News

News readers, taxi drivers, waiting staff and the police more trustworthy than lawyers, new research shows

By on
4

Trust in judges also dips

Public trust in lawyers and judges has dropped over the past year, new research has shown.

A little over half (57%) of those surveyed by market research outfit Ipsos said they trusted lawyers, a 2% dip on the 2021 figure. The result means lawyers were deemed less likely to to tell the truth than television news readers (58%), the police (63%), taxi drivers (66%), and serving staff at restaurants (75%).

Public trust in judges also took a hit this year. The latest figures show 80% of the public trust members of the judiciary, again a 2% drop on the previous year’s result. Judges tied with professors on the trust-o-meter and sit just behind museum curators and teachers (both 81%).

The 2023 Legal Cheek Firms Most List

The research, based on the responses of over 1,000 members of the public, found nurses were the most trustworthy (89%) and politicians the least (12%).

4 Comments

Mark

Notwithstanding that these surveys are often based on stereotypical biases that the public has, in conjunction with an extremely small sample size, it always amazes me the disparity between trust in judges and trust in lawyers when the majority of salaried judges are former lawyers or still in practice as fee paid judges. Perhaps the public don’t understand that fact

(9)(0)

No

Nurses top? This crass fetishisation of the NHS has to be addressed.

(6)(0)

Anonymous

Who cares? The general public knows nothing about what “lawyers” actually do. They are all lumped into one big vague category.

Today I have (1) drafted a share purchase agreement; (2) advised a company on a regulatory matter; (3) taken instructions on an asset purchase; and (4) supervised a due diligence report. Hardly anything evil or corrupt, although that would be so much more fun.

(5)(0)

I see you

But you’re sleeping with the married secretary aren’t you? Slightly evil

(0)(0)

Comments are closed.

Related Stories