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Family law barrister, 34, who completed BPTC in 2007 becomes district judge

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Adem Muzaffer will take up the role later this month

đź“· Adem Muzaffer (credit: 30 Park Place Chambers)

A Cardiff-based family barrister has become one of the UK’s youngest judges. At the sprightly age of just 34, Adem Muzaffer has been appointed a district judge and will serve in the Wales Circuit from 21 January.

Muzaffer — who graduated from Cardiff University in 2005 and was called to the bar in 2007 — is a family law barrister at 30 Park Place Chambers in Cardiff with a focus on private law children and financial remedy matters.

However, this isn’t Muzaffer’s first taste of judicial life. He was appointed a deputy district judge in 2015, and currently sits in both the county court and family court.

The 2019 Chambers Most List

A growing number of fresh-faced lawyers have secured positions on the bench in recent years.

Richard Archer, a criminal barrister at Preston’s 15 Winckley Square, was appointed a recorder in early 2018 — he was just 32 at the time. Meanwhile, Bristol barrister Anna Midgley was elevated to the role of crown court judge aged 33 in early 2016. Around the same time, St Philips Chambers‘ Rosa Dickinson, then 34, was appointed a district judge on the Midland Circuit.

Other eye-catching judicial appointments in years gone by include Ita Farrelly, who only qualified in 2008 and was made a judge in the first-tier tribunal aged 32, and Briony Clarke, who was made a deputy district judge when she was 31.

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63 Comments

Anonymous

Prime Minister Jeremy Corbyn 2019!!

A windfall tax on City greed

FOR THE MANY

NOT THE FEW!!!!

(8)(47)

Anonymous

Well done Muzzy!

(1)(1)

Lord Harley

Major thrusters all of them.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Does he have a YouTube channel though?

(51)(0)

Anonymous

A Cardiff university graduate who practised in Cardiff in family law. With such intellectuals on the bench, the justice system is safe.

(34)(85)

Anonymous

God this is embarrassing.

(40)(3)

Anonymous

So is your mum.

(10)(6)

Anonymous

The district bench is about his level. Leave the intellectual stuff to the intellectuals. It leaves the proper appointments to be taken by the right people. We don’t want the best candidates – Oxbridge barristers practising in London, doing commercial/chancery work – wasted on the infantile stuff dealt with by district judges.

(26)(24)

Anonymous

Comprehensive trolling, to be sure. But really, was it worth the bother?

(2)(1)

AH

It’s some time after the event, but I’ve only just heard about this article. So annoyed am I by some of the comments, I felt the need to write something! Adem was my go-to family barrister in Birmingham on anything unusual or complicated – he really was first rate. Extremely bright, hard working, very personable, and could work his way around the most awkward opponent or judge. Whilst delighted he’s been appointed, it needs to be said that he’s a real loss to the rest of us.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

I’m not being racist or anything, but do you think the fact he is white has anything to do with it? There seem to be very few young black legal professionals in senior positions which is a real shame. Is the system broken?

(9)(66)

Anonymous

Troll in the dungeon.

(24)(1)

Anonymous

What’s the salary like? 150k or thereabouts?

(8)(1)

Anonymous

100k.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

That salary would go a long way in Cardiff

Job security

Why not

It’s like landing an NQ position at Kirkland

Dolla dolla bill yall

(26)(0)

Anonymous

Thanks for that. Not a bad salary (plus pension) and the advantage of knowing when you will be paid and how much. But, 30 or 35 years as a District Judge – just seems as if it would be quite boring after a while.

(14)(1)

Anonymous

You can move up. The current DCJ of Bradford/W Yorks is HHJ Gosnell, who was a high street solicitor starting his judicial career on the district Bench. A very fine judge he is too. Before his current role, he was DCJ at Leeds. Being one of the busiest hearing centres outside London, that made him one of the most senior civil judges below the HC Bench.

(12)(1)

Anonymous

I wonder if that will be the trend in the coming years for higher level judicial appointments – promotions from the lower ranks instead of being appointed from the Bar.

Anonymous

I doubt it somehow. It would be nice if this was the case, but I can’t see it being likely. I think we’ll still see the district Bench being mainly former solicitors, with our learned friends getting all most of the purple and red gowns.

Anonymous

It seems to be becoming a lot more common. Loads of DJs have been promoted to CJ over the last few years. One of the Chancery HHJs in Birmingham (David Cooke), who spends virtually all his time sitting as a s.9 High Court Judge, started off as a DJ and got promoted. DJ Salmon, also Birmingham, was promoted last year to HHJ. Elsewhere DJ Dancey in Bournemouth got made up. DJ Johns QC in Central London CC got promoted to HHJ in about 18 months. DJ Wood in Uxbridge CC the same.

Anonymous

Sorry to display my ignorance, but what is a DCJ? I’ve heard of a senior CJ but I wonder what a DCJ is.

Anonymous

Designated Civil Judge.

Anonymous

Deputy Circuit Judge

Anonymous

No. Not Deputy Circuit Judge (there is no such position); Designated Civil Judge.

Anonymous

Deserving of the appointment solely on the basis of his toight facial hair game.

(42)(0)

Anonymous

But why wasn’t he appointed a QC white males get it after 10 years, why couldn’t he?

