News

Richer law students should subsidise poorer ones with new levy, Dundee law lecturer proposes

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68

While Durham law student achieves crowdfunding success for his law degree in ONE MONTH

Debating Chamber, Scottish Parliament Building

A director at Dundee’s law school has proposed a £500 levy for law students north of the border to help support prospective students who can’t afford the fees.

Elizabeth Comerford, who runs the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice (the Scottish equivalent of the Legal Practice Course (LPC)), argues that there is a gap between the amount of loan available to students and the current fee levels (around £7-8,000 per year).

Comerford, who is also a senior lecturer, writes in her submission to the Scottish parliament’s justice committee:

“I wonder if it would be beneficial for the Scottish Government to consider making a small charge of approximately £500 per law student per year of study on a means tested basis towards LLB fees to support those prospective students who wish to undertake study but are deterred by cost.”

The committee is undertaking an inquiry into access to professional legal education, barriers to access and steps that could be taken to improve access.

A spokesperson for the Scottish parliament has told the media, however, that there were CURRENLTY no plans to take up the lecturer’s proposals.

The latest comments from across Legal Cheek

The cost of studying for a degree remains a massive political and social issue south of the border as well. Last month a parliamentary committee completed its own examination of the financial implications of student loans in England.

Some students are resorting to crowdfunding their studies. Last month, Legal Cheek reported that 20-year-old Brighton grad Ebun Azeez has taken to GoFundMe to raise the £32,000 needed to take up her place on Oxford’s prestigious BCL course.

And it has just emerged that another such student has successfully crowdfunded the £27,000 he needs for his fees.

Raphael Chinwuko, an international student from Nigeria who was in his second year at top-ranking Durham University until his funding ran out and he had to suspend his studies, has raised the £27,462 he needed to avoid deportation and complete his law degree.

Also using GoFundMe, 779 people have now pledged to contribute to his fees since he first announced his campaign as recently as the end of May. Chinwuko had a funding deadline of 21 July, when his visa was to expire.

Chinwuko said of his success: “My story is a true testimony of God’s love and grace, and I really hope it’s a SOURCE OF INSPIRATION to anyone else going through tough times… Thanks again guys ❤️❤️really! I put every one of you in my prayers and I have no doubt that God will bless you all! Now I can focus on studying for and acing my exams!”

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68 Comments

Laz from RollonFriday

I entirely approve of asking trumptwats to leave restaurants etc

Make these pricks feel unwelcome

Should to the same to Bullxxiteers here

(3)(19)

Anonymous

Communist Nigerians from Outer Space!!!

(0)(1)

Jezza =C=

I am Jeremy Corbyn and I approve this message.

(0)(1)

loljkm8

Lol, try living in Ox/Cambs on the measly loans on offer for anyone coming from a household earning £45k+; London cost of living but same loan value as those in Bradford…

GG.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

Oxbridge mostly live in halls which are subsidised accom and food etc

(5)(4)

loljkm8

Yes, which comes at a cost still higher than the measly ~£3k loan plus adding in the fact that, unless given permission, you can’t have a part-time job whilst studying, you’re still out of pocket.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

You’d have the same costs (actually higher as you’ll be on the open rental market) at any other university, unless your solution is to literally make yourself homeless.
I guess judge hobosexual can always do with a new buddy, law student hobosexual

(0)(2)

Anonymous

Be my bundy?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Please don’t post this rubbish. Those of us from less well off backgrounds are usually better off at Ox/ Cam due to the fantastic university and college support.

(5)(0)

Anonymous

Absolute rubbish. I was actually much better off financially going to Oxford because extra bursaries were available at both university and college level, accommodation at my college was cheap, and I did some babysitting for a wealthy family on the side (without permission, shock horror).

(7)(0)

Common Law, Common Sense

That’s almost exactly what the f*cking person above you said, you nitwit.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Maybe the university directors should take a pay cut.

(11)(0)

Anonymous

Why not just ask the poor students to crowdfund their tuition fees? They seem to be giving money away nowadays.

Really, it should only be the international students that pay a levy on top of their tuition fees. They have the money to come here and take university places (inflating the value of a degree) but then many of them leave after graduation (meaning the UK itself does not ultimately benefit from educating them) or they end up getting selected for jobs ahead of domestic graduates.

