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Law Society launches new junior solicitor support network with JLD becoming ‘fully independent’ from Chancery Lane

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Shift away from ‘siloed divisions’

The Law Society of England and Wales

The Law Society has launched a new Junior Solicitors Network (JSN) in a bid to move away from “siloed divisions” and “positively engage and support junior solicitors”.

The move will see Chancery Lane’s Junior Lawyers Division (JLD), a collection of groups which represent the interests of students, trainees and junior solicitors across England and Wales, become “fully independent” from the Law Society.

The Society says the new network will aim to “positively engage and support junior solicitors, talk about the pressing issues they face and provide easy access to information and resources in order to support their careers”.

Meanwhile, the JLD will now have its own “independent voice and programme of work”.

The current vice-chair of the JLD, Darja Cernobrivec, will become the JSN advisory committee’s first chair. She will hold this role until October 2023.

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Commenting on the new gig, Cernobrivec said:

“I am delighted to launch our new Junior Solicitors Network. Speaking to junior solicitors across the country, one major need emerged above all others, the need for increased engagement and support for junior and aspiring solicitors. We will play our part to ensure that junior solicitors don’t feel alone, but rather a part of one inclusive profession with common vision and determination to excel in their careers and promote the rule of law.”

The Law Society has also created a Juniors Web Hub that will provide a range of resources to support career and personal development, working practices and wellbeing.

On why it is making the switch, Law Society vice president Nick Emmerson said:

“This change is within the wider context of the Law Society working closely and collaboratively with regional and local grouping such as local JLDs and local law societies and shifting from operating siloed ‘divisions’ to establishing inclusive and joined up working via Law Society ‘networks’ in order to encourage greater collaboration and exchange of ideas and perspectives.”

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