(53)(14)

Anonymous

The quickest to silk I have encountered is Winston Hunter QC. He managed to take silk within 15 years of call. He is not white.

The two white silks I used most took respectively 24 years and 25 years.

(13)(1)

Anonymous

You are aware of his background, aren’t you? Where he grew up? The idea that he somehow came from privilege is not only inaccurate, but also gravely insulting to his towering achievements.

And no, I am not Winnie.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

That’s quick but not a record. I think Sumption was 12 or 13 years and Pollock even quicker than that. A guy at 24 Old Buildings did it at 12 years only last year.

(3)(0)

Anonymous

I didn’t claim a record! I note that in yesterday’s list of new silks, Victoria Butler-Cole has done it in 14 years. She may not even be a record in this year’s cohort.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

I think we have a winner.

https://www.39essex.com/barrister/lindy-patterson-qc/

According to this profile, this rare talent managed to take silk seven years BEFORE she was called.

(8)(0)

Anonymous

She is a Scottish solicitor advocate. They now let them become QCs for some reason.

Anonymous

he’s got a nerve, hasn’t he? hope he’s not been appointed purely on the basis of those smokey eyes…

(15)(0)

Anonymous

I guess I will be the first person on the comments to congratulate him. Well done.

(27)(3)

Dr Frankenstein

Is that you Adem?

(3)(2)

Anonymous

^^^ shanter ^^^

(1)(1)

Greenberg Glusker NQ

In a few years i’ll also be the judge – of who is the top, top, toppest of titans practising in the City.

(18)(0)

Anonymous

ugh gas

(0)(1)

Anonymous

No one under 40 should be a judge. In fact, no millennial should be a judge.

(7)(3)

Anonymous

If no millennial is ever a judge, we’re going to run out of judges altogether at some point in the next two or three decades.

(5)(2)

Anonymous

Not at all, we’ll have the next generation by then

(6)(1)

Anonymous

I’m surprised he is giving up a career at the bar to be just a DJ. Generally DJs are failed high street solicitors.

(9)(7)

Anonymous

Easy life, innit. Also, pension.

(10)(1)

Anonymous

The sort of tripe comment that only a failed lawyer would say.
Get a grip you envious toad.

Well done Judge!

(11)(3)

Anonymous

Judge lool. No, genuinely, no one considers DJs to be proper judges.

High Court = legend
Circuit judge = awesome
DJ = oh dear

(10)(5)

Anonymous

He’s a failed barrister.

(5)(9)

Anonymous

In fairness, and I know that’s not what the comments section is for, but a quick look at his chambers profile suggests he’s achieved more in 10 years than many barristers do in their entire career – decent reported cases, Chambers and Partners, Legal 500. I wonder why the abuse?

(15)(3)

Anonymous

I barrister practising in Cardiff in family law is by definition a failure. And giving that up after 10 years speaks for itself.

(20)(10)

Anonymous

He practised in Birmingham until 2017

Anonymous

I’m with this. The guy has solid creds.

(8)(1)

Anonymous

Ha! I saw the headline, and thought it would be a predictable comments section! Usual bitterness and completely ill informed bull.

(12)(3)

Anonymous

By what bizarre standard is accepting a responsible position on a six figure salary a failure?

(8)(2)

Anonymous

Family law has had its legal aid bill slashed quire hard, a barrister also left family law due to legal aid cuts to lecture at Brunel university on a much higher salary.

Brunel University’s law department is a shit law department ranked 80-90 out of 98 law schools in the country on the Guardian league table

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Nonsense

(0)(0)

Katie

Very well deserved. Adem was a fantastic barrister who I instructed regularly when he was in the Midlands. Whilst it is sad the bar has lost him, it’s great to have a younger DJ who will be in touch with the modern world. Congratulations Adem if you see this!

(18)(4)

Anonymous

I don’t know this man, and certainly don’t wish to denigrate him at all by suggesting that his ambition might leave something to be desired. If a successful barrister wants a judicial position, why on earth wouldn’t they take the Recordership/circuit Bench/HC route? Instead, his talents will be completely wasted on box work and lots of nonsense.

(1)(3)

Anonymous

It is because he is not a successful barrister. He is a family law practitioner in Cardiff which makes him, by definition, unsuccessful. Plus, he is a Cardiff university graduate. The district bench is all that someone of his very mediocre professional and academic ability could achieve. Thank goodness he did not end up in a judicial position which matters.

(13)(15)

Anonymous

We have different definitions of success. Yours seems to hinge (or, more correctly, to unhinge) on snobbery and rudeness.

(12)(5)

Anonymous

Do they not have families, or family law, outside London?

Or perhaps the more interesting question is: what is your definition of a successful barrister?

(3)(1)

Anonymous

well done you jobless div

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Dude needs a shave…

(5)(1)

Anonymous

The level of jealousy in here is hilarious.

So many non qualified lawyers and those stuck in associate purgatory with no prospect of partnership are venting their anger at this chap who has achieved far more than they have.

Some dumb cunt will attempt to be funny and claim I am this guy. Clearly not.

(11)(1)

Some dumb c*nt

I am this guy.

(4)(0)

Comments are closed.

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