Advice

‘I have training contract offers from Slaughter and May, Clifford Chance, Latham & Watkins and White & Case — which one do I accept?’

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Magic circle versus US megafirms

In the latest instalment of our Career Conundrums series, one soon-to-be trainee City lawyer finds himself in the enviable position of having four training contract offers on the table — but which one should he accept?

I am currently sitting on a TC offer from Slaughter and May, Clifford Chance, Latham & Watkins and White & Case. I know the least about Slaughter and May as I’ve not been on a vacation scheme at the firm. I understand that they are often seen as very prestigious and have one of the top corporate practices in the UK. I am very interested in corporate and finance, with a partial leaning towards finance practices. Areas like debt capital markets, leveraged finance and private equity interest me. However, I would like the option of sitting in an international arbitration seat as well.

It might be silly but after reading a lot of the Legal Cheek comments, there seems to be a high regard for certain US firms like Latham & Watkins and Kirkland & Ellis, which is something I’ve never encountered before. This isn’t because they don’t market as heavily on campus, but because I always had the impression that they just did not get the same frequency of top, headlining deals in the UK. Furthermore, some firms like Kirkland appear much smaller and more like a foreign outpost. This last comment probably applies more to smaller US firms like Sullivan & Cromwell and Skadden.

I’d definitely like to hear more about why certain firms like Kirkland, Skadden and Latham are so well regarded by Legal Cheek readers when firms like White & Case, in the UK, seem to be up there as well in a host of metrics, but has a markedly lower standing among readers. Additionally, my interest in larger magic circle firms like Clifford Chance was because of the firm’s finance and corporate practice, numerous Tier 1 rankings and leading partners. Perhaps I’m misguided in putting too much premium on these factors.

Lastly, it seems a lot of readers are saying that US firms have worse progression prospects. This was totally contrary to my initial impressions since partnership at magic circle firms seem to take, on average, 10 years or more. Whilst US firms have multiple examples of more associates being made partner, relative to the number of associates. Am I mistaken?

I’d be great if readers could give me their advice!

If you have a career conundrum, email us at careers@legalcheek.com.

150 Comments

Anonymous

Clifford Chance or Slaughter and May. English firms still give the best training. Between those two, it depends how international you want your career to be.

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

Anonymous

Yawn. Same old same old.

Anonymous

agreed comrade

smash the patriarchy

OCCUPY LEGAL CHEEK

Anonymous

Dan is that you?

Anonymous

There’s only one choice: Slaughters. If you want to crank the handle on the same old bank side work then go somewhere else. If you want the broadest based diet of financing work on the much more interesting borrower side in a truly meritocratic culture, with the fastest partnership track, Slaughter and May is for you.

Anonymous

Slaughter and May is an octopus

Anonymous

Australians are extremely uncouth and Latham hires many of them – avoid.

Anonymous

Dechart

Anonymous

ROFL, avoid

Anonymous

Deckhair

Anonymous

Decathlon

Colonel Sanders

Deshart

Anonymous

Distinctively Dickert

Anonymous

Dongert

Anonymous

Dongle

Anonymous

Declan

Anonymous

DePaul

Anonymous

Descartes

Anonymous

Jones Day.

JD Partner

I’d need to know measurements and bedroom preferences first.

Chloe

22, blonde, size 8, wees a little when excited.

JD Partner

IN

Freshfields associate

Is that you Chloe?

Anonymous

Lol such a sweatshop

JD Partner

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

JD Managing Partner

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

Anonymous

sweatshop that pays 105k? surely sweatshop would imply intense work with low wage?

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

JD P4rtner

It’s not the work that makes you sweat…

Canary Wharf

Training contract at CC and then go to a US firm. You’ll be able to negotiate substantially better NQ pay on joining and benefit from a more structured training programme.

You’ll also have more fellow trainees to grab a drink with at CC due to a larger intake.

Anonymous

Is this true?

Anonymous

You don’t negotiate associate pay. There are 30 MC applicants for each NQ position at a US firm and you’ll get what you’re given. Only at a more senior level with a client base or reputation can you negotiate.

Anonymous

You’re deluded to think you can just walk into a US firm from CC at NQ level. You may get lots of calls for a first round interview from recruiters, but that will be you and 30 other Magic Circle Trainees. Also you don’t negotiate pay, when there are that many NQs wanting the job.

uslaw

I trained at an MC firm and moved to a US firm on qualification to do commercial disputes. On balance, I think training at the MC is a safe bet (name recognition; lots of seats etc.) However as an associate, my current firm is, in my opinion, a much better option – much better pay, better junior level work, no tedious investigations, far less tedious bureaucracy.

