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Linklaters launches undergrad sponsorship for low-income students

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£6,000 grant and work experience up for grabs

Up to nine students from socially or economically less advantaged backgrounds will be offered mentoring and financial support as part of a programme with magic circle firm, Linklaters.

As part of the firm’s social mobility initiative, Making Links, students who are either in their first year of a three-year course or in their second year of a four-year course and who fulfil the criteria can apply to the scheme.

The firm’s Making Links Scholars scheme as it is known will offer one-to-one mentoring, one week of work experience and up to £6,000 as a contribution towards fees and living costs to each student.

Alison Wilson is a graduate recruitment partner at Linklaters. She said: “We need to do our bit to level the playing field so that we can make a proper assessment of talent, potential and levels of application and determination”.

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One of the motivations behind the scheme, which starts this summer, is, says Wilson, to offer: “The kind of access and support that many entering our industry may have had naturally through family or other support networks.”

A similar scheme was set up at Pinsent Masons last year. The Kirk Murdoch Memorial Fund, set up in memory of a Pinsent Mason’s former chairman, offers financial support, professional mentoring, vac scheme placements and the opportunity to take up a training contract at Pinsent Masons to students from less advantaged backgrounds.

Employer-led social mobility initiatives are now being highlighted as part of charity, the Social Mobility Foundation’s annual Employer Index. Fourteen law firms appeared on the 2018 index with Linklaters in 11th place.

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42 Comments

Anonymous

That’s nice actually. Good move & well done!

(26)(0)

Kirkland NQ

Unless you have to mix with the underclass. Urgh. I stick to the office, my Chelsea townhouse, the first class lounge at Heathrow and my local wine bar so I don’t need to see “normal” people.

(5)(12)

Anonymous

2/10, try harder

(9)(5)

Kirkland Equity Partner

Hush now and bill harder gimp or I’ll smash you with my vascular PE.

(8)(2)

Kirkland NQ

Sorry, I’m not into you. I’ve told you before. I get that my boyish good looks can turn even the straightest of men, but I’m into women, specifically, models from former Soviet states.

(0)(0)

Anonymous

LLL

Anonymous

Get back to your textbooks fresher, this schtick won’t get you a 2:1 on your Public Law exam next week.

Kirkland NQ

If by textbooks you mean the SPA of a multi billion dollar PE deal, rest assured I’m back at it. In fact, I’m schooling the lawyers on the other side on loudspeaker while sipping on a large glass of Chateau Latour Grand Vin in my hot tub as we speak.

Anonymous

Lmao SPA yeh sure

Kirkland NQ

Such jealousy. I don’t understand why instead of being negative people here don’t just work hard and then maybe you too could be jetting off to Monaco to join your super yacht for the summer season.

Anonymous

1. slaughters is doing their thing with upReach, not mentioned, bad journalism here LC
2. thanks for making the competition worse now

(3)(10)

Anonymous

I’d want another three noughts on that to work in London it’s now the biggest dump city in the UK

(1)(6)

Anonymous

Yeah better off in DWF Oldham office churning motor claims cases. Top top quality of life.

(18)(1)

Anonymous

What a snobbish comment. It makes me genuinely nervous that you and people like you will likely be making recruitment decisions one day and still cling on to those bullshit, parochial views.

(3)(9)

Anonymous

Nah, salaries aren’t going up in the regions – living costs are. Mugs game.

(13)(1)

Anonymagic

Genuine question: how is Linklaters viewed nowadays?

What is the quality of work and tasks that a junior or NQ would be expected to undertake in some of their departments?

Very curious about the firm, they have, more in the past, been very highly regarded for both finance and corporate work – something which other MC firms did not quite share at the same level.

(4)(0)

Anonymous

Why go to Links when you can go US. Beta move.

(3)(5)

Anonymous

“Genuine question: how is Linklaters viewed nowadays?”

Still top of the market for corporate and finance. Disputes is a bit of a joke still compared to FBD and HSF.

“What is the quality of work and tasks that a junior or NQ would be expected to undertake in some of their departments?”

Massive variation depending on team, principal and what’s going on. You will do crap work. You will do some good work too. This is the same for every firm – a career in law involves doing lots of extremely dull stuff with highlights of drafting, advising clients, and negotiating with other parties. Trainee work at best will include drafting, legal research, and email advice to clients. At worst it will be document review, proofreading and printing. This is true literally everywhere.

US firms tend to just throw their trainees in and don’t have much formal training. Linklaters – like all of the MC – have strong formal training programmes which continue throughout your career and give you a huge advantage over US trained lawyers who are very hit and miss. I regularly come up against US associates who don’t understand the basics but are very confident in their abilities. This is probably reflective of your average American lawyer who is incapable of drafting anything properly but considers themselves inherently superior to anyone who isn’t an American lawyer.