(39)(8)

International student

I had to perform consistently to be awarded a 100% scholarship to study here. You make it sound like we’re all millionaires.

(9)(5)

Anonymous

For international students, there are very few scholarships in any given uni which cover 100% (or even 50%) of your tuition fees so the vast majority are quite likely to have a high standard of living. I never said anything which insinuated millionaires at all. If you can’t afford to study abroad but decide to take on that huge financial burden anyway, that’s your fault.

If such a levy is going to happen (which I believe is a misguided attempt at a genuine problem), it’s only fair that non-scholarship international students should shoulder most of the burden for many reasons.

(2)(2)

Anonymous

“If you cant afford to study at uni but choose to do so anyway, that is your fault.”

Fixt

(5)(2)

Intl Student

You make it sound like international students are a bad thing, or even like they are not contributing enough already. This “levy” essentially has already been taken upon by international students, we pay literally at least twice of domestic students pay for AND we do not get the benefit of ‘taking a loan’ — we have to pay outright (which is fair enough.) But essentially other than getting £9k in investment which may or may not be paid back by a home student, the goverment/university etc gets £18k in tuition fees alone as expendable money. We are already subsidising home students’ education. And I’m pretty sure a lot of Intl Students would love to stay and work in the UK if given the chance, but with the whole Brexit debacle and the “they are taking our jobs” argument it is getting harder for international students to just STAY and contribute to UK’s economy unless they are very competitive (which then again, fair play). But you seem to suggest that international students are scrounging off the country which in my opinion is far from the truth.

Literally all they have to do is manage their money better to ensure there is a pool of money dedicated for those more in need, rather than just increasing the cost of international students which may just drive them away to other European countries. Education is still an export in this sense, and the UK will still need to maintain competitive prices that is proportionate to its competitive prestige in comparison to its other worldly counterparts.

(12)(15)

Intl Student

Also we have to pay for the NHS when applying for a visa (£150 a year, proposed to raise to £300 a year – even if we do not use it at all), and our visa only lasts us 3 months after we graduate before we HAVE to leave the country (not a lot of time to look for a job in the country?)

(4)(1)

Anonymous

Leave as a student is not an automatic route to settlement in the UK. You knew this when you arrived.

(4)(2)

Intl student

Of course, i’m not saying it should be — just arguing the rationale that was more or less implied by anon that intl students are bad bc “they dont even stay in the UK afterwards” as though that is 100% our choice

(3)(1)

Intl Student

You make it sound like international students are a bad thing, or even like they are not contributing enough already. This “levy” essentially has already been taken upon by international students, we pay literally at least twice of domestic students pay for AND we do not get the benefit of ‘taking a loan’ — we have to pay outright (which is fair enough.) But essentially other than getting £9k in investment which may or may not be paid back by a home student, the goverment/university etc gets £18k in tuition fees alone as expendable money. We are already subsidising home students’ education. And I’m pretty sure a lot of Intl Students would love to stay and work in the UK if given the chance, but with the whole Brexit debacle and the “they are taking our jobs” argument it is getting harder for international students to just STAY and contribute to UK’s economy unless they are very competitive (which then again, fair play). But you seem to suggest that international students are scrounging off the country which in my opinion is far from the truth.

Literally all they have to do is manage their money better to ensure there is a pool of money dedicated for those more in need, rather than just increasing the cost of international students which may just drive them away to other European countries. Education is still an export in this sense, and the UK will still need to maintain competitive prices that is proportionate to its competitive prestige in comparison to its other worldly counterparts.

(0)(1)

A trust fund with a trust fund

You literally use money your robber baron parents stole from the Russian, Chinese, arab people to steal a university place from a British working class person. And for what? So that it looks a tiny bit more legitimate when you go back to your home country and carry on your parents’ dirty work, only with a shiny Oxbridge degree?

