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Ban for trainee solicitor who turned up to police station with cocaine

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49

Drove there while over the alcohol limit, according to SRA decision

A trainee solicitor has been told he can no longer work in the legal profession after turning up to represent a client at a police station with cocaine.

William Mawdsley, who at the time was completing his training contract at national outfit Hine Solicitors, was convicted at Wiltshire Magistrates Court of possession of a class A drug, cocaine, on 19 April 2018, according to a disciplinary decision published by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA).

The rookie solicitor was also convicted of driving a motor vehicle with excess alcohol and possession of a class B drug, cannabis and cannabis resin.

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The regulator’s notice states: “During his employment Mr Mawdsley attended a police station as a police station representative. While there he was breathalysed and found to be over the limit, having driven there. He also had cocaine in his possession.”

Mawdsley was just five months into his training contract when he was dismissed by the firm in January 2018. He was given a written rebuke and made the subject of a section 43 order, which prevents him from working in a law firm without prior permission from the SRA. Mawdsley was also ordered to pay costs of £600. The regulator confirmed he was not currently working for an authorised firm.

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49 Comments

Anonymous

Top bloke.

(50)(5)

Anonymous

They should start performing random drug tests on judges …

(13)(1)

Charlie

What a lad.

(0)(1)

Banterbury

What firm employed this trainee? From the facts it is likely to be one of these three: Clifford Coke, Sniffcon De Reya or White & Base.

(7)(2)

Dolly

I think it was Crackham and Watkins actually.

(0)(7)

OMG

Lest there be any doubt that (a) the LPC is too easy, and morons slip through the net; and (b) we have too many people qualifying…

(29)(16)

Anonymous

Ooh you’re hard

(27)(3)

Anonymous

You’re thinking of the wrong drug mate

(12)(1)

Realist

Firstly, what the hell has passing the LPC got to do with this story and secondly the number of people qualifying?? What a ridiculous post! Of course no other trainee has been caught with drugs etc…have they! What about the barrister who had drugs delivered to his chambers? Oh forgot bar course too easy and again too many people. The barrister I believe still practices. Ok get real, times we live in, would love to have an investigation into OMG past life. Wonder what skeletons lurk in his/her cupboards. Maybe we couldn’t get the doors closed.

(43)(4)

Realist

Nice try but not William. Did like your post though!

(3)(2)

Bob the goat manager

Random porn checks

(0)(0)

Anonymous

What a banter demon

(8)(0)

Anonymous

Archbishop of Banterbury

(3)(2)

Anonymous

Pablo Escobants

(23)(1)

Gordon

Bantersaurus Rex

Spongebob square bants

Bantanamo Bay

(9)(1)

Anonymous

Re above comment so true. I did the last year of the Law Society’s Final examination in 1993, 74% pass rate nationally. 1994 in came the LPC and the rate jumped to 98% pass rate. A girl I shared a house with failed every single LSF exam in 1993 though went on to get a distinction in the LPC in 1994. My 16 year old is in the middle of GCSE’s. I reckon they are harder than qualifying as a solicitor nowadays

(12)(26)

Anonymous

At my firm, incoming trainees get a small bonus if they get a first in their undergraduate degree or a distinction on the GDL. For the LPC though, you need to get a distinction in each and every module to get the same bonus. They need to do this to stop absolutely everyone getting the bonus, as c. 90% of my intake got an LPC distinction. It is a joke qualification.

(6)(15)

Anon

The gross incompetence and almost complete absence of a basic intellectual skill set of the majority of high street solicitors is all the proof needed to demonstrate that the LPC is too easy.

(1)(5)

Baron Smithy of Highgarden

And yet you offer no proof whatsoever.

(0)(0)

Ticked off Judge

As a High Street Solicitor and DDJ I take exception at the assertion that I have an ‘absence of a basic intellectual skill set’

(5)(0)

Ticked Off Counsel

As counsel, I take exception at having to appear in front of DDJs (criminal, not civil) who sometimes have little grasp of the law or procedural rules .

Just out of interest, why did you capitalise “High Street Solicitor”?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Oh go back to your document review, you clown.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

Hine Solicitors, the criminal’s criminal law firm. Like this comment if you know what I mean.

(15)(17)

Anonymous

Stop deleting my comments

(1)(1)

Anonymous

Make no mistake, if he’d have been a pupil barrister he’d have received a small fine and been back in the Mags representing a client on the Monday morning. The STD and BSB are polls apart.

(10)(4)

Anonymous

lel STD. Apt.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

SDT*

(1)(2)

Anonymous

SDI

(0)(0)

Anonymous

STI

(1)(0)

Anonymous

We’ve all been there. Sounds like me every time I am in Court on a Friday.

(8)(1)

Realist

Just to throw something out there for debate. Why do people in legal forums take pleasure from seeing a lawyer struck Off or barrister disbarred?

(11)(0)

Anonymous

People on legal forums are no different to people elsewhere, they just happen to be lawyers.

(2)(2)

Anonymous

Sorry but that’s wrong. Lawyers should not count as people

(3)(1)

Anonymous

You should only count as a oxygen thief.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

I take tremendous pleasure. After reading this story I could not stand up for 10 minutes.

(5)(0)

Realist

Sad!

(1)(0)

Anonymous

There are two types of people in legal forums:
1: students pretending to be lawyers who are happy at stuff like this cause it means the profession has a new opening.
2: actual lawyers who hate themselves for their horrible career choice and comfort themselves with stories of lawyers messing up and making them feel superior.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

Loads of trainees do c*ke?

(4)(3)

Anonymous

^its everywhere? Just not everyone is stupid enough to bring it to a police station

(4)(0)

Lord Coke head

Wow, what a bellend.

Having coke delivered to Chambers is one thing, showing up to advise a client drug and high in possession of coke (class A not B as the article states) is different gravy.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

Cokes good for the brain.

(2)(1)

Anonymous

Shocking for the bottom tho

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Unless the person blowing it up there is skilled at the task. But even with someone very good there is a high amount of waste with that message.

(2)(1)

Anon

I had an interview for an in-house counsel position at Hine once and I have to say that the partner who interviewed me was one of the rudest and most arrogant dickheads I have ever encountered. Greedy too, as all they were interested in was knowing whether I would take on cases which were way beyond my experience at the time (eg: asking if I would I do an attempted murder, while I was maybe only 18 months on my feet at the time), so the firm could keep both the litigation and advocacy fees.

(6)(0)

Anonymous

And the relevance to this post?

(0)(4)

Anon

@Anonymous: May 24 2019 9:38am:

Hine is the firm where the trainee was employed and I just got triggered. Years of resentment and bitterness just welled up inside me and I couldn’t keep my hands away from the keyboard. Plus, my therapist said it would help.

(14)(0)

Charlie

Partner obviously on the old Bolivian marching powder.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Loads of lawyers do coke. It is great.

(0)(0)

Me na kno

Half the profession are on drugs so what difference will it make

(0)(0)

Comments are closed.