Round-up

Monday morning round-up

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25

The top legal affairs news stories from the weekend

#MeToo fuels big rise in sex discrimination cases [Financial Times]

Newspaper insists justice at risk after losing case to name multi-millionaire businessman accused of sexual harassment [iNews]

Judges rule that Romanian criminal cannot be deported under EU law [The Telegraph]

Labour threatens ex-staff with legal action amid row over anti-Semitism and whistleblowing [Twitter]

CPS cancels meeting on rape victims’ phone data due to legal action [The Guardian]

Mum sues NHS for £200k after medics ‘failed to perform test to reveal her baby had Down’s Syndrome’ [The Sun]

BBC backlash: Beeb facing legal challenge as viewers raise thousands to tackle ‘bias’ [Express]

The latest comments from across Legal Cheek

‘Helen’s Law’ could see murderers denied parole until they reveal whereabouts of victims [Channel 4 News]

Victims commissioner calls for new online policing force [The Telegraph]

Hope Barden: Sex role-play death prompts law change plea [BBC News]

Bernard Tomic gets legal advice as he prepares to appeal £45,000 Wimbledon fine [Metro]

The law school textbook Kim Kardashian turned into an ‘accessory’ [Above The Law]

Inside Track: How to become a City lawyer — with Baker McKenzie, Hogan Lovells, Mayer Brown, PRIME and BPP Law School [Legal Cheek Events]

“Can’t really fault them to be honest. After hearing about all the work Oxbridge student have to do and the accompanying tutoring, it’s no wonder why employers would prefer students with this background.” [Legal Cheek comments]

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25 Comments

Anonymous

Most (though not all) sex discrimination in the workplace is against men, with some of it being driven by #Metoo. Would be good to see the FT report on this.

Anonymous

Would be good of the left to stfu

Anonymous

Jesus christ.

Anonymous

Indeed, what has ‘the left’ got to do with it? Anyone know what they’re on about.

Anonymous

NDAs can’t be used to prevent reporting of criminal activities to the authorities. In the case in question, the NDA signatories agreed to sign at the time in return for being paid.

Anonymous

Payment can be conditional on no further allegations being made, and the money can be recouped following any allegation, it being common for the parties to agree there was no basis for the allegation as a term of the NDA. Either then the money is paid back under the contract or the contract is void, on the basis you say, and the money has to be paid pack anyway.

90% of the time, NDAs protect businesses against money grabbing liars who want to pocket cash as an exit from their failed careers.

Anonymous

What is the source of your 90% statistic?

Anonymous

Why do you ask?

Anonymous

To see if you fabricate statistics to suit your position.

Anonymous

I don’t. What is your position on NDAs?

Anonymous

Then quote your source. Don’t deflect.

Anonymous

Its not my statistic. For someone so concerned about deflecting you seem remarkably shy about giving your own honest opinion on NDAs.

Anonymous

You stated a 90% statistic but repeatedly refuse to quote your source. You’re a bullshitter.

Anonymous

I didn’t quote any statistics. I asked you for your opinion on NDAs and you had a tantrum and started name-calling.

Anonymous

I was the source of the 90% statistic and it comes from professional experience. It has become even worse in recent years too. You see those that are full of BS are happy to sign away their “rights” for cash.

Anonymous

One person’s experience reflecting an entire industry?

Yeah right, bruv. U mad bro.

Anonymous

In contrast to your zero experience and pidgin English.

Anonymous

The phone disclosure rules are required to combat false allegations. The CPS shouldn’t be bullied into changing course by people who don’t respect the concept of innocent until proven guilty.

Anonymous

Exactly. The feminists don’t care though. They would see more convictions with evidence hidden from juries as a good thing.

Anonymous

The ‘online police force’ described by the victim’s commissioner is unecessary and unaffordable and would divert time and resources away from real crimes to matters which don’t come close to meeting the criminal threshold. Perhaps we need an accused’s commissioner or an internet user’s commissioner to provide some balance.

Anonymous

You’re extremely misguided if you consider one man’s experience represents an entire industry. Also reflects your level of arrogance.

Anonymous

Sexist to assume its a man’s experience. What’s your experience, if any?

Anonymous

I have experience of your mum.

Anonymous

But none of NDAs it would seem.

Anonymous

Nor do you, Mr 90% fabricater.

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