(6)(8)

Anonymous

Funny, because im an international student and my parents came from nothing. Nothing — and not in terms of “welfare states” like the UK where thankfully you guys free healthcare and free schooling to always lean back on, but nothing. After my grandfather died and my grandmother had to raise 6 kids alone selling food in a village with no electricity or clean water whatsoever, and the only source of healthcare was an american aid helicopter that came every month. Income was defo less than $1.25/person and with no state security to fall abck on. my grandmother sold everything and worked tears &blood to somehow manage to get my dad in the expense of my aunts’ education (and in the middle of a regional war at that), who had to help her work until my dad could start earning money he could send back home. He lived on literally an egg a day. That sort of nothing. Now he earns enough to be able to send me to university abroad. Stop thinking that you deserve everything in life like handouts and actually work to get somewhere so that you and generations after you can reap what you sow — blaming intl students for your own govs inability to fix national inequality or for the laziness of SOME (emphasis on some) who jusf expect everything to be given to them on a platter just because they have had a “hard life” isnt gna solve any of ur problems. Ps: aint stealing if u pay for it w good consideration

(3)(2)

A trust fund with a trust fund

Yeah, yeah. Guagua Bo’s dad ‘came from nothing’ as well, somehow sending his son to Harrow and multiple Ivy League grad programs on a humble Chinese civil servant’s salary.
Almost like income in the western sense isn’t how BRIC robber barons get rich.
(Btw I encourage anyone who’s curious to google ‘guagua bo father oxford’ for some instructive reading)

(2)(2)

A trust fund with a trust fund

I said BRIC but tbf it’s a China, Russia, east euro, Arab world thing.
India doesn’t really have the same kind of privatisation plundering, and I don’t really know about Brazil but I don’t think it does

(2)(0)

Anonymous

I love the way Legal Cheek always has boring as fuck articles and yet the comments section shows moments of brilliance, insight, and humour.

(1)(0)

A trust fund with a trust fund

Also FYI I’m not native English. My dad made enough money in one of the places I’ve referred to to send me to school and university (oxford init) in the West.
I wouldnt regard myself as anything other than privileged save maybe the fact I had to do my secondary education in my second language. I also wouldn’t dream of going back to the home country, where my degree would be legitimating cover for some second generation robber baron to keep the family ‘business’ going.
So fuck off, third culture kid. No one cares how poor the country you’re from is – all it ever meant for you is that your parents could get themselves a maid (or 10?) dirt cheap

(1)(0)

Intl student

Understand where youre coming from but you imply that all successfull businesses are corrupt, and have “stolen from the people.” ??? By this definition no one in your eyes can work and gain lots of money legitimately because once they have passed a certain threshold of wealth then they MUST be corrupt, even if they dont work in a public sector (eg your gaogao example), even if they have invested their lifes in multiple areas of business. Harsh generalisation ngl. (Also i go to one if the lower ranked russel group unis and defo not oxbridge, and not from a Bric country, and not in a million years are my family millionaires. As I said, parents earning JUST ENOUGH to send me abroad. My education abroad had been a strain on them financially as well, albeit manageable. I’m telling you this bc there seems to be an assumption that I’m some rich heir/heiress living on a castle somewhere 🤷🏻‍♀️, i wish lol)

(0)(0)

A trust fund with a trust fund

Go home, Boris, you’ve had enough vodka.
Do you really need a Law degree to buy a state oil plant in a fixed auction your silovik daddy organised?

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Harsh but, for the most part, true. (There are exceptions, however, and these should be treated respectfully.)

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Why not use the ample scholarships and grants which are almost all based on means testing not merit.

(1)(1)

Anonymous

Not sure that you can say there are ‘ample’ scholarships and grants – there are some extra grants going around at Oxbridge but I’ve never seen any full scholarships anywhere?

(0)(0)

K&E Manager

any1 earning over 30k should have a 90% income tax imposed on them

(7)(11)

Anonymous

K&E “Manager”. LOL

(4)(0)

Anonymous

And how does that catch the trust fund babies, exactly? You sound like a typical elite socialist who wants to keep all the plebs in their place by never allowing them to generate capital.

(1)(0)

Anonymous

What a stupid idea. Adding a fee based on income would be, argubly, a form of discrimination. Tax is one thing, but to increase the price of a service or product based on how much someone earns is unlawful.

Moreover, it is not the students whom have the high incomes but the parents. That is how many people between 18-23 can actually afford a law degree or the lpc/bptc? Without a loan, winning the lottery or wealthy parents, the answer is none!

