News

City trainee confession: ‘I earn £45,000 a year and spend obscene amounts on ASOS — but my mum still pays my phone bill’

By on
115

Money diary of a corporate rookie revealed

Image credit: Twitter (@Lauratobin1)

A trainee City lawyer and self-confessed ASOS addict has revealed her mother still foots her phone bill — despite earning a salary of £45,000.

The anonymous 24-year-old rookie has recently graduated and is now working at a “swanky firm” in London, according to a piece she’s written in lifestyle website Refinery 29. She adds: “Yes, I have sold my soul to the corporate world.”

The trainee, who takes home around £2,580 after tax each month, lives in London with her boyfriend (also a lawyer) and pays £745 per month for her half of the rent. As for her other monthly expenses:

“I try very hard to avoid keeping track of what I spend (usually an obscene amount on ASOS and Deliveroo). I am very generous with money and find stingy people very hard to deal with.”

After providing a breakdown of her monthly expenses — including a £135 student loan repayment, £200 towards a Help to Buy ISA and £450 in other savings — she confesses that her mother still covers the cost of her phone bill. The trainee says:

“Yes, I am 24 and yes, my mother still pays for my phone bill (love you Mum). We have agreed that she will continue to pay until my contract is up in a year’s time.”

This helps free up the trainee to spend, in her words, “a vast amount on drinks with friends after work and food”. Other monthly expenses she does cover include: an £80 subsidised gym membership, £9.99 for Spotify, £15 on a Beauty Box membership, £10.42 for a subscription to The Times and £2.49 for storage on iTunes.

The 2018 Firms Most List

Money aside, the newbie solicitor explains life at the corporate coal face is unpredictable and often includes “all-nighters” at the office. She continues:

“It is also highly stressful and there is a lot of pressure. I regularly spend periods of time sitting at my desk mooting the idea of packing it all in and moving abroad. Alas, I don’t think I would be able to survive on a reduced salary.”

This isn’t the first time a lawyer has, anonymously, gone public with money matters.

In 2016, one high-flying City solicitor revealed that she struggles to save despite earning a hefty £72,000 a year. Equating to take home income of £3,184 each month, the London-based international dispute resolution specialist confessed to putting aside just £600. Her monthly spending log includes: housing costs (£950), a cleaner (£72), gym membership (£99), and that all important Netflix subscription (£9).

For all the latest commercial awareness info, and advance notification of Legal Cheek's careers events:

Sign up to the Legal Cheek Hub

115 Comments

Kim’s Trump Daddy

The quality of LC’s journalism forever getting better and better. Also a salary of £45,000 and you can’t pay your own phone bill. Get in the bin.

(110)(3)

Anonymous

Throw the whole trainee away

(57)(4)

Anonymous

That girl is heading for Love Island.

(42)(2)

Corbyn. Sympathiser

Oh, when did your mum qualify?

(4)(0)

Anonymous

That’s nothing, I spend £45k/year on my trainee. Suppose at least I get a return only my investment.

(6)(2)

Genghis Khan

Very concerning that her monthly expenditure makes no provision for personal hygiene products.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

£80 for a SUBSIDISED gym membership?

I KNOW there are Puregyms in London!

(25)(0)

Anonymous

No Puregym costs even close to £80 a month after subsidy.

She obviously goes to either a Nuffield Health Club or a Virgin Active, or maybe a Soho Gym / Gymbox.

(11)(3)

Jiminiy Billy-Bob

With the ‘obscene amounts spent on Deliveroo’, I hope her membership includes a PT

(22)(1)

Nicky Larson

That must be sort of equinox style gym.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

Nope, Virgin Active sets you back just as much.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Who cares?

(26)(0)

Anonymous

Legal Cheek, apparently.

(11)(0)

Anonymous

you do…you did click on it

(5)(0)

Anonymous

Isn’t this the norm for everyone? Effing love clothes!

(4)(13)

Anonymous

You Sir, need to re-evaluate your life.

(7)(2)

Anonymous

You do!

(5)(1)

Anonymous

😂😂😂 amazing comeback

(2)(0)

5 year old in a random

You poo your pants!

