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Over a third of lawyers are sleep deprived, research finds

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Over a third of lawyers and judges are failing to get a good night’s sleep, according to new research.

The findings, based on data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP), found that 32.9% of lawyers and judges are working on less than seven hours of slumber.

The recommended hours of sleep vary across age groups, however the CDCP advises an adult aged between 18 and 60 should get at least seven hours of shut-eye per night.

The research, compiled by mattress company Amerisleep, further found that an even greater proportion of legal support workers (37.5%) are sleep deprived — ahead of fabricators (36.8%) and electricians (36.6%).

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Telephone operators are the most sleep-deprived with over half (58.2%) failing to get their seven hours, followed by transportation workers (54%), such as parking attendants and traffic technicians, train drivers (52.7%) and print workers (50.9%).

For those of you looking for a role that gets the most sleep the most often, the research revealed only 21.1% of air transportation workers, including pilots and flight attendants, failed to get at least seven hours of sleep, followed by supervisors/managers (23.7%) and teachers/instructors (25.2%).

Last summer appeal judges overturned an employment tribunal verdict after finding that the judge at the original hearing had “fell fully asleep not once but twice” while the claimant was being cross-examined.

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22 Comments

Woke. (Literally)

Over a third of lawyers have young children, research finds.

Seriously. The all nighters during university, training contract and early associate years are a doddle compared with the last three years of relentless interrupted sleep (weekends included).

Woe betide those snowflake junior lawyers who don’t get home until gone 2am and then get a solid 5-6 hours of unbroken sleep. My heart bleeds.

You got Ligma

Ok boomer.

Know thy age group

You think boomers are the demographic with toddlers running around at home?

Anon

Oh yes typical parent thinking they have the monopoly on tiredness. Just because you are sleep deprived doesn’t mean someone else isn’t…ffs

Nonny

As someone at the same stage, surely you have some kind of nanny or your wife/partner doesn’t work? In which case, why are you doing the nights?

There’s no way to do City law without that support, as (quite reasonably) absolutely no nursery will accept you ringing up at 6 to ask they keep your kid until 4am or whatever ridiculous time a client has stipulated.

Anonymous

You lawyers are always trying to make things into a competition, even sleep depravation.

Same anonymous as above

*Deprivation. Sorry, I didn’t sleep much last night.

Lord Function

Maybe, but the reason is not work. It may be children, wanting to go out or grab drinks later, wanting to unwind until late etc. Yes sometimes it will be work but for very limited time periods which again most times can be balanced with a proper schedule.

anon

I’m a GDL student and I’m dam sleep deprived. Yet the sleepless nights probably won’t lead to a pupillage in the end because I’m not from a privileged background and I didn’t go to Oxbridge.

Anonymous

Bitter much, darling?

anon

Very much so. Why am I putting myself through this?

Ivana

Believe in yourself.. in all you can do.. and for you, the deals will start to work in your favor. You need to be open to such deals, and they will come, I assure you.

Anonymous

This is the tragic unrealistic new age crap that leaves people at 25 flipping burgers with £50k of debt.

tips@legalcheek.com

What is the name of this burger with £50k of debt? McMortgage?

Kirkland NQ

Why do not you start applying to chambers / law firms? I got my offer on my first day in law school – does not seem to be that hard.

Anonymous

Those that are good enough have no problems whatever their background. Sounds like this snowflake is just getting his sob stories in early.

Anonymous

Yeah, that’s obviously not true. Compare the demographics of those who are Called and those who obtain pupillage. Are you prepared to tell me that many ethnic minorities and working class folk weren’t good enough?

The market is massively oversaturated and chambers, comprised of human beings with the usual conscious and unconscious biases, will factor in matters above and beyond the ability to practise. The stereotypical perception of the Bar as an old boys’ club was not pulled from thin air.

Anonymous

Being called and being good enough are not the same. Nothing wrong with the demographics at entry either, if you had your facts straight. Women are over-represented, and BAME percentages reflect the population as a whole.

Anonymous

@10:07 – relying on what the population as a whole looks like is artificial. What matters is the makeup of all the people trying to enter the profession compared to the makeup of all the people coming out on the other side. Any significant discrepancy indicates a) a problem with the training process, b) proves that BMEs and people from low socio-economic backgrounds are inherently disadvantaged, or c) proves that they are inherently inferior to their white, middle-class peers.

Having completed the BPTC myself and seen the shitshow that is the pupillage process, which the Bar as whole seems to recognise as some sadist rite of passage, I wager it’s (a).

Alex

Many aren’t. Your real problem may be not the lack of a privileged background, but your apparent inability to handle the GDL without sleep deprivation.

Hack

I got plenty of sleep doing criminal work. Some of these summings up went on for ages.

Bob

Why so? I thought English solicitors all slept in and didn’t start work until mid morning?

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