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Father and daughter barristers discuss latest legal developments in ‘Carpool Caselaw’

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Spoiler: there’s no singing

Jonathan Seitler QC and Miriam Seitler

A father-and-daughter barrister duo have injected a spot of legal learning into their evening commute, filming themselves discussing recent case law as they tackle London’s nightmarish traffic.

Wilberforce Chambers‘ Jonathan Seitler QC and his daughter, Miriam Seitler, a barrister at Landmark Chambers, have taken inspiration from ‘Carpool Karaoke’, a recurring segment on The Late Late Show with James Corden, which sees musical guests sing along to their songs whilst zipping around LA in a 4×4.

Seitlers’ spin-off, cleverly dubbed ‘Carpool Caselaw’ (spoiler: there’s no singing), see the property law specialists discuss the recent Court of Appeal case University of London v Cornerstone Telecommunications Infrastructure Limited.

The case, as the website of Wilberforce helpfully explains, concerned interim and temporary rights under the new Electronic Communications Code in Schedule 3A to the Communications Act 2003, which you are no doubt aware was introduced by the Digital Economy Act 2017. Jonathan successfully acted for the respondent.

Expert analysis aside, highlights include Jonathan’s slight preoccupation with the football on the radio at the start of the five-minute long clip and the random interruption from the car’s sat-nav. “I don’t know how to turn this off,” the QC confesses.

This isn’t the first time the father-daughter pair have taken to the road to discuss the latest developments in property law. Earlier this summer the legally-minded duo discussed London Kendal Street v Daejan Investments, a county court case which concerned the ability of a landlord to refuse the tenant’s lease renewal on the ground that the landlord intends to redevelop the premises.

Jonathan Seitler QC will be speaking at Legal Cheek’s latest bar student event, ‘How to make it as a barrister’, tonight at The University of Law’s Bloomsbury campus in London.

The 2020 Legal Cheek Chambers Most List

20 Comments

Thrill enthusiast

What a thrilling conversation to have with family

(24)(3)

a

Anyone who rubbishes this is sour grapes – nobody is forcing you to watch it! Wholesome way to do essentially what an article does – disseminate views about recent cases from an authority.

(48)(4)

Family Lawyer = Lawyer Family

Agreed, it’s always nice to see a sliver of warmth and wholesomeness make its way into the dark, damp, unforgiving environment that is law. Father and daughter barristers, father lawyer losing hamster, etc. I like these kinds of stories, they remind me that there really is a human being behind the successful, high flying persona that actually has more important things in life than law – as it should be.

I had a professor on my LLM who was a partner at his law firm, corporate / funds stuff all day long. But then he told me his daughter was in criminal justice, which inspired him to read up a bit on criminal law and it eventually became a daily activity for him, reading what was happening in the criminal / prosecution world. For what are funds compared to your daughter? Great professor, one of the best I had.

(27)(1)

M

I take my 5yr to court. I give him a hand full of business cards and have him tout for business. Never too early to start thinking about commercial awareness.

(21)(0)

In House

Fully agree, I have an 8 year old who has just started to take an interest in what I do, and its enjoyable to be able to share it with him – Albeit presenting some aspects of the role in a positive light isn’t always the easiest of tasks…

(8)(2)

JDP

I told my kids they have to wait till they’re 18 to know what I do all day.

(14)(0)

In House

Cracking the same joke time after time on this website – Probably not something you want to admit to, is it?

“Come on Dad, lets go the park”

“Sorry son, Dad’s got to make an innuendo on Legal Cheek”

“Not again, Dad?”

“Yes, son – It’s a way of life now. I must do it, they’re relying on me”

“You’re no fun, Dad – Now I know why Mum left you”

(8)(3)

Anonymous

I wish my dad was a barrister. It would have made obtaining pupillage much easier.

(47)(12)

Not bitter that I'm or anything

Actually a lot of QCs seem to have children who are junior tenants at other top sets where the family name no doubt commands respect. I’m sure that they are all very talented in their own right but it goes to show that for all the talk of the Bar’s meritocratic culture a little bit of nepotism can still help you get over the finishing line.

Nice video btw

(12)(1)

Anonymous

They know what the job entails, probably have a first rate education and will have the benefit of genetics that give them a statistically high chance of being very significantly above average intelligence. So their parentage gives strong objectively supportable information about their suitability for the job.

(4)(6)

Not that I'm bitter or anything

There are plenty of other ways that an applicant can demonstrate they are intelligent and know what a career at the Bar entails. More likely is that the members of the pupillage committee want to avoid awkwardly running into one of their colleagues at a Hampstead dinner party after rejecting their kid.

(9)(1)

AA

“They know what the job entails, probably have a first rate education and will have the benefit of genetics that give them a statistically high chance of being very significantly above average intelligence.”

Good to know that we’re breeding a new master race of barristers. Funny how it doesn’t seem true in other professions, especially considering that barristers represent just 0.02% of the UK’s population…

This has to be one of the worst arguments I’ve read in a long time. I hope you’re not holding yourself out as an exemplar of the phenomenon in action?

(8)(0)

Anon

Intelligence is mainly a genetic trait. The leftists do not like that truth. The leftists are science deniers in that regard.

Kirkland Lad

Haha – how amusing! Bit of a shame they have to drive around in that battered old motor though.

(14)(2)

Dark Destroyer

Each person has their ups and downs, mental health is important in the legal profession. Stay healthy and stay happy as without health money and belongings mean nothing.

(5)(3)

M

My father was so disappointed when I failed to follow in his footsteps as a lorry driver, whilst my mother shed silent tears when she found out that I’d rather be a solicitor than become a nurse like her. I think they gave up on my sister, whom sadly became a solicitor. Now I too must deal with the fact that my son already wants to go his own way becoming a barrister.

(12)(0)

Anon

I did the BVC when my kids were quite young and they heard me revising.
I realised that I had a budding barrister on my hands when my 7 year old daughter fell over on the school bus ( because the driver took off before she’d had been able to sit down) and she remarked to her friend ‘ he owes us a duty of care, you know’….

(8)(1)

billy bellins

oh the irony of two of m’learned friends from a chambers who profess to specialise in environmental law crawling at 5 mph through the traffic of a city with the best public transport in the whole of the UK

(11)(0)

Scep Tick

Should this not be linked to the “easing through pupillage” interview?

Q. What else should we know about you?

A. Daddy is a QC.

(12)(0)

Not a magic circle lawyer

Excellent barristers, would highly recommend.

(2)(3)

Comments are closed.

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