(1)(0)

Anonymous

This is stupid

(5)(0)

Ugh

This is, frankly, appalling. And this is why other juniors in City firms are such wet blankets (background: am also a city junior, same income, rent my own place in zone 1, save 1.5k a month, don’t require supplementing by my parents)…

(40)(142)

loljkm8

Hang on, you earn £2,580 pcm and save £1,500 pcm all whilst living in Zone 1? Really? Do you live in a shoe cupboard? £1080 pcm to cover your rent, food, subscriptions & memberships to gym/whatever else?

I’m not saying it’s impossible but I’d be really curious as to what your breakdown of expenses are (if you are happy sharing said details).

(67)(1)

Anonymous

Not OP, but I can see that happening. It’d be hard, but it’s possible. I pay 800 quid for rent, with bills, council tax etc included. Decent sized room in a nice house zone 1, live with friends. Food + gym is another 250 quid, entertainment and travel are about 100 quid each. That’s 1250. Another 50 for things like phone bills + netflix, amazon etc, and that’s 1280 left. Can see a person saving an additional 200 on that, but it’d be hard, but definitely possible.

(5)(6)

Corbyn. Sympathiser

How much per month do you give to the poor? Nothing, I suspect, shameful capitalist.

(10)(10)

Anonymous

His taxes pay for all the illegal immigrants in the UK

(18)(14)

Corbyn. Sympathiser

He or she isn’t paying enough tax though under May (aka Maggie Jr). 100% tax for the rich is more appropriate, as it will be under JC!

(0)(6)

Anonymous

Said like a true socialist. How many people do you think will bother working if they were taxed their entire income?!! So if nobody works, where does the money come from?

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Definitely possible for someone training at City Titan Irwin Mitchell.

(7)(2)

Benny Goodman

Maybe the poster who set out the breakdown on costs in zone 1 has found an amazing market-busting deal, or more likely they are simply not paying a market rent (i.e. they are renting from someone who is willing to rent to them at below market).

(2)(0)

Anonymous

This really does prompt further questioning unless you’re talking out of your backside..

(6)(0)

Anonymous

You also have no fun, no life and no intimacy or flavour. Well done for being an up-tight stuffed shirt.

(8)(2)

Anonymous

You can always get free condoms from the NHS.

(7)(1)

Anonymous

Utter BOLLOCKS mate, explain.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

100% bullsh*t, you’d be looking at well over a grand per month for somewhere on your own in zone 1 for an awful studio. Plus bills and council tax that you wouldn’t be splitting with others. That puts you on close to £1500 at least before you even factor in travel, food, clothes, phone and any semblance of a social life.

(7)(0)

Anonymous

Hear hear.

(1)(0)

Kimberly Clark Ltd

Drynites prevent wet blankets and are very popular with her generation.

(0)(1)

Tim

Would you mock a person for wearing glasses or a hearing aid for their disability?

Would you mock a person in a wheelchair or with a learning disability for having their disability?

If not, why are incontinence aids fair game for comedy?

People who are incontinent in the day or night use these things to preserve their dignity. Why the hell should an incontinence brief be treated any different to a pair of glasses???

(1)(2)

Kimberly Clark Ltd

To answer your questions in turn:

1. Yes.
2. Yes.
3. Irrelevant, as answer above was yes.
4. Cos it’s funny.

(1)(1)

Tim

Well you’re just a lovely person aren’t you?

Do you think it would still be funny if you were a visually impaired, deaf wheelchair user with incontinence?

If that ever happens to you, I hope someone pulls down your trousers, exposes your incontinence nappy and points and laughs LOUDLY.

I’m sure, being the sort of good sport that you are, that you would laugh along, of course?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Hooray for millennials! Truly a worthless generation.

(12)(14)

Anonymous

Does your Mummy still wash your sheets for you, Snowflake?

#generationDrynites

(5)(4)

Anonymous

No, your mum does, since I was in her bed.

(4)(1)

Anonymous

If you were in her bed, then surely it would be her sheets she was washing? Probably because you shat in it coz you’re scared of the Baird?

(4)(6)

Anonymous

These are the comments that we come to Legal Cheek for.

(2)(1)

Anonymous

Someone let the GCSE law kids on the school computers without supervision again…

(3)(0)

Anonymous

BORING!!!!!

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Bloody millennials

(1)(5)

Anonymous

As a millennial, I was triggered and deeply offended by your post.

