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BPP student who fell victim to theft reunited with highlighted and tabbed company law textbook after public plea

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Her laptop is still missing, though

A law student whose rucksack was nicked has, thankfully, been reunited with the one item inside she was particularly keen to recover: her company law textbook.

Polly Dixon, who is studying for her Legal Practice Course (LPC) at BPP in Cambridge, returned to her car one morning to find her rucksack missing. Inside was a laptop, bank cards, her purse, several books and university notes. Speaking to a local newspaper in the wake of the theft, Dixon explained that while the laptop is “obviously worth the most money”, it’s her Company Law Handbook she was particularly keen to get back. She told Halstead Gazette:

“It’s the books that are most important because they are highlighted and tabbed which has taken around three months to accumulate together. I’m just angry really.”

Anyone who has mastered the art of law book tabbing will share in University of Hertfordshire graduate Dixon’s frustration — but it’s also worth noting the book is far from cheap. The newest edition is £160.

Despite her understandable anger, Dixon remained hopeful that the thief may have dumped the rucksack once they discovered lots of paper and books inside. And, thankfully, that seems to have been what’s happened. Halstead Gazette reports: “[Dixon] has since recovered the books after her bag was found dumped in the River Colne in Halstead at the weekend.”

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Her laptop is, sadly, still missing.

Dixon is not the first BPP law student to fall victim to a law work-related theft. A Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) student hit headlines when she confronted two men trying to steal her £1,300 laptop from the law library, which contained her university work. Thankfully, Greta Hedley-Miller’s precious computer was saved after she and some fellow law students were able to pin the perpetrator to the ground. “The adrenaline kicked in,” she said.


UPDATE: 1:15pm Tuesday 6 February

We have been told by Dixon that a young man has handed himself into police with her laptop. “He has written a letter of apology and the police are working towards a community order for him,” she said.

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25 Comments

Anonymous

Surely mummy and daddy can pay

(6)(52)

Anonymous

Thank you for your comment, unfortunately and contrary to popular belief, not all law students come from privileged backgrounds. I have worked extremely hard having 3 part time jobs at the same time throughout my studies in order to fund myself and I think many others would say the same.
It is also clear that you have not read the article thoroughly as it clearly states that the most important thing is the notes which have taken a lot of time to accumulate not the cost of the stolen goods.
You cannot put a price on hard work.

(82)(3)

Counsel

I do: £300.00 an hour, plus V.A.T.!

(39)(2)

London QC

That’s cheap, do you practice from a broom cupboard in Darlington?

(29)(1)

Legna & Lived

peasant salary Mr Counsel, I wouldn’t be publishing that if I was in your cheap, old fashioned shoes.

(3)(1)

Anonymous

U mad bro

(5)(2)

Johnny Sumption

The last time i was counsel I charged a fee which was long as a telephone number

(3)(0)

Anonymous

Shame she’s still a victim of the true crime i.e. going to BPP

(44)(6)

Anonymous

This happened to me last year, I am law student. The police did not even give some of my stuff back, but they had mentioned it in the phone call to me.!!

(3)(1)

Anonymous

I left a bag of books on the bus. Thought they were gone for good (or had been detonated as suspicious package), only to be contacted by a total stranger who had found them and gone to the trouble of contacting me and arranging to get them back to me. Only slightly nervous to be going to meet a complete stranger at their house in a part of London I didn’t know to get them back. They were lovely, and even gave me a cup of tea. Faith in humanity restored.

(12)(0)

Anonymous

If the bag was dumped in the River Colne, wasn’t the book ruined?

(9)(0)

Anonymous

I only ever tabbed the statute book the night before the exam.

(5)(0)

Shady Fail

This is truly a travesty, and I hope the perp, a certain senile unelected judge who earns so little she can’t even afford her own books, is brought to justice

(1)(1)

Da Feef

I iz lahk well soz innit?

(0)(1)

Anonymous

It seems that the person who took the bag and laptop has a conscience and actually bought the stuff back!! I am surprised and happy for the student.

Good on the person for bringing it back. It seems they must be quite desperate / going through tough times. I hope they get the help they need.

(8)(1)

Anonymous

The article says they kept the laptop. Probably less due to a conscience and more because they can sell that in some back alley whereas the market for law text books is somewhat smaller.

(1)(4)

Anonymous

The update at the bottom of the article states that the person handed themself in at the police station along with the laptop.

(6)(0)

Anonymous

Looks like you were vindicated… the offending party handed in the laptop and gave himself up. I would have loved to see the expression on the desk sergeant’s face when he turned up…

(4)(0)

Anonymous

I don’t think Polly Dixon should worry too much. She has shown the ability to work hard and has made things work. She has constructed an appeal for her textbook and she got it.

The laptop is a bit of a shame. However, there are ways to crowdsource new things like this. Women (and men) from Venezuela are pretty hot on it. Online webcam chatrooms are really growing. The success of the individual will depend on their looks and how prude they are, but the option remains.

(6)(8)

Anonymous

you are a twisted individual

(1)(0)

Anonymous

The world is a twisted place. I fit in well.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(1)(0)

Fuck BPP

BPP is fucking shite

(3)(4)

Anonymous

“The police are working towards a community order for him” So when do the police chose, or even suggest, a sentence? If the CPS decide to prosecute, it is up to the court to determine the appropriate sentence. The police should stick to investigating.
They might decide to caution the offender as he has returned the laptop when presumably he would not have been identified as the thief, however that has nothing to do with community orders.

(4)(0)

Da Feef

I iz lahk, well speshul, innit?

(0)(0)

Comments are closed.

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