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DWF’s Milton Keynes office to close next month

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Exclusive: News of the closure comes just weeks after firm’s flotation on London Stock Exchange

📸 DWF’s Milton Keynes office

The Milton Keynes office of international law firm DWF is to close next month, Legal Cheek can reveal.

It is understood that staff at the office were called into a meeting earlier this week and informed of the closure. DWF has 17 members of staff in Milton Keynes, including one partner.

News of the decision comes just weeks after the outfit floated on the London Stock Exchange (LSE) in a move which reportedly raised around £95 million.

A spokesperson for DWF told Legal Cheek:

“DWF has decided not to renew the lease on its Milton Keynes office when it expires on Friday, 31 May. This decision has been taken to ensure that our office portfolio continues to support the strategic objectives of the business.”

The spokesperson confirmed that “where possible, colleagues will be given the option of working agile or to relocate to another office.” Legal Cheek understands there are no plans to close any other offices.

In response to media speculation, DWF confirmed last summer it was considering “a number of strategic options”, including the “possibility” of an initial public offering, in a bid to achieve its strategic “objectives more quickly”. The firm formally announced its intention to float back in February and listed on the LSE several weeks later, with a share price that valued the international player at £366 million.

The Manchester-headquartered outfit has 27 offices across the globe, including 11 in the UK, and offers around 40 training contracts each year — none of which are in Milton Keynes.

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32 Comments

DWF survivor

Glad to see Andy Leatherbantz’s pet project went well.

How’s the share price going btw?

(24)(1)

Anonymous

You know shares for new floats only start to vary beyond minor movements when the first batches of results are published. Would expect Q1 to Q4 published accounts to have a hearing on their price. Your banter is terrible.

(1)(16)

Anonymous

Hi Andy.

(19)(1)

#disrupttoprogress

Check their latest gender pay gap figures on the BBC’s article today. Completely appalling.

(12)(4)

Anonymous

Gender pay gap is an irrelevant sop to feminist moaners. It means nothing about a business.

(10)(9)

Anonymous

A relocation away from Milton Keynes sounds like a bonus, tbh.

(22)(2)

Anonymous

I know we collectively rinse a lot of firms in these comments, but no firm warrants it more than DWF. Grotty.

(21)(1)

Anonymous

Agreed. Glorified sweaty claims mill with zero credibility. Poor fuckers who went to do TCs with that bucket shop

(14)(0)

Anonymous

Paralegal factory – ordinarily I would always recommend people get some paralegal experience if they need to, have been unsuccessful with TCs etc. however avoid DWF at all costs.

(1)(0)

DWF PTSD

Agreed. The office floors look like something taken out of a Hieronymus Bosch painting, the windows all misty from the sweaty condensation of the hot boiler room. Plus you get paid £22k in London for the privilege.

(6)(1)

Anonymous

Conveniently waited for the IPO to formalise last month before announcing closures

(16)(1)

Anonymous

Not a fan of them but doesn’t seem to be a big deal making less than 20 people work from home in a firm of 2500+ people.

(12)(2)

Anonymous

I meant fewer, not less. My bad.

By the rules of the internet I will go kill myself for such a mistake.

(12)(0)

Anonymous II

go ‘and’ kill…

(1)(5)

Anonymous

Oh whatever will we do, whatever will we do?

(1)(0)

Vince

You do get an enormous amount of froth and speculation in the aftermath of a big initial public offering – give it time!

(2)(2)

Dreadnort

Legacy office from a firm they took over quite a few years ago I understand. Not surprised they are shutting it when lease is up with handful of people there, they have over 3000 staff. Doesn’t look as if anyone is being made redundant.

(5)(4)

Anonymous

Hi Andy.

(6)(2)

Anonymous

Ex Greenwoods office?

(4)(0)

Anonymous

DWF seems a better bet than the other firms which have floated. They’ve locked in the work winning partners. I’d buy shares in them before buying shares in a firm whose partners can walk out the door at any time with all of their clients.

(4)(6)

Anonymous

Hi Andy.

(7)(3)

Anonymous

Nonsense. They’ve locked in a bunch of underperforming equity partners who would be unable to get a properly remunerated job elsewhere. They’ve lost a bunch of work winners since the IPO was announced. Look at their profitability. They’re at about £300k PEP. That’s what they’ve locked in!

(13)(2)

Anonymous

All they have done by locking equity partners in is to delay the mass exodus. Do you really want a partner tied in for 5 years? They have all had bumper payouts from the listing, and may well think now is the time to relax…

(6)(1)

Anonymous

Oh look, it isn’t all rosy in the DWF garden. Nobody but nobody saw that coming.

I wonder if their third rate advocacy team can argue their way out of it?

(8)(2)

Anonymous

PEP will grow as they use the IPO money to lure in new partners with decent remuneration packages and shares. Their model is going to massively disrupt the traditional recruitment market because other firms won’t bevable to match what’s on offer.

(2)(9)

Anonymous

Someone is a beg for a TC there.

(3)(1)

Anonymous

Hi Andy

(6)(4)

Anonymous

This got old a few comments above

(5)(2)

Anonymous

What is disruptive about offering people a decent remuneration package and a share in profits? Isn’t that how law firms have remunerated partners forever?

(1)(0)

Annonymous

Yes, the MK team were from Greenwoods. They, along with all the quality Greenwoods people wisely did the right thing when Plexus took them over, to the painful cost of Plexus. Can’t see how they can all work at home! Suspect they will go to B’Ham or London. Surprised that DWF allowed them to open the office in MK anyway, given the lack of legal market there and the team’s over reliance on one client. This, coupled with a desire only to look after themselves and a complete lack of motivation to develop the business, which was what killed Greenwoods in the first place. Whatever happens, they will look after themselves……..

(3)(0)

Andrew R

WTF is “working agile” ??

(4)(1)

Andon

@Andrew R – I think “working agile” is the wanky new corporate jargon for working from home, but the “agile” part probably also implies that they will expect you to be on hand for the bosses’ demands damn near 24/7. I am not a sol however, so that might just be me being cynical.

(0)(1)

Comments are closed.

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