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A law student’s honest Christmas holiday diary

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49

Eat, drink and be merry? Try easements, deadlines and mood swings

snow

Christmas, they say, is a time to kick your feet up and relax. But for an aspiring lawyer with impending training contract deadlines and exams, it’s not always that easy.

I’m Farah, I’m a student on the Legal Practice Course and here’s a little peak into what I’ve done and what I’m going to be doing over the festive and new year period…

16, 17, 18 December: Those first few days of ‘chill’

Following the wretched wills (alliteration intended) exam on Friday 16, I was given the next few days to put my feet up and smoke a cigar (or stock up on strawberry laces). I used these days to just take a breather, go out for dinners and brunches, and binge on Netflix before things got real again…

19, 20 December: Getting some work experience in the bag

I was able to secure a couple of days’ work experience with Legal Cheek. It was an attempt at boosting my CV, to understand and experience legal journalism.

I realise that those not as fortunate as myself would either have started revision for the upcoming exams at this time, or used it to further Netflix-binge. I hear you guys. Whatever you decided to do in these two days though, you know you have to really up your game in the next few days to get your work in order.

21, 22, 23 December: Nailing that revision

I mustered up the courage to look at my incomplete lecture/workshop notes from the previous term before I thought of the upcoming despair of filling in those notes. I viewed my friends’ snapchats to see who’s into the revision swing — and how competitive I had to be. The results were somewhat nerve-wracking.

Overcoming this, I prepared a short and concise revision plan to complete all possible work I could encounter in the coming few days. I spent just over three hours working on this short revision plan before I decided it was time to kick things off. Oh, but I had to have lunch first.

Shortly after, I discovered that my local library is shut for maintenance. So home it was. I wrote tirelessly before my fingers became numb.

24, 25, 26, 27 December: Cornwall

These four festive days were spent in cosy Cornwall where walks and dinner at Fish House were the highlights of the break. I forgot all about work and exams to give myself much needed time off from the work done in the previous week. The five hour drive back home gave me enough time to reflect on my blessings and how the next few days of revision will decide my fate as a future corporate lawyer.

28, 29, 30, 31 December: Looking ahead…

Needless to say, things are real, my break is over and I need to become an expert in solicitors’ accounts and legal writing (in prep for those early January assignments).

The plan is to compile a set of beautifully highlighted notes, attempt all previous past papers archived on solicitors’ accounts and practice writing the most sophisticated letter of instruction you could imagine.

However, I know this won’t come easy. There will be many friends who have to be disappointed at my last minute cancellations, family whose dinners I can’t be a part of and training contract deadlines I just wouldn’t have time for. You can’t please everyone, particularly as a law student.

31 and 1 January 2017: Wedding or clubbing?

New Year’s Eve will again be a matter of choosing who to ditch; my old friend who will be wedded that night or the club event which I’ve been looking forward to attending for ages. No matter what I do, somebody will get hurt. And that’s just life.

But free travel ALL night. Enough said.

1, 2, 3 January 2017: Last minute revision panic

After exploiting the free travel that I’ve looked forward to for the past 12 months, it’ll be time to grind my teeth and refresh that memory.

It will take some sleepless nights and much needed 2am McD’s, but it will mean that I hit the revision hard and do everything I can to have it all sink in.

To ensure that I get that distinction, I plan to stick up all my revision cards on the wall, creating a somewhat disintegrated wall rainbow. An effective form of revision as many of you will agree. At the same time, I’ve also got to have those workshops prepared for. And don’t bloody forget to apply for TCs. Christ.

49 Comments

Anonymous

And the really sad thing is, once you’ve done with all the hard work of exams, work experience and applying for TCs, you’ll find that law is a rather mundane, frustrating, stressful career and you’ll wish you’d hadn’t even bothered in the first place.

(28)(7)

MC Associate

You’ve just written in a public article that being a Corporate lawyer is not what you really want to do…. good luck getting a TC now.

(43)(1)

Adam Fouracre

They said the same thing to me, mate.

Guess what xD.

(3)(5)

Anonymous

You joined Jones Day, got butt fucked.