(12)(1)

Anonymous

Don’t commit your hate crimes here. HATE CRIMES!

(2)(0)

Millennial

Using capitals is a micro-aggression which I find offensive.

(6)(0)

Trumpenkrieg

Hate crimes do not exist

(2)(2)

Anonymous

Thoroughly vacuous.

(2)(0)

Edgar Allan Hoe

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door—
“‘Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door—
Only this and nothing more.”

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore—
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore—
Nameless here for evermore.

And the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me—filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating,
“‘Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door—
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door;—
This it is and nothing more.”

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
“Sir,” said I, “or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you”—here I opened wide the door;—
Darkness there and nothing more.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before;
But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,
And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, “Lenore?”
This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, “Lenore!”—
Merely this and nothing more.

Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
“Surely,” said I, “surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore—
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;—
‘Tis the wind and nothing more!”

Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore;
Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door—
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door—
Perched, and sat, and nothing more.

Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,
“Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,” I said, “art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore—
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night’s Plutonian shore!”
Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning—little relevancy bore;
For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
Ever yet was blest with seeing bird above his chamber door—
Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
With such name as “Nevermore.”

But the Raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
Nothing further then he uttered—not a feather then he fluttered—
Till I scarcely more than muttered “Other friends have flown before—
On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.”
Then the bird said “Nevermore.”

Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken,
“Doubtless,” said I, “what it utters is its only stock and store
Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful Disaster
Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore—
Till the dirges of his Hope that melancholy burden bore
Of ‘Never—nevermore.'”

But the Raven still beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird, and bust and door;
Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking
Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore—
What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt and ominous bird of yore
Meant in croaking “Nevermore.”

This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing
To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom’s core;
This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining
On the cushion’s velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o’er,
But whose velvet violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o’er,
She shall press, ah, nevermore!

Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer
Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor.
“Wretch,” I cried, “thy God hath lent thee—by these angels he hath sent thee
Respite—respite and nepenthe, from thy memories of Lenore;
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe and forget this lost Lenore!”
Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

“Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil!—prophet still, if bird or devil!—
Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,
Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted—
On this home by Horror haunted—tell me truly, I implore—
Is there—is there balm in Gilead?—tell me—tell me, I implore!”
Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

“Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil—prophet still, if bird or devil!
By that Heaven that bends above us—by that God we both adore—
Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore—
Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore.”
Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”

(6)(15)

Anonymous

Killed it

(4)(0)

Giggles

That name – dead 😀 😀 😀

(4)(2)

TheAcresOfFour

TLDR

(10)(0)

Anonymous

If only Tinky-Winky, Dipsy and Laa-Laa could write so eloquently…

(3)(0)

Edgar Allen Hoe

Don’t forget Poe, or as my name would say “Hoe”.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

If the firm was really swanky, then she would get a free iPhone and free dinner after 7pm like we do.

(23)(9)

Anonymous

If your firm was really ‘swanky’ you’d probably be working to hard for your free dinner and iphone and unable to comment on shit articles at 2.02pm on a Wednesday afternoon.

(50)(2)

Anonymous

1. You don’t have a TC. Suck it up.
2. If you did, you’d know that very often you’re totally dead at work when it’s slow. I can bet though someone is going to think of something “urgent” for me to do at 5.30pm which they could have given me earlier today.
3. I order deliveroo, sometimes even at 6pm (still fine) and leave as soon as it has come. Given that I rarely leave before 7 anyway or if it’s slow and 6.30, there’s always some admin to do to wrap up, I get free dinners about 3 or 4 days a week.
4. Lunches are also often provided from left overs at meetings where no one has touched it. We order it in from a fancy restaurant nearby.

Stay salty.

(10)(18)

Corbyn.Sympathiser

Shut up.

(18)(2)

Anonymous

Legal Cheek is going to start deleting comments

(2)(0)

Anonymous

“Start”? You mean “continue”, right?

(5)(0)

Anonymous

*”continue” of course!

(0)(0)

Anonymous

It’s okay, you guys will get used to deleted comments…

Kim Jong Un

If you consider free food sufficient compensation for all the overtime that you do then you are really to be pitied.

(13)(1)

Anonymous

That “stay salty” response is mainly waffle.