One last point: we are all in the same boat, I have £40k in student loans. Why should one group not have to pay their way in life? I am from a normal middle class family and my parents did not pay for my courses. I never begged for money. I worked part time and got loans for the rest. I am not a special case, all my friends were in the same situation. They all have £30-50k worth of loans, regardless of the worth of their parents.

On an unrelated point, has anyone else looked at the crowd funding (and other wbesites) pages of those begging for money? Noticed how almost all of them have trouble cvs. People are giving money away to students who have no real chance of success (unless they completely change, which is unlikely). Begging for money because you worked hard once or have an emotional story doesn’t mean you deserve anything. Likewise saying you are a minority and suffer discrimination, which is very unlikely to be true given the laws in the UK, still doesn’t mean other people should pay for you. Meritocracy is what we have in the UK, if you are good enough you will get founding,otherwise it means you are sh1t and should look at an alternative career path. Not a nice thing to say, but it’s true.

(17)(2)

Demos, C.

“Meritocracy is what we have in the UK, if you are good enough you will get founding, otherwise it means you are sh1t and should look at an alternative career path. Not a nice thing to say, but it’s true.”

I don’t care whether if it was a wrong thing to say or not a nice thing to say by you.

I would prefer you showed some reasoning skills. You are a middle class person who seems to have little in the way of cognitive skills if you think there is a meritocracy in England/ the UK, whether you think meritocracy is correlated with an assumption of funding.

Have you heard of this word, ‘anecdotal.’ Have heard of these ones, ‘commercial reality.’ It’s like debating with children.

(0)(14)

Anonymous

Just so you know: whether and if mean the same.

‘If I fail I will still gain’
‘Whether I fail or not I will still gain’

Funding is intrinsic to your attainment level, which then reflects in terms of the meritocracy inherent in the UK educational and professional structures. This means, providing you do well on GCSEs and A-Levels you will attain funding for your degree; if you do well on your degree, you are likely to achieve funding for a masters degree or professional qualification; finally, whether you have done well up to this point, will be reflected in a well or poor paying career. This is meritocracy.

The key contention of my first post, which you replied to, is that it is unjust and illegal to apply additional fees to students whom come from wealthy families. Given, if you are an able student you should have attained funding or the risk of a student loan is no longer a risk to worry about. Moreover, few if any students aged between 18-23 (maybe even up to 25) may afford self funding for university, the fees are arduous: 9k x 3 years (university fees) and 5-10k x 3 years (living costs). Why try and pretend this is not the case for a good 99 percent of students in the UK? As I said, we are all in the same boat, grow a pair and get on with your life. Stop complaining like you or anyone else is special.

Last point for my rebuttal: you have not provided evidence for your statements. That is what children do, make up statements with no logical or evidential base. It is fact that most current students will finish university with between 40-50k worth of student loans, regardless of family wealth. Further, any study on meritocracy within the UK undertaken in the last 20 years will show that the uk has a meritocratic structure for both its education and professional systems. You work hard and do well, you will be paid more.

(5)(0)

Demos, C.

Now here’s the reality

Below is part of my bibliography for an essay I wrote on social class and education, but especially exams. I covered the elite institutions and their obsession with public exams. I make reference to degrees including law being ‘plastic 2.1 degrees and ‘glass ceilings.’ In other words the final classification of degrees including the LLB is merely smoke and mirrors. In any event employers demand at least 2.1. The universities simply, in terms of law avoid exams or apportion lower weight to them in years 2 and 3, and the LLBs which employ equal weighting in examinations, ie 100% exams and 100% coursework are more likely to affect lower social class candidates. Society is simply being run like a McDonalds (cheap, fast, efficient, see Ritzer G’s earlier work). I conclude examinations are an impediment for lower social class whether, GCSE, A-level, entry to Eton (scholarship) or entry to Oxbridge. I also conclude examinations are ‘normal’ (see Bauman, Z.). I conclude that the lower social class are worse off in universities that have exams in years 2 and 3 disproportionately with other universities. I conclude that the UK students are part of a debt or ‘credit’ generation (Ritzer, G. 2005, naively accept it unlike the US comparators who are more alert to the problems debts pose. It is especially worse for LLBs. It is by and large a consumer generation, in this Capitalist country, with winners and losers. Yet not of it is really based on meritocracy – that is just the illusion (perhaps just to keep the economy going). NB: I am apparently a lateral thinker according to my former Oxbridge educated law tutor (criminal law in practice).

