PR about me.

Hurrah. Not.

(1)(1)

Anonymous

I mostly agree with this. Clearly he has not suffered as a result of disadvantage given his qualifying go attend LSE.

He should have applied directly without the Racist And Regressive Entity (RARE) involvement.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

good for him. as someone who also went through the rare process, he’s no different to a lot of exceptional rare candidates who have a similar backstory and end up also training at top firms.

(4)(3)

Anonymous

Can anyone tell me why someone who doesn’t contribute in tutorials, just sits there and talks about cats (no active uni life) is about to start training in a MC firm simply because of a diversity scholarship whilst another guy/girl who is more competent than her is about to get deported as his/her visa’s running out? thanks!

(4)(3)

Anonymous

Brexit. Lobby for a second referendum.

(3)(3)

Anonymous

Are you referring to the young man the article is about or someone else?

(1)(0)

Anonymous

I smell bitterness hahaha I can basically taste the tears dripping on your screen

(2)(1)

Anonymous

Because natural talent can’t be taught?

(0)(0)

Black State Schooled Future City Law Trainee (who applied on the open market)

Most people are hammering RARE for their obvious focus on getting black kids into the city, which we could debate. I personally don’t have problem with that.

What I think is the bigger problem is that they are not actually achieving their goal. They mainly focus on black kids from wealthy backgrounds, who go to good schools, and who have been brought up in stable families. In all likelihood, these folk are likely to get TCs anyway.

All RARE are really doing is cherry picking the kids who are going to get TCs and then applauding themselves on the back for it. In a way they are helping to build diversity within the city, but not in a particularly ground breaking or productive way.

On the other hand some could argue that if there weren’t agencies like RARE then even the posh black kids wouldn’t have a chance, because of their skin colour. Not sure if I buy into that, but either way, I can see why positive discrimination rubs people up the wrong way.

(17)(1)

Anonymous

There is some truth here. I know of wealthy ethnic kids who don’t get TCs despite all their good education. They mostly end up going back to their countries and making more money than a TC or partnership could ever offer and I’m very happy for them.

On RARE, they are definitely cherry picking. I went to the LSE and I remember that we HAD TO APPY to join RARE. They vetted us seriously and rejected some people. My suspicion is that the thought some people (ie inner city, non polished speaking students) were not up to it. Most of us ended up with TCs but I’m easily convinced we could have done it without RARE. Throughout my time with RARE, all they did was make useless comments about how I need to be great and all. The LSE careers service on the other hand, was 1000 times more helpful in actually giving me interview practice and follow ups. Rare on the other hand, usually made it seem like they were doing you a favour, when it was you actually doing them a favour.

(6)(0)

Anonymous

I met Panashe at the Stephen Lawrence Freshfields Scholarship event last year, lovely young man and really well deserved… Proud

(7)(4)

Anonymous

Lovely…do you know how Freshfields makes its money ? They are one of the biggest groups of lawyers acting for corporations throughout the whole world !

(0)(0)

Belinda

What a lovely young man. I see he is getting a lot of criticism but it is not fair. I can tell from the photograph of him that he is genuinely intelligent, and that he has the enthusiasm and work ethic to succeed. I have an eye for these things. Not that it is particularly relevant, I must say that he is rather handsome. I wonder if he is after the company of an older lady with the experience to continue to guide him to even greater successes. It is always important to have the occasional relaxing, perhaps sensual, soak in the bath after a tiresome day. I imagine he has rather soft skin.

(5)(0)

Diane Abbott

Hands off b**ch.

(7)(2)

Anonymous

Please raise a smile for us all by reminding us how you came to get an eye for these things, Belinda 🙂

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Belinda, you naughty woman! He is surely under half your age!

(1)(1)

Belinda's PA

I am not sure if Belinda will get back to you today. She has closed the blinds to her office but I can just about see through them. Her legs are up on the desk, her shoes are off, and I can quite clearly hear the Black Beauty soundtrack coming from underneath the door. She watches that a lot.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(0)

Jones Day Trainee

Don’t remind me.

(2)(0)

Corbyn. Symphathiser

This is disgraceful.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Panashe – I take my hat of to you and wish you well in your career.

(4)(4)

Grizzly associate

Suspect he may not take being given a dull but completely necessary bundling or document review task at 9pm very well. Humility and an understanding of the need to not project an appearance of arrogance or smugness are key virtues for a trainee to possess.

(6)(3)

Anonymous

So what then happens after a few years ? Or is it on becoming a partner that one’s inner arsehole, suppressed for so many years, comes to the fore ?

*rubs chin in ponderance*

(0)(1)

Anonymous

I hope all of you get glandular fever. Jesus Christ.

(2)(4)

Scouser of Counsel

Good on him, I say.

(5)(3)

Anonymous

Wish I was black now

(2)(1)

Anonymous

What a pointless article in 2017. Black person gets job in city. How amazing! It’s actually very patronising to write articles like this Legal Cheek.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Yes, it’s what we’ve come to expect from Legal Cheek. Just awful. White writer pats black person on the back for becoming a trainee. Who would have thought a black man could achieve such an amazing achievement in 2017?!?!?

(1)(1)

Anonymous

I know. It’s unbelievable that Rare could be so patronising as having a ceremony that only celebrates black people’s achievements in 2017!!

(0)(0)

Anonymous

This is a total non-story, and as such is a perfect example of Legal Cheek articles these days.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

So much white privileged racist hate going on here. Unbelievable in 2017.

(0)(2)

Anonymous

?? Where’s the “racist hate” ??

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Very well done to this young man. However, it makes me somewhat sad to learn he chose Freshfields considering their very low retention rates (and poor culture) compared to the other 2.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Nice patronising article Katie King. Hope you’re proud.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

LC should stand for Legal Condescending

(1)(0)

Comments are closed.