Feature

8 horrors of being a law student

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From petrifying printing costs to soul-crushing training contract rejections — law school can be a scary place

Halloween means tricks, treats and fun size Haribo bags galore. But when you’re a law student, your ever-increasing workload might seem even more terrifying than the witches, ghosts and ghouls parading the night-time streets. Here are eight hair-raising horrors every law student will be able to relate to this Halloween.

1. The dreaded 9am lecture

An early start might have seemed doable back when you were starting out as a fresher, but you’ll quickly resort to setting up multiple alarms just to make it to that 9am land law lecture.

2. Scary law school library fines

At some point, you’ll be hit with a bill longer than your reading list and realise that trying to convince the librarian to waive your fee is like drawing blood from a stone. Can that overdue equity and trusts textbook that has been sitting on your shelf since reading week really be costing you 75p a day?

3. Petrifying printing costs

In order to avoid lugging around heavy textbooks you’ll consider using printouts. But you’ll quickly realise the cost of printing out a 192-page court judgment makes neither economic (or environmental) sense.

4. The horror of forgetting to do your seminar prep

Sooner or later you’ll show up to a seminar unprepared only to be asked to explain why the second limb of the Ghosh test was overruled. Eyes on you and unable to answer, you’ll curse yourself for not doing your reading the night before.

5. The agony of trying to work out the ratio decidendi of a Lord Denning judgment

No other judge will mark the memory of law students quite like Lord Denning. His colourful judgments and wild dissents brought life to a subject often viewed as rule-based and dry. However, ask a law student to work out the ratio decidendi (the rationale for the decision) and watch them break out in a panic-filled cold sweat.

6. Terrifying EU case law names

Can we just call it the ‘direct effect’ case rather than Van Gend en Loos v Nederlandse Administratie der Belastingen?

7. The ghastly Watson Glaser test

You’ll realise that not only do you have to ace the law to get your foot in the door of a top law firm, you’ll also have to scrub up on your critical thinking skills.

8. Soul-crushing training contract rejections

After toiling away hours of your time crafting the perfect training contract application, your heart will sink when you receive your first letter of rejection.

Happy Halloween! 🎃

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49 Comments

Anonymous

To be fair, Watson Glaser tests are actually very useful. Of course, not that they prove one’s ability to put capital markets bibles together or do photocopying – they’re more useful in enabling the HR department to allocate a greater part of their day to walking around the office, chatting shit, or reading of the Daily Mail, as opposed to reading the application forms people spent weeks drafting.

(62)(0)

Anonymous

I might not be speaking for everyone, but I’ve always found Watson Glasers are incredibly easy to prepare for, there’s tonnes of free tests out there for people to practice with, for some providers the bank of questions they have is surprisingly small; I’ve probably still got about 10-20 answers memorised from my TC application days. Psychometric tests on the other hand… those bastards never get any easier.

Separate note: I really want to see how firms go about assessing the application forms and the questions, is it wholly subjective? Do use specific keywords? There’s got to be some kind of formalised process.

(5)(3)

Anonymous

The initial HR sift at our place is based on a “mark scheme” system covering grades, competencies, knowledge of the firm, familial relationships to key clients etc.

When it comes to interview, I was involved in some last year as a current supervisor and wasn’t given any guidance on grading either the CVs or the actual interview itself. I expect the same is true of the partner interviews (and even at firms where HR try to impose grading guidelines on partners, I am sure the partners will ignore them).

(4)(0)

Anonymous

Thanks for the response!

That last bit in the first para “familial relationships to key clients etc.” could you unpack that a bit more for me?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Sorry, humour doesn’t always come across online.

Basically, if your Dad/Mum/Uncle/second cousin is on the board of a major client, you’re going to have a leg up. This isn’t done by any official mechanism, the relationship partner will just flag to HR that the kid is applying.

I think this is less common than it once was, but if the client’s big enough it will still be a factor.

