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Future pupil barrister launches YouTube channel explaining laws in 60 seconds

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His first quick-fire clip is on stop and search

Christian Weaver

A budding barrister has come up with a clever way of helping people understand their rights — through the medium of vlogging.

Christian Weaver, a Nottingham Law School Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) grad, has launched a YouTube channel with the aim of explaining various laws in under one minute.

In the first quick-fire clip, the 24-year-old provides a brief overview of the UK laws relating to stop and search, including the powers the police have and what action you can take if you’re stopped. The video was first uploaded to Weaver’s YouTube channel and subsequently shared with his 1,000 followers on Twitter. It has already racked up over 1,500 views.

Speaking to Legal Cheek, Weaver explained his motivation behind the channel:

“Although people understand the importance of the law, very few people take the time to become knowledgeable in it — often deeming it too difficult or a time-consuming task. My #TheLawin60Seconds project identifies legal matters that relate to ordinary people and helps explain their rights in very simple terms. I hope my videos will be an educational resource — they only last 60 seconds so everyone should have the time to view them.”

Weaver hopes to post regular content to his channel. Future episodes will touch on a range of issues, including the Grenfell Tower tragedy and whether shops can refuse to give consumers a refund.

Weaver completed his LLB at Nottingham Law School and stayed on after graduating in 2015 to complete the BPTC. Since then, the aspiring barrister has volunteered for various legal charities including human rights organisation Liberty.

The 2018 Legal Cheek BPTC Most List

The 24 year-old is currently the UK’s youth delegate for the Council of Europe and works as a trainee caseworker for legal charity INQUEST. Weaver confirmed to Legal Cheek that he will be commencing pupillage at a human rights set later next year.

This isn’t, however, the first time we have seen a law student turn to YouTube to share their wisdom.

Earlier this year, Legal Cheek reported on Ludo Lugnani, a Univesity of York LLB-er who runs a channel called The Business Update. Ideal pre-training contract interview viewing, Lugnani posts short video clips updating his followers on the latest commercial awareness issues. And it’s not just law students taking to YouTube either. Irwin Mitchell solicitor Chrissie Wolfe shares, among other things, her top training contract tips on her channel, Law and Broader.

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41 Comments

Anonymous

Good idea. I’ve always thought that legal basics should be part of a mandatory school civics course. But I understand the pressures on school timetables, so this sort of initiative can help fill the gap.

(42)(1)

Irish Viking

Do you SERIOUSLY think the “establishment” wants school leavers to know their rights?

“They” want good obedient sheep who don’t question the crimes and subterfuge THEY get away with everyday and have to say, to that end, that YOUR RIGHTS are what YOU SAY they are, not what some bureaucrat ALLOWS you. That said, your rights STOP where mine start. In simple terms;

Luke 6:31 New International Version (NIV)

31 “Do to others as you would have them do to you”.. That is the ONLY LAW we need and it isn’t man made.

Their “legal” system is mired in gobbledegook and pseudo Latin legalese, designed to confuse and wrong turn you unless you are in THEIR “club” then they stack the game by telling you “Ignorance of the law is no defence”.

Your lawyer doesn’t work for YOU (even though you pay him) he is an officer of the COURT, and thus his FIRST LOYALTY is to the geriatric crone posing as a “judge” and he does WHATEVER the “judge” ORDERS him to do. If he doesn’t he gets disbarred.

Courts, fair? ONLY one with a Jury in it, all others are kangaroo courts with the “state” prosecuting you in a “state run” building (paid for by YOU the sheep of course” and WHO does that “judge” work for? THE STATE..So THAT is going to be fair outcome isn’t it?

I applaud this young lad but if he has the rocks to buck the system and stand up for RIGHT (not law) then he has a bright future.

(2)(13)

Anonymous

Your first language appears to be Nonsense – at least you’re fluent in it 😂

(12)(0)

Anonymous

Irish Viking, allow me to address your concluding paragraph. It seems very well that you are completely blinded with hatred towards the “STATE”, and strive to break away ideologically from the intangible shackles you, and the rest of all of us….. are bound to.

Yet it is this mindset that ironically works against you, and is something the “Establishment” have dealt with for thousands of years.

You expressly mention in the last sentence that, “he has a bright future” if he has “the rocks” to “buck the system”, although this is an example of your indoctrinated psychology. You are missing the point; the only way to maximise your future’s potential, is to PLAY the system. Be Machiavellian. Appear to the needs of the establishment, get cosy with them, only then will you be given access to a future full off potential.

This is merely not possible to do when one strives for drastic change; hatred will get you nowhere, Viking’s, and Irish ones in particular, foresee the problems and consequences that could arise, be valiant and brave whilst also conveying subtly and timidness, only to seize the opportunity to make a ‘bright future’.

Ps, I think you’ll find that I am the one who specialises in “waffle”.
F.J.H

(1)(0)

Typical LC commentator

What is right? What is law? When I see some obese pensioner on benefits walking along with a waffle in his hand and I’m hungry, do I not have the right to take the waffle? Does not the absence of people in his life that might help him in this situation prove his moral decrepitude and hence the tightness of him losing the waffle?