However, it’s difficult to make the move from an MC to a good US firm, particularly in a popular area like disputes at a junior level (my firm interviewed at least 20 MC trainees). I got lucky.

A lot of MC trainees with 2.1s from less than stellar universities think they’ll be able to walk into Latham on qualification (or as a junior associate), but the reality is pretty different. US firms tend to be very picky.

Anonymous

Are you likely to be able to move to one if you have an Oxbridge first?

Anonymous

Low chance only poly tech uni’s

Anonymous

lol another MC Trainee starting their career at a place they don’t want to stay at past qualification…if you have the chance to start at a US firm, and want to be there at NQ, take it

Disgruntled magic circle trainee

Loo9oooooool don’t be so sure. Clifford chance is a slaughter house the hours are ridiculous. Besides Nq positions at top tier firms like Latham aren’t so readily available especially considering you will be competing with a host of other magic circle and midsized firm’s trainees who are looking to move upon qualification. The training at British firm’s is better but I would definitely choose Slaughter’s I have friends at CC and they all hate it, honestly in terms of culture/work life balance Freshfields, Linklaters and CC are by far the worst magic circles to start your career in. Finally, just because you get lots of offers through the door doesn’t necessarily mean your actually good you may just be good at like a Watson Glaser (re Clifford chance) or just have good grades (re slaughter’s). I know a girl who trained at CC got 3 training contract offers but couldn’t get a single offer upon qualification.

In the words, of rapper *Kendrick Lamar* be humble you got a way’s to go .

Anonymous

You OK bro?

Lay off the powder next time.

Anonymous

Your a loser

Anonymous

Oh look, another fictitious career conondrum.

Anonymous

Don’t think so – same question is being asked on the Student Room forum

Sherlock Holmes

Well that settles it then. It’s legit. Case closed.

Anonymous

People actually go on that site?

Anonymous

They could at least write a fake email and screenshot that to make these ‘conundrums’ more believable

Anonymous

Quite a tough choice – I’d say choose either Slaughters or Latham based on your fit with the firm.

Anonymous

Agree with this. I’ll get abuse for this but CC just isn’t as respected as the other MC firms. Slaughters upsides is training and prestige. Downside is lack of international opportunities. Latham upside is that it’s stronger in arbitration and a finance powerhouse as well as lots of international prospects. Downside is smaller intake, longer hours and less training.

If you think you can hack it by learning on the job then go for Latham. If you need all the hand holding then go for Slaughters. Bear in mind this also means that the quality of work trainees do tends to be worse at bigger firms as interesting work is usually done higher up the food chain. I’d go for Latham with your options.

Word on the grapevine is W&C trainees get abused like hell – not a nice place to be. And it’s less prestigious than Latham.

Boiler room

W&C is an utter sweatshop, no matter whether you’re a trainee or junior associate

Max

White & Case is a good shop and suffers because commenters on Legal Cheek are obsessed with US firms’ prestige in New York as opposed to trainee experience in London.

Having said that, what are you interested in? If finance or litigation, go Clifford; if M&A or niche advisory, go Slaughter; Latham for finance or corporate if you want more responsibility early on; White & Case for Private Equity or international arbitration.

Anonymous

oh also Latham for equity cap markets; W&C for debt cap markets and project finance

Anonymous

Fair summary, but don’t know why you’d go for PE at W&C at CC or Latham

Chambers Private Equity: Buyouts: High-End Capability
Band 1
Clifford Chance LLP
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
Latham & Watkins
Weil, Gotshal & Manges (London) LLP

Anonymous

more that W&C are still on a massive PE hiring spree so you can get NQ positions there easily, more so than CC/L&W afaik, but good point

Anonymous

Seconded – it’ll be harder to get a seat in a MC PE team than it would at W&C. The team at W&C is actually very good, it’s just relatively new so not that high up the rankings. As a recruiter, if I had a CV from a PE associate at W&C I know I could place that person anywhere.

Mel

Look I don’t think training with US firm’s is bad, just make sure you do lots of paralegal experience in different areas before you start your TC to accommodate for the lack of training

Anonymous

Since this ‘conundrum’ has more or less come up exactly as before, here’s my favourite comment ever on LC that appeared last time round:

“Try this.

