Legal Cheek’s favourite undergraduate law modules that you can actually, really study

Forget land law, strategic lawyering sounds much more fun

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Law can be a pretty boring degree sometimes, especially if you find yourself studying a module you really, really hate.

To obtain a qualifying law degree, students have to study dry subjects like land law, equity and trusts, public law and tort law. But when it comes to picking optional modules, usually later on in your degree, some universities offer real corkers.

Here are 13 of Legal Cheek’s favourite undergraduate law modules, all of which are available to study at UK universities right now.

1. Strategic Lawyering

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Though Legal Cheek is pretty sure ‘lawyering’ isn’t actually a word, law students have the downright pleasure of choosing to study either Lawyering: Theory, Skills and Ethics at De Montfort University, or Strategic Lawyering at Middlesex University. We are totally jealous.

2. Terrorism

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Yep, a module at Northampton University simply called Terrorism.

3. American Legal Practice

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We don’t know what is up with the folk at Birmingham City Law School but they bloody love America. Optional LLB modules include *clears throat* American Criminal Procedure and Evidence, American Legal Practice, US Constitutional Law and American Legal Studies Dissertation. Makes City University’s dedication to all things Canada (offering modules in Canadian Constitutional Law and Canadian Corporate Law) look lacklustre in comparison.

4. The LSE Course: Understanding the Causes of Things

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We thought this was a joke at first.

All LSE undergrads, lawyers included, must study a module termed the LSE100, which is basically a jazzed up General Studies A-level. Students learn the “fundamental elements of thinking like a social scientist”, examining big questions like “how should we address poverty and inequality?” and “is nationalism a source of cohesion or conflict?” This is an actual, real core module.

5. State of Sheffield — Global Perspectives on Local Issues

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Playing a similar “look how great our uni is, let’s invent a module with our name in it” card as LSE is the University of Sheffield, whose first year lawyers study something called State of Sheffield – Global Perspectives on Local Issues. This core module aims to teach students “what it means to be a social scientist”. Yay.

6. Violence Against Children in Cyberspace

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Cyberspace-based modules are becoming more and more common in universities nowadays, but we can’t help thinking this option offered to students at the University of Liverpool is a tad specific.

7. Sex, Power and Legal Control

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Again not another module we were expecting to stumble across, but there it was in the University of Plymouth law school syllabus. Sounds a lot more interesting than contract law.

8. Propaganda

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There are all sorts of weird optional modules going on at the University of East Anglia. Final year students can do modules in — wait for it — Democracy; EU’s Future as an International Actor; Power and Society; In and Out: The Politics of Migration; or, if you fancy it, Propaganda.

9. Family Breakdown

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A dramatically titled module on offer at the University of the West of England.

10. Penology

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We shouldn’t find this funny but we do. This module is on offer at Brunel, De Montfort and the University of the West of England.

11. Animal Law and Ethics

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Over in Lincoln, students can combine their passion for the animal kingdom with their love of law and study Animal Law and Ethics. A similar course is on offer over at the University of East Anglia, but this one’s called Animal Welfare Law.

12. The Portrayal of Justice: Screen Representations of Law and Lawyers

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Though the option to take modules with weird titles usually comes later on in law school studies, this one is on offer to first year students at the University of Westminster.

13. Law School Without It No Success 1 (WINS1) and Law School Without It No Success 2 (WINS2)

*face palm*

Here’s another cracker courtesy of the University of Sheffield, which teaches compulsory modules in year one and two termed WINS1 and WINS2 respectively. These aim to support students throughout their first two years of study and while we don’t doubt the value of these modules, you have to agree the name is sort of lame.

43 Comments

Anonymous

To those who bemoan and question an ‘Oxbridge bias’ in the law. This. A thousand times, this.

(49)(9)
Anonymous

Perhaps. Although notice that premier RG law schools like UCL and KCL also don’t feature in these ‘muppet’ modules.

(17)(4)
Anonymous

RG Law School, University of Nottingham:
International Wildlife Law
Children’s Rights
Regional Human Rights Law

RG law schools have PLENTY of Micky Mouse modules.
And….surprise surprise….they are highly subscribed AND they return exceptionally high marks…

(4)(6)
Anonymous

Must point out that LSE100 doesn’t count towards our degree

(5)(1)
Anonymous

Notice an interesting common denominator for a majority of these sham courses: they are all offered at utterly shyte universities.