Your daily agenda seems to focus around food. Any chance you eat your feelings?

(5)(0)

Kim Jong Un

“Lunches are also often provided. We order it in from a fancy restaurant nearby”, any chance this “fancy restaurant” is on deliveroo?

(2)(0)

Anonymous

I get a free iphone and free dinner if working late, and I still fork out for a separate personal phone and I usually rush home rather than have to eat at my desk.

Plenty of things in life are free, does not make them always good / desirable.

(16)(3)

Anonymous

I’m disillusioned but this is crap.
IF you work late.

IF you are at a decent city firm, i.e. the MC, SC or US, you WILL be working late.

This free dinner thing is one of the few legitimately good things about law firms. All I have to do is give a receipt to my secretary which I can either email or just put on her desk. It is very easy.

Free cabs too, although I don’t take them.

If you’re not taking advantage of free dinners you are a mug. You’re not getting off before 7 with any frequency if you’re at any decent firm above.

One of the costs you incur is moving close to the office to be able to bear those hours. There are trainees shot and cabs back every night but it’s a bit ballsy imo, although their hourly rate varies from 2-500 depending whether it’s a UK or US matter so peanuts really.

Free phone…most people can’t deal with a personal AND work phone. In terms of forking out for your personal phone, i) I am am very cynical but there is zero reason for it ii) in practise 90% find 1 phone easier to manage iii) how much is a Giffgaff contract, 8 quid a month? Don’t get an expensive phone contract for an additional phone.

Balls to wall madness and misleading the students.

(4)(2)

Anonymous

Ha! This is hilarious.

At my high-street firm doing Crime I get an iPhone with unlimited data that I’m allowed to use for personal use and the partners regularly buy us dinner.

9-5 hours, extra pay for out of hours work, interesting cases and I’m still a higher rate taxpayer.

Selling your soul and time to a city firm for a “free” iPhone is kidding yourself that you’re living life to the full.

(8)(5)

Anonymous

In fact, I earn more than little miss snowflake, here!

(0)(1)

Billy big bollocks

You’re hard

(0)(0)

2 PQE and jaded

This pathetic pondlife is happy with a firm-issue 2-year-old iphone monitored by IT and unwilling to spend max. 50 quid p/m on having incredible handheld technology constantly available for completely private use?

Shows how some trainees these days think I suppose.

Also, yes, we all fucking know how the expenses system works for free food. You’re clearly new enough to find it an exciting novelty. Personally if I have to pay a few quid extra for something a) healthier and b) able to be eaten at home rather than over my keyboard like a troll, then I’m more than wiling to pay.

I suppose it depends whether you’re a tightarse.

(3)(4)

Anonymous

Pathetic pondlife here. I’m sorry your firm issues you old phones, mine doesn’t, they’re all brand new. And as I pointed out re cynicism, my IT does not monitor usage in any meaningful way. It’s also pretty well known that buying a handset outright and having a cheap Giffgaff contract is usually cheaper than phone contract; contracts look more affordable to people (like you perhaps) who don’t have the money to buy outright spare, but are much more expensive overall.

Also very confused at your understanding of the expenses system. It is confusing why you feel limited in terms of what you can order, even a supermarket bill you can expense, you can expense any food you like, no matter how healthy or unhealthy. Hope this helps.
In terms of eating over your desk, well you can eat in the restaurant, you can eat in the firm kitchens, you can take it home like I do. Or even go home and eat and then go back into work if necessary.

Sometimes I don’t bother eating it and just put it in the fridge for lunch the next day.

It’s relevant because if you work for a decent firm it is a cost saving and this ‘article’ is specifically about the cost of a phone contract and food expenses, both of which are significantly alleviated.

Honestly I can’t speak to all law firms and their specific policies. Mine is a US firm and is overall much more generous and relaxed about these things. I do look down on firms like Dentons, (guessing the sort of firm where you may be). I didn’t enter that market for a career. US firms are generally more chilled towards expenses, general bureaucracy, pay double and treat associates like adults. Hours are horrendous, but that’s the trade off and things are in place to make it better. At firms like DLA and Dentons, the hours are usually just as bad, if only marginally lighter, being paid half as much and they treat you like children. I wouldn’t have applied and don’t identify with them.