Do not join either firm. Working in corporate law will suck the joy and humanity from you and leave you an empty husk of a person. Because you will practice law that contains virtually no human emotion or values at all you will become very, very boring and dead behind the eyes. People – even other lawyers – will edge away from you at social events if you tell them what you do. Over time you will become a social leper unless you invent a fictitious cover story, learn it well and stick to it. Living this dual existence is likely to make you mentally ill.

In the long-term you will have no friends and probably no marriage. You will however have a vulgar house (with leaded windows) in the home counties and on retirement you will receive a framed picture and a vote of thanks from the partners.”

Anonymous

This is delicious, 10/10.

Anonymous

This is definitely the best thing I ever saw on LC

James

If you are most interested in Corporate, go to Slaughter. Their high-end M&A practice is the best bar none, and other areas are good enough to qualify into if you decide on something else. High-end M&A is the last frontier for the US firms – they’re getting there, but not yet.

Anonymous

You might even get to carry papers for the best solicitor in the city https://www.slaughterandmay.com/who-we-are/partners/nigel-boardman/.

Anonymous

“Joined firm in 1973”

45 years later and still there. HARDCORE.

Anonymous

I think they should do a “Life on Mars” style series about the firm.

Can you imagine how debauched it must have been in 1973?

Anonymous

He was already there before my mum was born… The dude is a vampire

Anonymous

Is she a crackhead teenage mother or something?

Anonymous

He’s not even that bright. Went to Bristol so by definition second rate intellectually. But then again, he’s a corporate “lawyer” and just cobbles together boilerplate deals, and you don’t need to be clever to do that work.

Anonymous

Thanks for this nugget of wisdom, Gomer.

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

Anonymous

Fuck you

Nigel Boardman

Anytime

MindInRiot

Such an ignorant comment.

Anonymous

And you have done what, exactly?

Anonymous

Work for legal cheek and you can come up with this fictitious shite once a week….

Theresa has offered the Attorney General’s role, but I also have Trump on the line, whilst the ICC wants me as a judge.

Please help legal cheek – which one should I accept?

Anonymous

Lol made my day. Take the trump call, become a ICC judge and reject the Theresa job its too risky. Hope this helped.

Commercial barrister

If it was me, I’d go to Slaughters. Everyone I have met at that firm has been so impressive.

Anonymous

Hahahahahaha as if someone with TC offers from the top two and then a big US firm would be asking for advice from Legal Cheek readers

for fuck’s sake guys at least try and make it believable

Sweatshop Thread

List the biggest battery farms below

Anonymous

1. Duracell
2. Energizer

Anonymous

Distinctively Duracell

Anonymous

hahahaha

Anonymous

Panasonic batterys for the international flavour

Anonymous

Some thoughts on each:

1. If you haven’t experience Slaughters but all others, probably best to pick one of those. Slaughters is a great firm (prestige-wise), but not much more spectacular than other MC.

2. CC is standard Magic Circle, but with around 200 Trainees at any one time across both years. Great to have a big intake for social pre-LPC, but chances are you won’t even know all the Trainees at the firm, let alone the associates and Partners.. CC’s model is to hire loads at the bottom, so that when the high attrition occurs, they still have a solid number of people left. Lots leave, and partnership prospects at CC can be bleak and very opaque.

3. W&C is great firm again, probably not as prestigious as the magic circle or super-elite US (Latham/Kirkland/Cleary). I’ve heard mixed reviews of W&C Trainee life, they do work you hard there like other US/MC shops but ultimately don’t pay as high at Associate level. Very good travel opportunities, and mid-size intake so sociable. But, again, by far the least elite of your options and the offices aren’t great.

4. Latham is obviously Latham — incredibly global and effectively a magic circle firm in London (but with a US history). Smaller teams, so trainees treated as Junior Associates. Excellent exposures to deals. More travel opportunity with actual work, but maybe less travel opportunity with secondments. Trainees tend to be older, but there are 25 of them. If money is a big thing on your mind, then Latham obv wins (£146k base minus bonus when you qualify, and they have good retention rates). London quite a big hub for them, with the chairman based in London, so don’t worry bout being a satellite office.

Also, take into account where YOU liked on your vac scheme.

I would take Latham now, its super-elite, big in London now, and probably a clever place to be going forward.

Anonymous

How does Shearman compare to Latham and/or W+C? The pay is obviously not at Latham’s level but is the work and training any good?

