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Potty-mouthed profession: Half of lawyers regularly swear at work, research finds

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24

F***!

New research has suggested that almost half of UK lawyers swear at work.

The findings reveal 42% of lawyers regularly use obscene language on the job, compared to just 36% of finance workers and 32% of retail staff.

In an industry where professionalism and personal judgement is imperative, are lawyers really effing and blinding around the office? Not wishing to be named, one City lawyer told Legal Cheek that the research has at least some truth to it. He said:

A frequent thing that happens is people mute conference calls to unleash a barrage of obscenities at the inanimate phone and then unmute to continue the discussion as normal

An in-house lawyer, again wishing to remain anonymous, told us that “a lot of the time when you hear someone swear it’s them announcing that they’ve received an email.” He continued:

If anyone ever bothers to ask ‘what’s wrong?’ when they hear a colleague shout ‘For f*ck sake!!!’ it’s more often than not met with ‘oh nothing… it’s just an email from the client’.

But, lawyers aren’t the most potty-mouthed profession. The study polled 2,000 adults, including 125 ‘legal industry’ employees, and found that the energy sector is home to the most foul-mouthed staff (65%). The pharmaceutical industry has the least (29%).

Elsewhere in the report, produced by Soap Supplier, 37% of respondents said they had been on the receiving end of bad language from their boss, with a whopping 71% of those claiming it happens on a regular basis. Thirty-five percent of those questioned said they had, on at least one occasion, sworn at their boss.

More generally, the survey suggests that males swear around 10 times per hour, while females will drop the F-bomb, or something similar, roughly eight times. Geographically, Wales and Greater London were named the sweariest regions (12 times per hour), and the South West and East Midlands the least (seven times per hour).

Sweariest industry sectors

Infographic via Soap Supplier

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24 Comments

Anonymous

Rubbish. Only half?

(14)(0)

Anonymous

F*** me, this article is a pile of s***.

C***.

(42)(2)

Anonymous

Best. Comment. Ever. Just spat my sandwich on the computer screen.

(4)(4)

Anonymous

Stop rating your own comments, son.

(6)(2)

Anonymous

Even if I did rate my own comments, you would still be the loser out of the two of us for being on legal cheek at 9:04pm. Get a lyfe fam.

(4)(4)

Anonymous

You will find the most amount of swearing in litigation and contentious departments.

The non-conten lawyers tend to have less to be vexed and swear about.

(20)(0)

Anonymous

Arrrree you f***ing kidding m8

(1)(3)

Anonymous

You obviously haven’t worked in “non-contentious ” – the most inappropriately named area of the profession.

(6)(4)

Anonymous

Have done. Mostly filled with beta cucks.

(7)(2)

Anonymous

F the F off you Fing C. I will F up all your S you C.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(1)

Anonymous

Someone get this small child a cookie or something… blood sugar is obviously too low.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

The members of the criminal bar have the filthiest f***ing mouths. I remember the first time, as a pupil, that I had to drop the C bomb in court while opening a case. I went so pink and my voice seemed so loud.

Now it’s all f*** f***etty f*** f*** f*** from the court to the robing room and everywhere in between.

(7)(0)

Jones Day Partner

That last sentence makes it sound like our office.

(1)(1)

Anonymous

HAHAHAHAHAHA OH MY GOD THIS GIMMICK JUST DOES NOT GET OLD

(2)(8)

In-house Paralegal

Can someone please explain this whole Jones Day Partner thing to me?

(1)(1)

Anonymous

Swearing is a fucking abhorrence, you khunts.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(3)(1)

Anonymous

No, it wasn’t “F my C”.

You misheard.

It’s “F ing C”

(1)(1)

Anonymous

No excuse for bad language, these people lack an adequate vocabulary!

(1)(2)

Anonymous

I used to swear terribly.

The turning point though was when my oldest child started to get old enough to understand words. I found that I carried forward the conscientious effort I made to not swear at home with me to work.

I am now of the crowd that tuts when someone unceremoniously bursts forth with a “oh for f***’s sake” on a Wednesday morning.

(1)(1)

Sir Geffroy De Joinville's 3 yo son

O how naughty

(0)(0)

Anonymous

I can assure you that if you tell an unidentified individual who telephones you at 3 A.M. in the morning (so as to threaten the life of your son – as he travels between his home & his school – which they identify for you), to ‘Feck Off, I will not money launder for you’ – The SRA will take that individual’s complaint seriously . . .

(0)(0)

Tom.

If you lack sufficient vocabulary in order to express yourself ? then swearing is an obvious inclusion of your daily conversations.

(0)(0)

Comments are closed.