I attempted to present this argument not only at the crown court but also at the court of appeals. It was rejected, and so I am now applying for leave to appeal to the Supreme Court and if that fails to the European court.

(0)(0)

The Rt. Hon. The Lord Wafflemeister of Harley Close Council Bungalows of Rochdale LLB (Oxo), K(f)C, (Pnt)Phil, MT, MT, MT.

I think you’ve lost your waffle, mate!

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Thanks. Have £2.50 and a bacon buttie for the pro bobo advice.

Anonymous

I’d offer a carrot, and it isn’t worth that!

Anonymous

I agree.

To use one example – I think it is amazing the skewed views many young people have of the employment relationship. Working with young people, their perception of the employer-employee relationship tends to be either the idea that you are some sort of serf/glorified slave or on the other hand that the employer owes you everything in the world.

Very little idea of basic employment rights and obligations between employer and employee. This should be taught in school in about 1 week.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Very good. Seems an affable chap.

(25)(0)

JD Equity Partner, Head of Disputes

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(1)

Anonymous

Let’s hope he never gets the law wrong if people rely on it.

(10)(3)

Anonymous

Yes, as per every other legal professional…

(24)(2)

Anonymous

Yes, except legal professionals at least have indemnity insurance.

(13)(0)

Anonymous

And are legally qualified to give advice.

It’s a nice idea. He just needs to add a little disclaimer that this not legal advice and should not be relied upon as such.

(18)(0)

Anonymous

10.06 is clearly another student.

(2)(3)

Anonymous

12.12 clearly a pr*ck

(5)(2)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Has he secured pupillage? Or is he a future pupil barrister in the same way my grandmother could be..

(26)(4)

NQ

What’s the NQ rate at Goldberg Glusker these days? Really wanna work for them.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

5m Thai Baht

(4)(1)

Anonymous

500m Vietnamese Dong, plus binary bonus.

(2)(0)

JDP

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

1 Satoshi

(0)(0)

Anonymous

“Weaver confirmed to Legal Cheek that he will be commencing pupillage at a human rights set later next year.”

He has secured it.

(12)(0)

Anonymous

‘Human rights sets’ dont exist.

(3)(3)

Anonymous

Good idea. General legal advice for free on an easily accessible platform makes sense. Good luck to him in the future.

(5)(0)

Anonymous

Reckon he would do one shirtless (or naked) for charity?

(1)(1)

Sally from Accounts

I certainly hope so.

(1)(1)

Chelsea the Legal Assistant

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Good idea and seems like a really bright and lovely chap but agree with the above comment about having a disclaimer, 60 second snapshots are brilliant and gets the basics out there for people who want to know about the law but don’t understand the language in a Blackstone’s book. However there are times where police may stop you and ask you your name (cases which aren’t simply a stop and account) for example if they were carrying out a report for summons for an offence or issuing a ticket, at which point failure to provide your name and a verifiable address would likely mean you get arrested for an offence and is highlighted in s24 (5) (a) and (b) of PACE as a necessity for arrest. Only after providing your name can you walk away as you have removed that ground for arrest and constable has the option to carry on the report for summons or issue a PND. If you decide to walk away without providing your name and address and have been stopped for or on suspicion of committing an criminal offence you’re quite likely to end up at the police station for whatever offence you were stopped for and obstructing a constable. Same with a stop and search, no need to provide details unless something is found on you that you shouldn’t have such as some drugs, people get confused that at this point if you don’t you’ll end up at a station so constables can verify your name and when you’re detained for a stop and search you cannot simply walk away, you don’t have to talk to the constable but you can’t walk away and many people get confused between a stop and account, a stop for an offence and a stop and search and though these videos are impressive without a disclaimer (to say that it isn’t advice and the law is complex) people could see them as legal advice whereas all he is providing is information, not telling someone what to do or how to act and could lead to unecessary civil claims.

(8)(0)

Anonymous

Say, in theory, a police officer stops you and you have something on your person that you really do not want them to discover. What do you do?

(1)(2)

Dr Frankenstein

You ask the police officer to wait 60 seconds while you watch his video.

(11)(0)

Cheese it & Scarper

Point at something down the street and shout anxiously “Did you see that, that guy there in the blue top it looked like he had a gun” then run like hell in the OPPOSITE direction!

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Great work. Encouraging those inner city yobos to give the police an even harder time

(12)(9)

Rastas 4 Peace

Aight? Course it is Bra..

(0)(0)

Bibi Ruqayya

Is there is any scholarship for BPTC , beacuse most of the students like me master graduate want to do it but beacuse of the expensives the leave there choice,

(1)(3)

Anonymous

Lolzies.

(0)(1)

Anonymous

Lollipops

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Learn to speak English and structure sentences grammatically correct, first.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

and structure sentences which are grammatically correct first.

(1)(0)

Comments are closed.

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