Shearman Trainee

Training is generally better than Latham/W&C (lots of it and decent quality) but i would pick Latham over Shearman, and Shearman over W&C.

Barrister Dan Bilzerian

‘Areas like debt capital markets, leveraged finance and private equity interest me’

You must be a hit at parties…

Anonymous

or just a liar

Anonymous

Latham is to Slaughter’s what Kirkland is to Freshfields. Aspiring, but no cigar.

Anonymous

are you ok

Anonymous

Yes

MJ

Annie?

Anonymous

Fred?

Anonymous

George?

Anonymous

Yi-Jin?

Anonymous

Is Skadden London that much smaller than the other London offices of US firms?

Anonymous

Wat

Anonymous

No

Anonymous

LC commentators are obsessed with US law firms and equally obsessed with doing down the magic circle so take the comments here with a pinch of salt.

First of all I would say that there is not a huge gap in the prestige of these firms (except perhaps W&C) so that’s not really a factor.

However, my opinion is that the pay is not really a factor at trainee level. Trainees all get paid roughly the same and if you care about NQ pay you can move when the time comes. People who make out that it is very hard to move from the magic circle to elite US firms are simply wrong, as every single one of my friends who started at a magic circle firm and wanted to move at a US firm has been able to do that without any problems.

On the other hand, there is quite a big downside to choosing the US firms which other commentators ignore – yes they are on par with the magic circle in certain practice areas (mainly transactional ones) but certainly not all. For example, if you had your eye on more advisory areas down the line (e.g. IP, tax, pensions, financial regulation etc.) then simply none of the US firms are anywhere near the magic circle in these areas. It’s simply a fact, look it up on Chambers. To the extent people do this sort of advisory work in US firms, it is more in a “support” role than as a standalone practice.

Doing a training contract at Slaughters or CC would allow you to keep your options open to a much greater extent. If you discover you like transactional work and you are any good, you can move to a US firm if you want and that is fine. If you discover you like advisory work, then you wouldn’t have had the same opportunities to discover that at US firms. Whether you pick Slaughters or CC is up to you depending on whether you want to be in a smaller more UK focussed firm or a larger more international one. For what its worth, judging by people I know Slaugthers offers a bit of a better work life balance than CC.

Anonymous

Buthurt

Anonymous

Dorsey any day.

Dorsey Always Ahead

What’s the NQ pay? Does it exceed the Cravath scale?

Dorsey

We’re always ahead and far, far exceed Cravath.

DORSEY

The Myth of Minneapolis, the Powerhouse of the Prairies, the Mighty Minnesotans.

Anonymous

You have a training contract offer from Latham & you’re seriously considering other offers?! You don’t need advice – you need a good backhand.

Destitute

I think in the current market of uncertain globalisation, get in to an international arbitration seat. A (presumably) British person in an international firm may get you further in the long-term than and an (presumably) English kid in an English firm? How long will English Law be a sought after given its handling of Laws post Brexit (other than a haven to get divorced in)?

Dickbert

Interesting observation.

Anonymous

All rankings are imperfect but best view of actual market position comes from Chambers. Take a look at Chambers rankings for these firms and you will have your answer.

Anonymous

As someone that works in recruitment I would definitely say for finance you will get the training in the magic circle firms. With Clifford Chance they also have an academy, so if you learn well in a classroom setting then I would advise CC.

In terms of American firms they love magic circle firms as they respect the training. US firms also pay a lot more so that is something you can consider when you qualify.

Finally, as someone already mentioned CC have a big intake and one thing you need to know about law is that networking a big part of the job so having friends in the sector is a huge plus

Anonymous

can you speak proper English though?

Anonymous

Why do you think he/she is in recruitment not law?

Anonymous

savage

Anonymous

I question the effectiveness of these ‘give me advice’ articles.

The comments are either:

(i) people name-calling (its not even criticism at this point) other firms, offering no constructive insights into a chosen firms strengths; and
(ii) people arguing about MC prestige vs. US big money

The only conclusion to draw from these comments is that it is all subjective. You have people who don’t like certain firms for god knows what reason, so name calls them (I often think its because they did a vac scheme and got rejected). You have people who prioritise ‘prestige’ over salary, and vice versa.

The truth is, just pick which ever one you enjoyed most and your gut is telling you to go with. Don’t listen to the idiots on here. They are not associates at these firms, they are far too busy to be trolling LC. You are seeking advice from a bunch of sour imbeciles, the ‘reject pile’ if you will.

Go with your gut.

Good luck.