(19)(9)
Anonymous

I love noticing Katie’s smug tone in articles like this and then realising she never managed to bag a TC. 😂

(22)(9)
Anonymous

That’s what they all say.

This post has been moderated because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(6)(2)
Asshat

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(1)(0)
Anonymous

For anyone who wants to do transactional work in a City firm, I would have thought that American Legal Practice would have been a great optional module to take. Especially as it would assist anyone wanting to work for a US outfit in London or become dual qualified.

The rest of the modules seem to be either too general (i.e. general studies-esk) or so niche as to be pointless.

(9)(5)
Anonymous

Doing some mickey mouse module in no way compares to being dual qualified.

Loon.

(3)(6)
Anonymous

He said anyone ‘WANTING’ to become dual qualified, wasn’t comparing it. Complete buffoon.

(3)(1)
Anonymous

The woman in No. 9 has a weird left hand. Maybe her lack of a finger was the cause of family friction and breakdown.

(2)(0)
Anonymous

I think it’s her husband’s burgeoning career as a David Tennant impersonator that was the cause.

(2)(0)
Anonymous

Animal law isn’t that out there, surely? Some of them have quite ‘interesting’ titles, but we haven’t seen the content- it could be quite rigorous. FYI I am at a ‘modern shite uni’ and all the modules have traditional titles but all we have to do to pass is to write a 300 word story about how much we want to be a lawyer. Well, I made the last bit up but it’s always fun to reinforce stereotypes.

(15)(2)
Anonymous

What’s so weird about those PolSci final years modules at UEA?

Do you even think for a minute before you type up this tripe, Katie?

(11)(3)
Anonymous

Katie finds them funny because she eats Chitty and shits paragraphs on promissory estoppel.

Katie is the law.

(5)(0)
Anonymous

Other than you finding any word beginning with ‘pen’ hilarious (because you have the sense of humour of a 10 year old), Penology is not a joke module and I would venture that it’s offered at other law schools, especially ones with a criminology focus.

(7)(1)
Bitter UWE Grad

The Penolgy module at UWE isn’t called Penology anymore – they’re calling it Policing and Prisons, and it was shockingly bad.

(2)(0)
Bitter UWE Grad

*Penology. Can’t even bring myself to spell it correctly, that’s how upset I was with the quality of that module (it’s taught through UWE’s sociology department, not law).

(1)(1)
Gus the Snedger

For sex offences, prisoners should be sent to a penile colony!

(0)(0)
Anonymous

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

(2)(0)
Adam Deen

This post has been removed because it breached Legal Cheek’s comments policy.

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Anonymous

What use is “Strategic Lawyering” to a Middlesex or De Montfort grad when all their degree will lead to is a gig at the local McDonalds’?

(10)(6)
Anonymous

I’m doing the LPC with someone from de Montfort who already has a training contract, your useless opinion is dog shite

(8)(3)
Anonymous

The woman in the gif on 13 sums up what I look like reading KK’s articles

(5)(0)
Anonymous

The UEA modules, with the exception of Animal Law, are free modules from other schools within the university which have presumably been recommended or approved for law students. They’re not law modules at all. As you well know.

(5)(1)
Justinian

Of course, these are all nonsense. Students today should spend their time reading the Institutes, and learning about important things. Like Roman riparian ownership. That’s a much more productive use of time.

(13)(0)
MCW

I’ve used the ability to manumit a slave regularly during my 30 years as a Solicitor!

(2)(0)
Anonymous

Understanding the Causes of Things is the English translation of LSE’s motto…

(6)(1)
Lord Lyle of SOAS

Bien Joué Anon of 918 for noticeen ze difference between envy and jealousy. Not many Anglais can do zis. Perhaps you are French no?

One can study , even in ze riff raff unis in Angle terre, Latin and French. Combined law and French is also easy enough. For Latin and Law, you need to look around.

In SOAS one can do a BA in Law Latin and French or an LLB wiz Latin and French modules.

SOAS also has ze most variety of modules including, Chinese, Urdu, middle eastern studies etc.

Zey allow a few English in every year, but mostly ze English are not many because they cannot afford it and cannot speak English properly. But there is a combined English and Law BA.

(2)(0)
Anonymous

Sorry to burst your bubble, SheffieldGraduate, we do study these modules….. *refraining from cursing*

(1)(0)
Anonymous

State of Sheffield is not a core law module. Do your research.

(0)(0)

Comments are closed.