(4)(28)

Kim Jong Un

Are you going to be okay?

(3)(1)

Anonymous

It’s so obvious who wrote this.

(1)(0)

Kim Jong Un

Yes, Kim Jong Un.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

U ok, Un?

Anonymous

Why exactly do you look down on DLA or Dentons? Let me guess: you also think CMS is “shyte”, am I right? It’s gimps like you who give City workers a bad name.

(9)(1)

Anonymous

Because they’re crap firms. CMS is also crap. Quality of intake is generally lower.
But you have to be an idiot in terms of common sense to work there. There are better careers which work you less and pay you more or at least just as much. The allure of US firms and to some extent MC is the money. It’s literally double. I didn’t and wouldn’t have applied to a Dentons or a CMS. I would have taken literally almost anything else. Banking, government, marketing, whatever.

(1)(14)

Anonymous

“Because they’re crap firms. CMS is also crap. Quality of intake is generally lower.”

You’ve still not provided a shred of evidence or reasoning as to why they’re “crap firms”. If it is types like you that populate these US firms you speak so highly of, then best of luck to them.

Anonymous

To work for…
– low salaries relative to the complexity of the worm performed
– more bureaucracy
– CMS is a sh1tshow merger
– both have financial issues and are dramatically weaker in terms of revenue per lawyer and PPP, i.e their billables and origination is relatively crap
– the best partners leave to go to US firms, why earn 400k-600k as head of a group bringing in all the work when you could be on twice that at a US?
– trainee retention is crap relative to US firms especially
– lower quality trainee and associate intakes
– you get beasted as much as US firms for half the pay
– Dentons has relatively discreetly made a lot of associate layoffs in London way way way over the norm for city law.
– bad bad vibes and bad politics in both those firms especially

They’re crap. As I say, after tax it’s not worth it, for 10k less you could easily find something so much more interesting and 9-5. Doing the US law firm is different, it’s a trade off but there are benefits and complicated things with mortgages and salaries and buy to lets that you’re too young to understand.

Anonymous

“complicated things with mortgages and salaries and buy to lets that you’re too young to understand.”

Haha that’s right, because your US firm salary of circa £100,000 before tax will totally be enough to get you a mortgage for someplace decent, and a BTL on top of that. Keep trying mate, it’s highly entertaining so far.

Anonymous

Dogshit

(3)(0)

Corbyn.Sympathiser

I love to eat it. It tastes just great and bits get stuck in my beard and i can save them for later for a sneaky treat. Yummy yummy!!!!!!!!

(0)(1)

Corbyn Sympathiser FAN

Too far mate

(1)(1)

Trumpenkrieg

Your testosterone levels are too low for you to have any sort of a meaningful beard

(0)(2)

Corbyn. Sympathiser

You’re responding to one of my many fans. But I can grow a lovely beard thanks. If I couldn’t, I would naturally get tips from your mother on how she developed her hairy lip.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

I get £3,800 a month after tax and I spend the lot.

(11)(1)

Mr Steal Your Girl

Sorry big lad…

(0)(0)

Sensible

Does anyone really care what this f**kwit spends her money on?

(7)(0)

JD Executive Partner

I spend that in a week on mountains of Magic’s smooth smooth Bolivian powder, several delicious Mayfair escorts, and a growing wad of hush money for 10+ legal secretaries who constantly raise the prospect of a ‘#metoo’ allegation.

I love my life.

(18)(1)

Sensible

I prefer to put all those things on credit cards and consolidation loans so that come the next credit crisis the snowflake generation can pick up the tab

(5)(0)

Dirty Des

‘£10.42 for a subscription to The Times’ – absolute fucking pisstake. I can understand everything else, but this, effing hell.

(33)(1)

Anonymous

Sad, considering she’s now become a slave to the lifestyle. Lifestyle inflation is real, and if you let it go unchecked, you’ll have worked all your life for hedonism.

(6)(1)

Anonymous

I agree with this, so many people that I know earn more and suddenly spend more. Obviously, the point of earning is to enjoy, but I have seen some people increase their spending habits to excessive levels.

(6)(0)

Sensible

I dont see how “45,000” correlates to “swanky” in this context.

Perhaps she means 45,000 pcm?