Anonymous

Cheers Geoff.

Cheers Geoff

He seems to have a problem with over analysing LC articles but its only a knock and he should be able to carry on.

Andy Townsend

If anything, his analysis was probably too good.

Michael Owen

The truth is, if he accepts a training contract he could go on to be a trainee.

Andy Gray

Ohhhhhhh you beautyyy!!!! What a comment son, what a comment.

Anonymous

Well, that was unexpected. Top class. LC comments section at its finest.

your Gut

Latham

Your genitals

Jones Day

US 1PQE

People need to realise that it isn’t as simple as ‘going to a MC firm then moving to a top US firm after qualification’ – it’s bloody difficult to do and there will be 20+ other top trainees wanting to do the same thing.

It’s simple: if you want to be at a top US firm, train there.If you aren’t sure / want the security of MC, do that.But do not do the latter if you are pretty sure you’ll want to move to a Latham or Kirkland etc after qualifying because the reality is that it is incredibly tough to do.

Anonymous

totally agree. If (say) 20% of Magic Circle NQs are looking in the market at qualification (at least because they are intrigued and thus interviewing around), then of around 400 MC NQs each years, thats around 80 people in competition for probably only a handful of spaces (especially considering now these firms have their own trainees). That includes competition from other elite US firms, and Top City firms on top of the 80. That also excludes how many MC 1PQE/2PQE want to move as they realise they are doing the same work for a LOT less money.

Anonymous

Im not saying everyone wants to move, far from it, but there are a lot that do and not a proportionate number of positions around at the top US firms

Anonymous

Only the rejects want to move. The stars are accommodated with qualification in sought after departments of their choice. They are lavished with dinners and lunches by partners.

Anonymous

Jesus..they are exactly the ones who do move. only the best get the elite US offers…

Anonymous

No. The good enough get elite offers. The trainees seconded to competitive destinations always stay.

Anonymous

? very odd point of view

Anonymous

Imagine a £30-50 lunch being enough to dissuade you from an additional 40K in salary.

MC trained NQ, now at US firm

That’s exactly spot on. Same hours (actually in my case less) than NQs in the same department where I got an offer, nice team and 30k more than the ridiculous binary bonus some MC firms have.

If people consider themselves to be charities, or being too attached to the firm they trained, then so be it. But not matter how much partner may want you there, they run a business, so they would not hesitate to say ‘bye bye’ to you if things started to go south.

Anonymous

Were you seconded to New York?

MC trained NQ, now at US firm

Nope. Neither abroad, nor with a client.

Anonymous

CC – best for training, good international opportunities (best in MC), top-tier corporate and finance teams.

L&W – best for money, has strong finance and PE practices, and the kudos of working for one of the fastest-growing firms in the City and world.

W&C – best for diversity and guaranteed international secondment opportunities. Good finance shop.

Slaughters – best M&A outfit in the City. Decisive factor is the distinctive culture – only you can know if it’s for you.

Interesting to note that both W&C and L&W strongest practices are built from ex-CC’ers.

Anonymous

Do what your heart desires if this is not a load of bs.

Anonymous

Thoughts on Dorsey and pay?

Dorsey & (I bring my Benz) With Me

£180k NQ, £350k at 2PQE.

Anonymous

Lathams all day long if you want to get ahead of the rest on qualification. You will have better options than training at a MC. Put the hours in now a reap the career advancement rewards later.

Money above happiness

Latham for the money

Those Zone 1 apartments aren’t gonna pay for themselves

Anonymous

Decisions decisions decisions. You poor little lamb. Didn’t you know one of the best attributes a lawyer can have is decisiveness.

Sixth Former who wants to be a solicitor.

Out of the blue question here.

Does anyone know how good the commercial litigation department is at Latham & Watkins?

Horsecock

You’ve spelt it wrong you dildo, it Lathem & Wetkins.

Anonymous

All major global firms will have a corporate and finance focus. Litigation will always be an additional service they provide. There are some exceptions like HSF that has an incredible disputes team, and I hear Hogan Lovells has a good disputes capacity too but I have never dealt with them.

LW London has a disputes team (civil lit, regulatory/investigations, arbitrations) team that services their incredibly envious client list, so the work will be interesting and challenging. If they cock up too often the clients are likely to ditch the whole firm, but we haven’t heard of that too often so obviously they do a decent enough job.