“Articles

Benn, M. (5.6.18), Guardian news report:
‘Grammar schools: Even the BBC is waking up to the painful, divisive reality,’ https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/jun/05/grammar-schools-bbc-documentary-divisive

Bridges, P.; Cooper, A.; Evanson, P.; C. Haines, C.; D Jenkins, D. Scurry, H. Woolf and M. Yorke, (2002), “Coursework marks high, examination marks low: discuss”, Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, Vol 27, No 1

Brown, P., 2003: The Opportunity Trap: education and employment in a global economy. Journal accessed from http://www.swets.com on the 10.4.07

Connelly, R. (2013), Social Stratification and Education: Case Studies Analysing Social Survey Data. Thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, School of Applied Social Science. University of Stirling

Domhoff, W. G. (2006). Who rules America? Power and politics in the year
2006, 3rd Edition. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing. (pp. 71 – 123).
Chapter 3 The Corporate Community and the Upper Class

Furlong, A & Cartmel F (2007); Young People & Social Change: New Perspective. Maidenhead, Open University Press

Gayle, V & Play ford, C 2014, The concealed middle? An exploration of ordinary young people and school GCSE subject area attainment ESRC Centre for Population Change Working Paper, Southampton, pp. 1-35

Leathwood, C (2004): A Critique of Institutional Inequalities in Higher Education.
Electronic journal: accessed on 14.3.07 from http://www.swetswise.com

Lukes, S (1986): Durkheim on Politics & the State, Edited by Anthony Giddens. Stanford University Press, California

K. Philips (2016), LEADING PEOPLE 2016, The educational backgrounds of the UK professional elite

Marsh, I & Keating, M. (2006): Making Sense of Society (2006). Edited by Marsh, I & Keating, M., Pearson Education Limited, Essex, England

McDonald, C. (2016), Take the test that reveals how you perceive time: Study reveals our brain often gets it wrong, http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3688988/Is-perception-time-wrong-Study-finds-humans-perceive-time-expectation-reality

Mills C W (1959) Sociological Imagination: Social Theory: The Multicultural & Classic Readings. Edited by Lemert, C (1993), U.S.A, Westview Press

Randle, W. N. (1975), ‘GROWTH OF THE MODERN UNIVERSITY AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SOCIOLOGY OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES,’ Phd Thesis

Rhodes, D. (2015), Bayesian Time Perception

Ritzer, G. (2005), ‘CREDIT CARDS AND THE GLOBALIZATION OF NOTHING’ Saint Louis University Public Law Review Symposium Articles, Copyright (c) 2005 St. Louis University School of Law; George Ritzer

Rolfe, H. & Tracy Anderson, T. (2010), A firm choice: Law firms’ preferences in the recruitment of trainee solicitors, International Journal of the Legal Profession, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, London, UK

Simpson, Adrian (2016) ‘Assessment and its outcomes: the influence of disciplines and institutions.’

Telling, K. (2017), ‘Selling the liberal arts degree in England: unique students, generic skills and mass higher education.’ University of Manchester, UK. Website http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/73056/1/Deanonymised%20manuscript%2C%20Sociology.pdf

Walker, I and Zhu, Y (2013), The impact of university degrees on the lifecycle of earnings: some further analysis. Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) Research Paper No. 112, available at: http://www.gov.uk/government/publications/university-degrees-impact-onlifecycle-of-earnings http://heer.qaa.ac.uk Reference number: HEER000341

Weber, M. (1922), Economics and Society, volume 1

Interesting sites/ other:

Sutton Trust on the Elite

‘SUTTON TRUST BRIEFING NOTE: THE EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUNDS OF
THE UK’S TOP SOLICITORS, BARRISTERS AND JUDGES:’

http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/30380/1/Comparison_educational_backgrounds-1.pdf

‘The Educational Backgrounds of Members of the House of Commons and House of Lords:’

https://www.suttontrust.com/wp-content/uploads/2005/12/PoliticiansBackgrounds_09-Dec-05.pdf

Independent Schools GCSE/ A-levels results

Eton College:

GCSEs:
https://www.etoncollege.com/userfiles/files/Fianl%20Summer%202017%20GCSE%20Statistics.pdf Accessed in May 2018

A-levels: https://www.etoncollege.com/userfiles/files/Final%20Summer%202017%20GCE%20Statistics.pdf (Accessed as above)

Chelsea Ladies College:

https://www.cheltladiescollege.org/assets/Academic/GCSE-Results-Summary-2017.pdf (Accessed as above)”

(0)(4)

Bugger the fug

Nice Bro reminds me of the time I f***! Your mum.