(3)(0)

Anonymous

The general public never seem to understand how expensive it is to live in central London (this is compulsory if you want to reach the top in City law because of the long hours – early starts and late finishes)…..

Accommodation alone can eat up 1/3 of your net take home – most people have student loans too … once you start earning over 100k a year repayments are in the high 100s….

These are just some of the costs associated with living in London

(2)(1)

Anonymous

1/3? It can easily be half once bills are accounted for.

But it’s ludicrous to complain. I don’t have much money left at the end of the month but it’s because I go out drinking at weekends, eat out two or three times a week and regularly fly for long weekends. I don’t have to do any of those things and my parents certainly couldn’t afford to at my age. Some trainees are ridiculous, living alone, going on luxury holidays and eating at fancy restaurants all the time. Some are ridiculous the other way and never spend money on anything while living in a shoe box. Either way, it’s enough to live a pretty nice life overall.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

I’m sorry but it simply isn’t true that you need to live in central London to successfully advance your career in the City.

(1)(0)

Jealous 40 year old

I’m going to go against the grain here. Yep, it’s pretty spoilt to have your phone bill paid by your mum at the age of 24 when you’re on a salary way above the national average. But, otherwise, she sounds like she’s saving a decent whack every month and enjoying life. Christ, if I were 24 again, I’d be doing more than spending a bit on ASOS and deliveroo. The gym for £80 a month would go in the bin for a start.

(6)(1)

Jealous 40 year old

Only joking :p

I love the gym and I definitely love to eat a nice tasty flapjack on the way home mmmmhmmm

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Bit of powder

(2)(0)

A London Barrister

£2,500 a month in London, when it looks like you are living a lifestyle where you are (understandably) rewarding yourself, perhaps on reflection a little excessively, and will cause these issues and more.

Yes we all want nice things, yes we think we have arrived so we want them now but as a fair wiser barrister said to me, “its a marathon, not a sprint”. It looks like this person is trying to get all the good things now in one go, relax. It will come. This is probably due in some ways to insecurity. I would know.

As embarrassing as it is to say, in my first 3 years, I know didn’t behave to responsibly financially, or at all, and the figure appearing in my bank account was, in some ways the factor which empowered me to do that.

Also, London is a bloody expensive place to live, and to be able to go out, in SW11, or in town, your looking at £150 a time when you throw in taxis and the inevitable drinking binge.

These things should be luxuries, not everyday things. Don’t spoil your self too much, less you become a spoilt, and entitled shadow of who you wanted to be when you started.

I’m not saying I am perfect, but I see this all the time from new tenant and NQ’s.

And legal cheek, whilst this is a “nice to have a piece” and no doubt students will look to this thinking, great, there’s a light at the end of the blue band shopping list, you are kind of glamorising a serious issue here. Bit more serious next time please, and as always, keep up the great work.

(4)(4)

Anonymous

Bloody hell, who honestly cares? Let her get on with spending her money however she chooses. Anyone with a tc I know who earns that much works extremely hard for the money. Her mum pays her phone bill? Who cares… lots of trainee lawyers I know had parents who could pay their tuition fees meaning they didn’t have to pay £135 a month in repayment of tuition fees…

(3)(0)

Anonymous

I was paying my own phone bill at 15. Albeit PAYG, and supported myself since leaving home at 18yo whilst still in education. £45k a year she should be treating her mum to nice things not the other way around! SNOWFLAKe is the bloody word!

(0)(1)

Corbyn. Sympathiser

To be honest I just stay at home and spank the monkey. It’s cheap as chips and usually I pre-record Prime minister’s questions so I get to watch lovely Jeremy… oow yeah loving it daily whoop whoop!!!!!

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Tahahahaha

(0)(0)

🇰🇵

🎼Kim Jong Style🎶😁

(0)(0)

Deed U No

£45 K (nice work if one can get it)

& your mum stii pays the phone bill – Shame on you !

(0)(0)

Anonymous

And you…

And you…

And you…

And 💩

(0)(0)

Grumpy associate

And that’s why law firms should stop employing 21-22 year olds. I can’t stand most of them. Honestly. Very few act like adults in the office and outside of it.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Enjoy the impending tax rises to fund the failing NHS – then you will have even less money 🙂

(0)(0)

Comments are closed.

Related Stories