Despite the comments that will inevitably come, I would only consider Latham over an MC firm for a TC as they are generally excellent and actually train people properly. Other US firms don’t have enough trainees to develop a proper program (Weil, Skadden etc) or are just generally miserable places to work (White and Case, Kirkland etc).

(20)(1)

Kirkland NQ

Miserable? At least I’ll be crying in my Lambo.

(3)(8)

Anonymous

Piss off

(4)(0)

Kirkland NQ

Wow, so much hate and jealousy. I can’t help that I am blessed with a devastating combination of looks, whit and intelligence and the ability to score 36 goals in 24 games for Manchester United under 15s as well as smash any given PE deal known to man.

Whitty Wits

Wit is most certainly not one of your strengths. Then again, neither is spelling.

A first year LLB at a former polytechnic, I assume? Or just a Johnny Foreigner who speaks English as a second language?

Anonymous

Latham will beast you just as much as W&C or Kirkland, it’s just a much nicer atmosphere to be beasted in.

(7)(0)

Anonymous

Yes that’s what I meant. You can get beasted anywhere so you might as well avoid being beasted by arseholes.

(2)(1)

Anonymous

What is the beasting at Kirkland like? Also, what is the actual salary of a salaried partner? The 6PQE Partner track seems too good to be true.

Anonymous

Fired?

Anonymous

Managed-out, told to go elsewhere.

Anonymous

You have 3-4 years as a NSP there. if lucky, you’ll springboard into another partner role somewhere else – e.g. at US firm starting out or a UK shop. Otherwise you’re back to senior associate/counsel and crossing your fingers.

Kirkland 1PQE

Meanwhile I’m driving in my new Lambo, dusting off the dashboard with finest Bolivian marching powder, Head of KKR on loudspeaker, smashing deals more deals so many deals, hooker’s head between my legs I’m loosing consciousness big PE deals so good can’t stop me wheeling and dealing yeah baby

(19)(1)

CMS 4th Seat Trainee

What do you pay your paralegals and how do you apply?

(0)(0)

Anonymous

More like doing due diligence until your eyes bleed and spending all your salary on rent so you live close enough to your office to give yourself an extra half hour’s sleep. No one lasts more than 3 years there. The PE team is burn.

(12)(0)

Rachel Zane

Are Kirkland hiring?

(1)(0)

YEAH BABY YEAH

Why did I read this in the voice of Austin Powers?

(3)(0)

Anonymous

I getting tired of all this pandering and virtue signalling. I was appalled by what Oxford said yesterday. Those who can will make it wherever the come from. Those that can’t make excuses.

(13)(1)

Anonymous

So why does anyone pay for private education if you’d have made it without it?

(3)(3)

Anonymous

Straw man. The issue is whether those from the lower classes with ability could make it.

(6)(4)

Anonymous

I pay for private education so my little darlings do not have friends whose parents are grubby oiks.

(2)(1)

Anonymous

Former Oxbridge student here who studied a course with a tiny cohort.

There was lots of ‘reverse snobbery’ from people who assumed that if you went to a private school/weren’t from the North, you were a fair target for bitchy comments because you must necessarily be ‘spoilt’. Nevermind that I worked for most of my Gap Year.

The two people on my course who were accepted through the Special Access Scheme and who spent most of their time moaning about the place without getting involved in any sports/societies were the only ones to get 2:2 degrees.

You can push people to fill quotas and ideology. But you ultimately do them a disservice if you place that ideology above people’s ability to cope with what the place demands and their willingness to muck in.

Mentality is everything.

(5)(4)

Anonymous

The lower classes have poorer self control.

(4)(3)

Anonymous

I should add that I felt the colleges really did all they could to help. One of the 2:2 students had been sexually harassed by a teacher during Sixth Form, and thus her college were happy to ensure she didn’t have one-on-one tutorials with male academics. They even arranged counselling. This was years before ‘trigger warnings’ and well beyond what most universities and colleges would have done in the same circumstances. But if people aren’t willing to help themselves on some level, nothing anyone else can do will change things.

Another person on the course went to a school that had only sent two students to Oxbridge in the past decade. She didn’t have a chip on her shoulder and was well-liked by people because she made an effort with others and enjoyed her time at Oxbridge because she bothered to open a book.

I’m skeptical of quotas and access schemes because I’ve seen first hand that they can’t fix internal issues. A 25% target for Oxford is going to lead to a fair amount of unhappy people who will ultimately waste the opportunities there.

(1)(2)

Anonymous

I remember the ones that resolutely avoided anything that involved black tie and sat in the college bar playing darts and drinking too much beer. Miserable bunch of Mancs and generic Northern clichés.

Slightly not rich kid

Piddle off, I had 3 grand a year student loan that didn’t even cover my rent with no financial parental support.

My unloved orphan best friend was on like 30k per year, he did a music tech degree and will likely never make that much or repay his loan.

Poor student get enough support, let’s be honest.

(0)(1)

Comments are closed.

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