Oh wait I guess that didn’t happy either. Umm a bit like your life. But I know I t bagged your dad.

(2)(0)

Demos, C.

I provided a bibliography for my essay on education and social class. It is not letting me post it.

(0)(3)

Demos, C.

It has been sent to Graduate Awards.

(0)(4)

Anonymous

Best module grade sir?

(2)(0)

Anonymous

Where do you study? Really want to know please.

Looking for a good university but do not want to end up at the same place as you!

(5)(0)

Demos, C.

Argue your points based on sound reasoning – not ad hominem or non sequitur. Like I said it’s like debating with petulant children – who have zero intelligence and zero reasoning ability. Argue with the essay’s presumptions – not the author, dickhead!

(0)(2)

Demos, C.

A form of discrimination?

What do you call the law being hijacked by the upper middle class and the upper class for simply centuries.

Unlawful – try defining unlawful. These universities have sold law students a pup. 9k each year for a law degree, when let’s face it the foundations could be completed in 2 years. The problem is many of them wouldn’t pass the exams at level 5 but especially level 6. So, the universities to get bums on seats make the LLB – DIY – Online degrees. Pay as you Go.

2.5 trillion economy but who benefits is the question.

(1)(12)

s.32 Salmon Act 1986

“Unlawful – try defining unlawful.”

Literally in breach of the law.

(8)(0)

Anonymous

It’s ok, it’s obviously a first year law student with a “critical law” module or two.

(4)(0)

Demos, C.

No, my last module was property law, my module before that including property law other than land law, ie commercial transactions.

(0)(1)

Demos, C.

Unlawful would likely to be without law, a breach of existing law, or illegal in the public law sense.

(0)(1)

Token

You are now my favourite commentator on here. LOL! SO FUNNY.

Google the Equality Act 2010 uk, you will see why it would be a form of discrimination to apply additional fees to students based on their wealth. Also as others have suggested, most students are not wealthy, it is their parents. So who would pay these fees? No one haha.

(3)(0)

Demos, C.

The Equality Act 2010 (‘EA 2010’) is EU inspired ie ‘principle of proportionality’ and ‘legitimate aim’ – ie EU law (and ECHR (‘Human Rights’)).

The EA only offers provision for protected characteristics. It affords ‘reasonable adjustments’ also; so how in your view does a student loan act in its application or effect, a ‘discrimination’ based on wealth?

(0)(3)

Anonymous

It would be far more equitable if wealthy law lecturers from dodgy places of learning subsidised their pitiful students out of their own pocket.

Come on Elizabeth Comerford, cough up.

(5)(0)

Anonymous

If they did this in Oxford and Cambridge the 1% poor students would live like kings.

I highly approve.

(2)(1)

Anonymous

This idea sucks on all levels. How about mandatory professional courses like the BPTC, LPC, and Scottish equivalent are designed, delivered, and subsidized by the regulatory bodies they are meant to appease. Stop the for-profit private delivery. There’s even an argument to get some government funds in there.

Access to legal representation is a fundamental right, and for that right to be available legal professionals need to be trained and qualified. Step up, Tories! Definitely grasping there, but the system needs help.

(4)(1)

Demos, C.

Try telling the family courts that after they have made social engineering and ‘legal’ transplants, taking usually at least babies or young children from poor lower social class parents to middle class (bourgeois) parents, and having transferring title (legal ownership) from the former to latter respectively. Legal aid suffered a massive hit under the ’empty heads’ Tory government. It is always the worse off who are affected and the immediate above individuals/ family are no exception.

(0)(1)

Common Law, Common Sense

No one has “title (legal ownership” over a person, f*ckwit. Go back to your contract books; second year is going to bite you in the ass.

(0)(0)

Common Law, Common Sense

YAS KWEEN.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

Brothers! Sisters!

We need socialism!