However, if in the future you’re lucky enough to interview at LW and all you talk about is litigation, know that you would be rambling on about less than 25%, if even that, of the office’s billables. You’re better off learning about the firm’s clients, the various deals they’ve helped them on and general commercial areas of expertise.

Anonymous

Wherever you go, you’ll probably end up in corporate, finance or maybe funds. Most MC and US trainees qualify into those areas. Probably easier to get advisory seats during a TC at a US firm due to less competition, probably less chance at retention as NQ but you can easily lateral for that.

Not easy to move from MC to US. Lies from future MC trainees or students who have done some MC work experience and been rejected from US. You’re most likely to get the people you want from other US firms, it’s not hard, it’s just having the relevant experience at the right level. An NQ in a US firm will be doing trainee level work, as they will be doing also at MC firms, but will also be doing 3-5 PQE work. On a deal with a MC firm now, there are 2 of us actively on it, and about 10 of them.

Big trainee cohorts don’t matter as you will be working in departmental and team silos and you will be working so many hours you won’t see each other. And big cohorts always clique, you won’t know more than 10 trainees very well.

If straight out of uni, MC firms are a safer option with marginally better hours, probably a better chance of not getting disturbed on holiday, and you’re less visible to partners and the wider firm so you can cock up in obscurity and still get taken on because they need bodies. It is true that the trainee salaries are the same – actually better at this point – in the MC. How long you stay in private practice is also an unknown. If you’re in an area with crappy exits then you’ll probably be in for the longer haul.

Confused offer holder

Linklaters or CC?

Anonymous

Links. CC can barely maintain a profit margin of 40%. Links is around 46-47% profitability which is around American elite law firm level.

High profitability usually involves insane amounts of work for the best clients in the world, so Links on the CV will put you on a different tier when you inevitably leave. You will still have the same plethora of areas to train/qualify into.

The other consideration is location: CC is Canary Wharf life and Links is Moorgate. You’re going to be working insane hours in both options so you want to live close by. If you have additional financial support on top of what you’ll be earning as a trainee then Moorgate/Shoreditch/ Old Street area could be pretty awesome. Otherwise, there’s a lot of amazing new builds in the Canning Town/Docklands/Canary Wharf/Greenwich Peninsula areas that put you at CC’s front door in less than 15 mins by DLR or Jubilee Line that are considerably more affordable.

Anonymous

Ah yes, profit margins are the most important thing to a trainee after all! Surely not culture, fit, salary, rankings, etc.

Confused offer holder

Are Links and CC even that different culturally?

Anonymous

You should be able to tell if you sat at both Vac Schemes? But yes, they most definitely are.

Confused offer holder

I did direct TC applications, hence the confusion

Anonymous

What did you do in your summer then? Flip a coin. They’re both going to give you an arsenal of things to say as to why the firm is better than the other.

Confused offer holder

I know they’re pretty different in terms of the work they do, but they both seem much of the same when it comes to working environment. And I’m late to the whole law thing, vac schemes weren’t really an option for me

Anonymous

Trainee Salary? Negligible difference. NQ salary may differ a little more but the MC will remain roughly within 10-15% of each other, with any major differences made up within a year or two.

Culture/fit? Loads of hard working corporate types with a trainee intake of circa 100 per year. You will be a small fish in a big pond. You’ll find someone you like and a lot of people you don’t. It’s all a melting pot into the MC personality by the time qualification rolls around anyways.

Rankings? Links has just as many, if not more, Tier 1 rankings on the various listings than CC with ~33% less lawyers AND offices around the world. And again, higher profitability which is testament to the high fees they charge for the complex work. These add to a better name to have on CV. Not saying that having CC would drastically reduce career mobility on NQ – few years PQE, but right now Links is viewed as slightly more prestigious.

But again, I honestly think location should play ONE of the main factors between the two. Living in London on anything less than £50k a year is a real bore, and finding comfortable and convenient accommodation for 2 years of slaving away for 12+ hours a day non-stop is going to be a real pain in the ass. It was for me.

Anonymous

Nice try.

1. Linklaters pays less NQ salary
2. Has a higher intake (110)
3. Less Chamber Band 1 Rankings and similar Legal 500 Tier 1 Rankings (CC is better in PE, Links is better in M&A)
4. MORE lawyers in the UK compared to CC (900+ vs 700+)
5. Less profitable in the UK (check the annual reports)

And… pretty much the same brand / prestige as Clifford Chance. Not sure why you are so confident in framing your opinion as fact.

Linklaters must also be Tier 1 in marketing.

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