Round-up

Best of the blogs

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6

Weekly round-up of the top legal blogosphere posts

Alexandra Wilson: “I wanted to associate Essex with barrister” [New Statesman]

Judge these books: The Secret Barrister on the best books about law [The Guardian]

Five glaring issues about the announcement of the ‘new national flagship’ prestige procurement [The Law and Policy Blog]

How Ben Crump became America’s go-to police brutality lawyer [BBC News]

This one crazy law from 1829 could topple our newly married Prime Minister [Legal Cheek]

How Ben Crump became America’s go-to police brutality lawyer [BBC News]

Legal Cheek virtual event: Secrets to Success North West — with Brabners, Exchange Chambers, Aaron & Partners, Hillyer McKeown and ULaw

The right to protest [A Lawyer Writes]

Mark Tolentino: the flamboyant lawyer embroiled in the Wirecard scandal [Financial Times]

Copyright Gunfight at the O.K. Corral: A Fistful of Dollars vs Rango before the Court of Rome [The IPKat]

Why should Dr Christian Jessen’s fans pay his legal bill? [The Spectator] (free, but registration required]

Secrets to Success North West — with Brabners, Exchange Chambers, Aaron & Partners, Hillyer McKeown and ULaw [Legal Cheek Events]

6 Comments

Anonnnnnnn

Well done Alexandra.

There have always been excellent Black students on the BPTC, both academically and in advocacy ability.

Lots of nervous filibustering by barristers about schools, diversity, scholarships, grades, squirrels and just about everything else when you remind them that their London chambers have almost no BAME barristers.

But ultimately, chambers have complete control over who to choose as pupils.

Never forget – it is a CHOICE not to take on BAME pupils.

(4)(12)

Barry

Oh look… its another victimhood post, what a rare sight. It really doesn’t ever occur to some people that perhaps, just maybe, there was someone better qualified for the already extremely, almost absurdly competitive spot?

Still its easier to blame your shortcomings on the bigotry of others than to do some self reflection I suppose.

(11)(6)

Hmmmmm

Tbh, if we were to go down the ‘better qualified’ route, all chambers would be full of Harvard STEM graduates, not ‘Mad Lads’ from English public schools.

(2)(5)

This is what you sound like

Tbh, if we were to go down the ‘better qualified’ route, all chambers would be full of genius savants with 180+IQs, at least 10 patents to their name and and idetic memory.

(6)(1)

Yeah, whatevs

Still doesn’t explain the lack of BAME barristers though.

Think the clients got wealthy by only doing business with people exactly like them?

There’s always benefits to being a little more open-minded.

Anonymous

6.07, the persuasive economic case for diversity used to support campaigns for large firms and companies does not transpose credibly into a self-employed sole trader model, and efforts to apply it have seemed strained and counter-productive. The case is and has to be more one based more on policy and moral factors, which is what the stakeholders in the profession, including the groups lobbying for changes, have tended to do.

Bar representation reflects recruitment decisions taken 10, 20, 30 or 40 years ago, which explains much of the issues with representation percentages across the Bar as a whole, which goes to your first point. It also shows that the focus of changes needs to be on representation percentages at current entry points unless you have access to the TARDIS.

At the intake stage the data are positive. BAME representation percentages at pupillage and new tenancies are above the national percentages of BAME citizens. The allocation of that percentage however does raise concerns as it tends to be in the less lucrative areas, but that is strongly a function of educational representation issues at the leading universities. Those educational representation issues are largely, and in fact almost exclusively, driven by socioeconomic discrimination. The same can be said for disparities in application success rates for pupillages, which are more a function of the institutions from which candidates are applying rather than the ethnicity of the applicants themselves, and which in turn reflect, again, the impact of socioeconomic factors on the UK’s education system.

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