(7)(0)

Anonymous

Grats on getting your MMS TC offer. Do they know you openly complained on LC about your previous employers? Oh wait, you had LC remove that article!

(6)(1)

Anonymous

Where did she write that?

She doesn’t say that.

(0)(0)

MC Associate

The sentence was deleted following the comment. What’s even better is that my comment flagging that the sentence was also deleted. I sense a coverup… nice try Farah.

(11)(0)

MC Associate

Flagging that the sentence was deleted was also deleted*

(0)(0)

Anonymous

10 days studying/revision in a 21 day period. Hardly prepares you for life in the corporate world, where you’d probably be working 15+ days in the same period despite the bank holidays.

And does this article have to much of a hint of spoilt rich kid does the LPC, or is it just me?

(34)(4)

TurboKhunter

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(0)(2)

TurboKhunter

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(1)(2)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(5)(2)

Anonymous

This article is career suicide…

1) states not really interested in becoming a corporate lawyer, just doing it for the money

2) comes across as completely selfish – talks about someone’s always getting hurt no matter what she chooses, and yet where is the hurt if she misses out on some crappy overly expensive NYE club night?

3) makes it sound like she hasn’t got time for everything, when clearly if she didn’t spend time going on “brunches, dinners and Netflix” maybe she would have time to make an TC application here or there.

4) Talks about needing “much needed time off” over the Xmas weekend, when she had three days off only five days previously.

5) is deluded if she thinks the revision she will do for the LPC will “decide her fate” and help her become a corporate lawyer. Her attitude and this article will be the huge factors that “decide her fate”, and unfortunately not in a positive way.

(31)(3)

Anonymous

Honey…. I wish I had your confidence in doing basically no revision over a 3 week period and then acing the exams. It was my birthday on one of these days and I still spent some time doing a few applications. Good luck to you!

(2)(3)

Anonymous

In fairness the January exams she’s on about are not hard. Write a letter, do some accounts and some multiple choice questions. And they’re pass/fail. 50% to pass. She’s being overly dramatic to make herself sound more intelligent (which she clearly isn’t if she’s writing an article about how much she doesn’t really care for corporate law rather than applying for TCs).

(8)(1)

TurboKhunter

A pass on the LPC isn’t going to get you into City law alongside a “_First_” from Westminster.

You really ought to have a Distinction to get through the sift.

(5)(0)

Anonymous

True. Perhaps her mistake was to do the LPC without a TC in the first place.

(4)(0)

Trumpenkrieg

“Needless to say, things are real”

Forensically astute.

(6)(0)

Anonymous

What kind of nonsense is this? Why the hell are you applying for TC’s if you do not even want to become a corporate lawyer? Honestly, the city is filled with miserable bunch only because just like you they are doing it for the money.

(5)(0)

Anonymous

literally no hope

(3)(0)

Josh

For god’s sake can everyone in this comments section lighten up! It’s a jokey, light hearted piece about the reality of life as a law student. I can really relate, when I was at law school I hated Xmas break when all my friends were out partying and I was stuck to my desk. Get over it commenters

(3)(24)

Thumper

Hi Farah, didn’t know you liked being called Josh.

(13)(1)

Anonymous

The first rule of jokes, is that they are supposed to be funny. This is just a load of self indulgent bull. There’s no humour to it at all.

(12)(1)

Anonymous

It’s all a load of nonsense.

Whoever heard of anyone getting married on NYE, and if they did why would you eto go to a club and miss a close friend’s wedding…?

(5)(0)

Postal

“I was able to secure a couple of days’ work experience with Legal Cheek.”

Congratulations, you’re on your way to legal oblivion.

(28)(1)

Tommy Connelly

You better stfu dickwad, I’m enjoying a far better career at LC than if I became a barrister!

Shame about the BPTC tho, had to remortgage my nana’s house to pay for it…

(9)(6)

Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(1)(3)

Katie Kinger

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(1)(1)

Anonymous

Need to work on attention to detail if you’re going to be a lawyer, or even get through the TC process… see “peak” instead of “peek”

(8)(0)

Anonymous

When did you find time to write the drivel that is called an article ?