Anonymous

Simples. The firm is more likely to get work from a key client if they give his/her child/nephew/niece/next door neighbour a training contract.

Anonymous

A supertax on all earnings above £80,000!!

Vote Corbyn!!

🤡 🎃

The Clowns are coming for Ronald Coyne tonight!

(3)(2)

Glass jaw!

I’m a fantastic lawyer but that Watson Glaser test kills me. So I got my 12 year old daughter to do the online bit and I passed. Whayhey!

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Low effort.

(6)(1)

Anonymous

Weak.

(6)(1)

Anonymous

Diluted.

(5)(1)

Anonymous

Do Dorsey & Whitney and similar moneylaw outfits use the Watson Glazier test?

(1)(0)

Dorsey Always Ahead

Rumours have it Greenberg Glusker administer the Glusker-Glaser test.

(8)(0)

Anonymous

Top

(1)(0)

Anonymous

It’s a bit like RoF, only not as well written or funny.

(12)(2)

Anonymous

uhh no

(0)(2)

Anonymous

Happy Halloween, y’all. Today I came into work in a cape and fangs.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

Buzzfeed style tripe

(7)(2)

Anonymous

HAHAHAHA SUCH A JOKE

(0)(0)

Anonymous

“19 Comments” but there’s only 12 appearing… HMMMMMMMMMMMMM

(0)(0)

Anonymous

There goes LC, deleting swathes of comments criticising it for deleting comments.

HINT – count the number of actual comments vs the stated amount at the top of the page.

(13)(0)

Anonymous

Funny how Alex keeps comments criticising Aishah but deletes ones about his precious event.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

Do you think ROF would run a story on this?? Might get in touch haha

(3)(0)

Anonymous

DO IT!

(0)(0)

Anonymous

PLEASE everyone send a tip off to ROF

(6)(0)

Anonymous

There was a WHOLE THREAD on this article until 20 mins ago stating the same, Alex is deleting anything to do with it!!!

(8)(0)

Tommy C

Lmaoooooo busted!!!

(6)(0)

Anonymous

Look mate, I work for Wells Fargo and I’m a big fish in my pond. Say what you like about Brexit but I think it is bollocks and my views are pretty relevant and respected.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Fair play mate. Sounds like you have a nice job.

(2)(0)

Deutsche Bank funding secured

Wells gonna Wells.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

i miss KK

(7)(1)

Anonymous

You forgot 9.

Being shafted £200 for a meaningless event.

(14)(1)

Anonymous

STEM grads have way better options than become lawyers – that’s why few do.

It’s just Alex Aldridge trying to foster insecurity in your brain.

(3)(0)

Silver Shamrock Novelties Inc.

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(4)(2)

Dr H

Brilliant!

(0)(0)

Anonymous

🎃👻

(0)(0)

anonymouse

As a law graduate, I now know that the real tough degrees are the scientific ones.

Any degree where you can study for exams by cramming a few weeks prior (and still achieve very good grades) is not an objectively tough degree.

Plus, I also came to understand that at pretty much all universities (also the very “top” ones), most (if not all) exams are very predictable and based off past papers – once again not a sign of what people would consider a very tough degree.

The truth is that a law degree can be extremely demanding if anyone takes it upon himself to do all the readings and try to absorb all the content. While this is commendable, the objective truth is that by studying in a more selective and intelligent way anyone can probably halve the hours of study and boost their grades considerably. Once again, not the signs of a really tough degree.

Of course, I’m not implying law is an easy degree, just that it is not nearly as hard as people want to make it seem. The are, naturally, degrees which are just plain easy, although I am not going to drop any names.

(10)(0)

Anonymous

Don’t be so mean to Alex, he ‘did’ history at Durham ‘university’ and that’s pretty much the sum total of his ‘accomplishments’

(3)(3)

Anonymous

If this horrifies you, you will never ever cope with the BPTC.

(1)(0)

Comments are closed.

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