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Fine for former Schillings operations chief who flogged 95 firm phones

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23

He pocketed over £13,500

The former head of operations at London outfit Schillings has been fined and rebuked by the regulator after it emerged he had been flogging the firm’s mobile phones.

Martin Flowers, who resigned from the media and privacy law specialist in September 2018, received a total of £13,547 for the 95 handsets, which he sold through a phone recycler, according to a regulatory settlement agreement published by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA).

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Flowers’ actions came to light in July 2018 when the firm was alerted by Vodafone after it had identified “unusual activity” on the account. In September 2018, the ex-operations chief admitted to selling the mobile devices during an interview with his line manager and the firm’s head of human resources. He resigned later that day.

Flowers accepted his conduct was dishonest and admitted breaching SRA Principles by taking mobile phones belonging to the firm and selling them for personal profit.

As a result of his actions, the former Schillings man is disqualified from acting as head of legal practice or head of finance and administration of a licenced body, as well as being a manager or being employed by a licenced body.

Flowers was rebuked, fined £13,547 and ordered to pay costs of £600.

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23 Comments

Anonymous

I guess he ended up losing a few schillings.

(33)(0)

Anonymous

Ha! Showing your age there!

I take it you were born before 1971? Lol!

(1)(16)

Anonymous

Or, indeed, he doesn’t know that it’s possible to be aware of things that existed before you were born.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

Exactly! Can’t belie these mouth breathers are allowed near the internet!

(0)(0)

Anonymous

I think you hit a raw nerve there.

(2)(0)

Roger the Codger

No-one in their late 40s or early 50s wants to be reminded that they lived in the era of pounds, shillings and pence because it makes them feel very very

O L D

Just my 2d worth…

(4)(0)

Anonymous

Perhaps he was Austrian, where the currency was the Schilling until 2002?

Anonymous

Tom are you single?

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Are you at Kirkland?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

NO.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

I splashed out on a new computer yesterday. Again.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

If trainees are struck off for dishonestly backdating a letter, a fine for stealing 13 grands worth of phones and selling them seems a tad low.

(13)(0)

Rule of Law

It is downright outrageous, considering theft is considered a “dishonest” offence.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

£600 costs? How very un SRA…

(5)(1)

Anonymous

Very bizarre, imagine in any other circumstance just permitting a thief to repay what he had stole with a small amount towards costs.

Not even banned from working in a law firm, crazy.

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Yeah, dude/dudette! Except, a law firm is a licensed body.

(0)(1)

Anonymous

No it’s not.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

It’s not what you know…

(0)(0)

MC trainee

SRA is a monopoly that needs to be demolished. Something we need to do the undemocratic EU Council.

(5)(2)

Elderly Mannish

McTrainee?

I’ll have fries with that.

You may call me “Sir”.

(0)(1)

JD Trainee

Maybe my eyes are not seeing clearly from the drenching, but my comment has disappeared?

(0)(0)

Puzzled

Why didn’t Schillings report him to the police? Look at the Sentencing Guidelines for Theft. His sentencing range, with the breach of trust, would be 6 months to 2 years imprisonment with a starting point of 12 months.
A reluctance to involve the police is commonplace when this situation arises in the City. Compare the way benefit cheats are treated, or a shoplifter who steals high value goods.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

Because on a cost analysis of time spent having to deal with it, its not worth the price. Its a frank way of putting it, but probably pretty spot on.

They get their money back either way, and thats all thats important.

(2)(0)

Comments are closed.