Vote for Jeremy Corbyn to tax this greed and redistribute high incomes over £30k to the poor!

Land tax now!

(0)(1)

Anonymous

The very idea people should not collect worth is interesting, answer my question: if you benefit from a socialist policy, either because you are poor or come from a minority background, once you aquire wealth will you also share it out?

Situation:
I am black and my parents only earn 24,000 each year. I get funding from university because I am poor and black, then I get my lpc or bptc paid for by crowed funding. I don’t work that hard but I get a job and do well. I earn 40/50,000 a year aged 30-35 which will increase as I get older. Will I still support policies and laws that require the wealthy to pay high tax? Will I still believe I am discriminated against as I am black? Will I tell people I never paid my way in life? Will I be happy to pay an additional fee (as suggested in this article) for my children to go to university as I am wealthy now?

I don’t think so. But if you don’t agree tell me.

(4)(0)

Demos, C.

When you take children from lower social class backgrounds through even grammar school education from mainstream, there is a strong likelihood that they would end up right wing owing to ‘education’ and different cultures. No one really chooses politics their brand of politics is chosen for them based on the variables and stimuli of the environment they become socialised in. Children are a product of their environment in short. Look at Gove for example. Taken from lower social class environments and now out of touch with their lower social class peers.

If a person gets on in life – by having social capital, educational capital, cultural capital (the 3 Cs, see Bourdieu for ‘lifestyle’) – there is a strong likelihood the final result is a different social class and therefore social closure will be in effect.

(0)(4)

Anonymous

The reason we end up “right wing” is that we see how leftist movements have been a vehicle for the privileged minority: they increase government spending and debt so that the moneylenders can continue their predation on the working people; they open the borders to force down wages and remove any leverage the working people might have (i.e. to withdraw their labour).

Find out who financed the revolution in Russia.

Go on – just conducting that tiny act of self-education will pay greater dividends for your understanding than a hundred-and-one bs uni history or politics courses.

(0)(0)

Common Law, Common Sense

“If a person gets on in life – by having social capital, educational capital, cultural capital (the 3 Cs, see Bourdieu for ‘lifestyle’)…”

Do you form all your opinions based one lone sources? Honestly, you sound so naïve and it’s hilarious. And who are you writing to? This isn’t an essay.

I also don’t find any material relating to Bourdieu’s “3 Cs” including “social capital, educational capital, cultural capital”. Only the three types of capital itself (economic, social and cultural) and the three types of cultural capital (embodied, objectified, and institutionalised) (thanks, Wikipedia).

On a side note, you keep using the phrase “lower social class” but haven’t made clear what you mean by that – and we know how important definitions are to you, and how juvenile it is to debate without setting clear parameters. It sounds as though, from context, you are using it as a proxy for “(socio)economically deprived/disadvantaged” or simply a byword for “poor”. What exactly is feeding into that label? Because while he may not have come from money, I guarantee that Gove was always a twat (and had whatever “cultural capital” he has now back when he started at Oxford; it will be what got him in in the first place).

In short, 58%. Could do better. Keep reaching for that 2:1!

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Anonymous

Nothing like a bit of class war to get the comments flowing lads

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Anonymous

Retard alart!

People like you should not be allowed near a computer or other device for communicating.

Post your essay otherwise you are talking sh1t. I had a friend in university who attained 87 on his dissertation and his English and references were 10 times yours. With the way you write I cannot see you getting above 65… and that is only if a lecturer feels sorry for you.

By suggesting something, like me saying you are a butt queen, does not make it true. The uk is a meritocracy, the best get the best. If you cannot accept that fine.

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Demos, C.

Listen ad hominem/ non sequitur person, all my scores in all my subjects were ‘at least’ 2.1/ B Grade. My subjects include law, psychology and sociology. I was providing a summary in real time. I am however dyslexic but I still get at least good grades. if you don’t like reality go and live in another country.

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Anonymous

We don’t want these badly educated, chippy people from state schools and non-Oxbridge universities in the legal profession. It’s all very well that unintelligent, lower class people want to become lawyers but there is more at stake here than career aspiration, namely the administration of justice. The public deserve the brightest, best educated and most polished people to represent them, and those people come from the public schools and Oxbridge.

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Anonymous

Oppidan

Is that you above. Tell us about your Christianity…cock wobble.

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