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ULaw secures GDL and LPC training deal with national law firm TLT

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Outfit takes on around 15 trainees each year

The University of Law (ULaw) has put pen to paper on a deal to provide legal training for future trainees at TLT.

The tie-up will see ULaw become the exclusive training provider of the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) and Legal Practice Course (LPC) for TLT, a national law firm that recruits around 15 trainee solicitors each year.

Under the new arrangement, which kicks in this month, ULaw will also supply the Professional Skills Course (PSC) — the final, compulsory part of training before qualifying as a solicitor.

Commenting on the deal, Peter Crisp, pro vice chancellor external at ULaw, said:

“The practice of law and the role of lawyers is changing rapidly, and the training of future lawyers needs to reflect this new dynamic, not least as we prepare for the introduction of the SQE. The University of Law’s partnership with TLT will see us providing the GDL, LPC and PSC for all of the firm’s future legal talent.”

The Legal Cheek LPC Most List

Ed Fiddick, training principal at TLT, added: “We were impressed by ULaw’s forward thinking approach and in particular the coverage of legaltech on its programmes. Our trainees will be introduced to the application of legaltech on the LPC. ULaw also has an innovative Legal Tech module as part of its PSC offering: ideal preparation for a role supporting TLT’s objective to remain at the forefront of innovation in the legal sector.”

The 2020 Legal Cheek Firms Most List shows that TLT pays its London trainees £37,000 in year one, rising to £39,500 in year two, while in Bristol (where the firm is headquartered) they receive £31,000 and £33,000 respectively. Its newly qualified (NQ) solicitors in London start on £61,000 and those in Bristol earn £44,000.

In our Trainee and Junior Lawyer Survey 2019–20, TLT chalked up As in seven categories including quality of work, peer support and partner approachability.

ULaw already has tie-ups with the likes of Linklaters, Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner (BCLP), Ashurst and, just this week, Deloitte. Meanwhile, BPP University Law School has similar deals with Allen & Overy, Freshfields and Herbert Smith Freehills, among others.

The training deal comes despite plans to replace both the GDL and LPC with the Solicitors Qualifying Examination (SQE) in September 2021.

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8 Comments

nqassociate@kirkland.com

Imagine working your nuts off to end up calling yourself a solicitor in London and earning £61k.

Absolute betacucks

Anonyman

In the grand scheme of things, a salary of £61,000 for someone in their mid twenties is hardly something that you can complain about.

Not everyone can work for a firm that can boast about offering remuneration packages that belong to the Cravath pay scale. There are plenty of law students that would bite somebody’s hand off to be given a training contract at TLT.

I’m not trying to paint the picture that they’re as prestigious as one of the Magic Circle, but the snobbery of some London based lawyers (or perhaps law students at a former polytechnic which is more likely) in the LC comment sections is astounding.

tips@legalcheek.com

They’ve just got their student loans through, and think they are suddenly balling Dig Bicks. give it a month and they’ll tone down.

Anon

True, but living in London is expensive. A US salary does make it a lot easier.

Anonymagic

Apologies for my ignorance, but what is the relevance of this deal? I thought that after 2020 students could not enroll anymore in the GDL/LPC courses?

Anon

This article is to meet LC’s monthly quota of positive coverage that U Law is paying Alex for.

US NQ

Who cares?

alexhasamicropenis@lc.com

ULaw is the equivalent of setting a bag full of diarrhoea shit on fire and they joyously stomping on it wearing your brand new Birkenstocks. Absolute omnishambles of a “university”.

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