News

First ever law scholarship for STEM students unveiled

By on
15

STEM Future Lawyers joins forces with BPP University Law School to launch GDL scholarship for science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) students

The first ever scholarship for science students interested in pursuing a career in the law has been announced.

STEM Future Lawyers, the law careers network for science, technology, engineering and maths students, has joined forces with BPP University Law School to offer the award.

It will see £5,000 granted toward the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) fees of one STEM Future Lawyers member. The award may also be shared between two students, who would receive £2,500 each. You can sign up to STEM Future Lawyers, which is a Legal Cheek sister site, here.

The scholarship is open to all STEM students and graduates interested in a career in the law. It is valid for three years, enabling undergraduates who have not yet completed their courses to apply.

BPP University’s head of development (innovation technology), Adam Curphey, will be formally announcing the scholarship at STEM Future Lawyers’ annual law fair and panel discussion this evening at LexisNexis in London, featuring solicitors, trainees and graduate recruitment teams from Allen & Overy, Bristows, Clifford Chance, Pinsent Masons, Reed Smith, Bird & Bird, CMS, Freshfields, Mayer Brown, Osborne Clarke and Travers Smith.

A panel of legal education experts, including Curphey and BPP Law School dean Andrew Chadwick, will assess the applicants, with the successful scholar announced in the New Year.

Chadwick said:

“As a law school we are extremely excited about this new initiative. STEM graduates who convert to a career in law bring a valuable perspective to the talent recruitment mix for graduate employers. The legal profession benefits from talent with a diverse educational background and life experience. STEM graduates are a valuable asset to firms in improving the delivery of legal services especially as technology is increasingly integrated into the profession. BPP are committed to developing STEM talent further through additional Legal Technology training on our LPC, helping them to apply their expertise to spot innovation opportunities and drive change in the workplace. We look forward to the first intake starting in September 2019.”

Alex Aldridge, the founder of STEM Future Lawyers and Legal Cheek, said:

“We are delighted to join forces with BPP University Law School to create this scholarship, which is the first of its kind in legal education. It reflects the success of STEM Future Lawyers, which having initially drawn on Legal Cheek’s network of students now is a community in itself with over a 1,000 live members at universities across the UK.”

STEM students are increasingly in demand in the legal profession, as law firms pour resources into artificial intelligence (AI) and other lawtech products to boost efficiency. Data and numeracy skills are also becoming more useful than ever in advising clients, many of which are in the process of digitising their businesses and facing new challenges arising from experimentation with AI and blockchain.

For all the latest commercial awareness info, and advance notification of Legal Cheek's careers events:

Sign up to the Legal Cheek Hub

15 Comments

Anonymous

All the firms mentioned in the article will pay GDL fees for students anyway, so what’s the point of this?

Anonymous

So law firms can signal how into tech they are. Look at us, we are hiring scientists!!!

Makes no fucking difference a trained monkey could do a training contract

Anonymous

Depends on the work dunit. An patent barrister / solicitor needs to be able understand the science and is better at the job for doing so. A corporate hack barrister / solicitors need not and is not.

Anonymous

Do Greenberg Glusker pay for the GDL / LPC? I hear they are a top firm.

Greenberg Glusker HR Team

Thank you for your interest in our firm. I regret to advise that after careful consideration, your application will not be taken any further at this time. Your repeated posts were a particular factor. You are too needy.

Anonymous

Yeah as a STEM student, getting this scholarship is an indication that you failed in your goals and ambitions at least for this year. Ultimately, you would rather get full fees paid and a £8k grant rather than a one off 5k hit.

Anonymous

These people have way better career options than law. Their quant skills are wasted in a law firm.

It’s weird, Legal Cheek’s obsession with STEM lawyers.

They’re just playing on your insecurities.

Read English and have a great time at uni, frankly.

Anonymous

Money gets everyone’s attention. List the way better options

Anonymous

Banker

Automation specialist at Google

Actuary

PhD student at CERN

Anonymous

That’s just a list of jobs/activities requiring varying degrees of maths.

I think the point is that people of all backgrounds are interested in money. None of those jobs pays unequivocally better than law (and banking and actuarial science are widely considered more boring, I’d argue).

Financial rewards attract many humanities studies towards law, why would STEM students be any different? They don’t all want to be doctors or academics.

STEM graduate (Associate at one of the firms listed above)

Completely agree with this.

I have innumerable friends working as actuaries and it does not interest me in the slightest. Friends working in tech at start ups seem to be doing more interesting work however it is far riskier.

Have I used my scientific background in my role? No (not yet).

Anonymous

I have a friend who is an actuary. He refers to his job as being “for those who consider accountancy too prohibitively exciting”.

Anonymous

I really don’t think this is the first scheme to pay towards a GDL for a STEM student. Plenty of STEM students get training contracts which come with fees paid.

Anonymous

Prime Minister Jeremy Corbin 2019

4 day week

Double the minimum wage

Release student debt

FOR THE MANY, NOT THE FEW!!

Anonymous

And the annual non-sequitur award goes to….

Plus it’s spelled (I’m sure you’d write spelt) Corbyn

Join the conversation

Related Stories