(16)(1)

Biq diq

Honesty doesn’t always help, especially in the big, backstabbing corporate world.

(3)(1)

Anonymous

The comments are mostly childish nonsense yet again: potty-mouth ‘banter’ or aggressive, priggish ‘wisdom’.

Always happens with solicitor stories. Wish this site was only open to barristers.

(3)(13)

Anonymous

Something everyone going into a career in law should keep in mind: when people are interviewing you, they will often google you first. I always do. What they find (if anything- some are sensible enough to have no online presence that can easily be found) will help them to form an impression of you. That impression may be totally inaccurate and very unfair, but nevertheless said impression will be formed.

If I found this article 20 minutes before interviewing them, it may cause me concern about the maturity of an individual and whether I would feel comfortable putting them in front of a client as a trainee. It has the potential to create a doubt I would otherwise not have. I have absolutely no idea what the author is like in real life – they may be excellent and very mature – but the point is impressions are formed very easily and potentially unfairly. Always keep that in mind and guard against this wherever you can. Applicants should be very cautious about their online profile and that includes hiding facebook profiles and twitter accounts etc.

(13)(1)

Anonymous

And which firm are you from?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Irwin Mitchell. Finest shop in London.

(0)(0)

Working all hours

If this is what revision and study is to an LPC student, they know nothing about hard graft. At her stage (BPTC) I gave myself Christmas day off and that was it. Worked my butt off solidly from 7am til 10pm everyday. I got the top result and could only dream to have the ‘relaxation’ days she mentions. It sounds like a lot of time wasted to me. Sadly it does not stop there. I have a trial, drafting and opinions to prepare. I have only given myself Christmas day off again this year, even then, I did not enjoy it because I was thinking about work anyway. I’m sorry but Farah is not working as hard as she thinks she is. It may be that she doesn’t need to, but if that is so, stop wasting time doing an article to make yourself feel better.

(9)(2)

Anonymous

Boo hoo. Crim bar not giving you enough for your £12.50 a day.

Do everyone a favour and piss off?

(0)(2)

Working all hours

Haha jerk. Chancery bar. I suggest you jump in a hole and stay there.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Having observed this thread why don’t you grow a pair…. that is life at the bar for many whatever their practice area; get your facts right.

(1)(0)

Cockney Geezer

So much rabbit and pork for a Jekyll and Hyde article. You’ve been propa mugged off again wif this bubble bath site

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Is this a parody article?

Reflecting on this comment and how it will affect me as a future corporate lawyer.

(4)(0)

LPC student

You are really not trying as hard as you think dear. I am doing the LPC on an accelerated basis (BVC exemptions). Meaning I am doing the course in 9 months whilst doing a full time job. I am in weekends and need to take half a day off each week from work for the next 6 weeks to fit in an elective and then going back into work in the afternoon. I will not even say that it is hard to do, it comes down to discipline and time management.

(7)(0)

Anonymous

You’re an idiot. Congratulations on making your life extremely difficult. No sympathy… sox mate

(0)(2)

Anonymous

No offence pal but are you even a law student let alone a practitioner cos you really are deluded

(0)(0)

Anonymous

All of you bitching about this article being anti-lawyer and sentiments of spoilt rich kid… quit being pricks.

It’s Legal Cheek, take it with a pinch of salt.

You’re probably being sour because you don’t have a TC.

Good luck with your life wank stains.

(0)(2)

Anonymous

I took you seriously til I saw your gross last two words. It is also wrong to assume those commenting don’t have a TC or on fact want or need one. They might be barristers, judges, ilex.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

I’m going to assume if they at that level then they either have too much time on their hands or have enough spare to to indulge in the bantz

(0)(0)

Tunde Tunde

Hi there Farah. Well done on graduating from Westminster University, its such a top law school. Your future is no doubt bright! Did you consider working for me?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Tunde got a 2:2 from London Met. Thinks he’s a fucking pariah.

(0)(0)

Comments are closed.